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The Info List - Jackie Chan





Chan Kong-sang SBS[1] MBE[2] PMW[3] (Chinese: 陳港生; born 7 April 1954),[4] known professionally as Jackie Chan, is a Hong Konger martial artist, actor, film director, producer, stuntman, and singer. He is known in the cinematic world for his acrobatic fighting style, comic timing, use of improvised weapons, and innovative stunts, which he typically performs himself. He has trained in Wushu or Kung Fu
Kung Fu
and Hapkido,[5][6] and has been acting since the 1960s, appearing in over 150 films. Chan is one of the most recognisable and influential cinematic personalities in the world, gaining a widespread following in both the Eastern and Western hemispheres, and has received stars on the Hong Kong Avenue of Stars and the Hollywood Walk of Fame.[7][8] He has been referenced in various pop songs, cartoons, and video games. He is an operatically trained vocalist and is also a Cantopop
Cantopop
and Mandopop
Mandopop
star, having released a number of albums and sung many of the theme songs for the films in which he has starred. He is also a globally known philanthropist and has been named as one of the top 10 most charitable celebrities by Forbes
Forbes
magazine.[9][10] In 2004, film scholar Andrew Willis stated that Chan was "perhaps" the "most recognised star in the world".[11] In 2015, Forbes
Forbes
estimated his net worth to be $350 million, and as of 2016[update], he was the second-highest paid actor in the world.[12][13]

Contents

1 Early life 2 Film career

2.1 1962–1975: Early appearances 2.2 1976–1979: Early leading roles 2.3 1980–1987: Success in the action comedy genre 2.4 1988–1998: Acclaimed sequels and Hollywood breakthrough 2.5 1999–2007: Fame in Hollywood and dramatisation 2.6 2008–present: New experiments and change in style

3 Other careers

3.1 Music 3.2 Academia

4 Personal life 5 Stunts and screen persona 6 Legacy 7 Political views and controversy 8 Entrepreneurship and philanthropy 9 Endorsements 10 Filmography 11 Discography 12 Awards and nominations

12.1 Others

13 See also 14 References 15 Further reading 16 External links

Early life Chan was born on 7 April 1954 in Hong Kong
Hong Kong
as Chan Kong-sang to Charles and Lee-Lee Chan, refugees from the Chinese Civil War. His parents nicknamed him Pao-pao (Chinese: 炮炮 'Cannonball') because the energetic child was always rolling around.[14] His parents worked for the French ambassador in Hong Kong, and Chan spent his formative years within the grounds of the consul's residence in the Victoria Peak
Victoria Peak
district.[15] Chan attended the Nah-Hwa Primary School on Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Island, where he failed his first year, after which his parents withdrew him from the school. In 1960, his father emigrated to Canberra, Australia, to work as the head cook for the American embassy, and Chan was sent to the China Drama Academy, a Peking Opera School run by Master Yu Jim-yuen.[15][16] Chan trained rigorously for the next decade, excelling in martial arts and acrobatics.[17] He eventually became part of the Seven Little Fortunes, a performance group made up of the school's best students, gaining the stage name Yuen Lo in homage to his master. Chan became close friends with fellow group members Sammo Hung
Sammo Hung
and Yuen Biao, and the three of them later became known as the Three Brothers or Three Dragons.[18] After entering the film industry, Chan along with Sammo Hung
Sammo Hung
got the opportunity to train in hapkido under the grand master Jin Pal Kim, and Chan eventually attained a black belt.[5] Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
also trained in other styles of martial arts such as Karate, Judo, Taekwondo
Taekwondo
and Jeet Kune Do. Chan joined his parents in Canberra
Canberra
in 1976, where he briefly attended Dickson College
Dickson College
and worked as a construction worker.[19] A fellow builder named Jack took Chan under his wing, thus earning Chan the nickname of "Little Jack" that was later shortened to "Jackie", and the name Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
has stuck with him ever since.[20] In the late 1990s, Chan changed his Chinese name to Fong Si-lung (Chinese: 房仕龍), since his father's original surname was Fong.[20]

Film career 1962–1975: Early appearances He began his career by appearing in small roles at the age of five as a child actor. At age eight, he appeared with some of his fellow "Little Fortunes" in the film Big and Little Wong Tin Bar
Big and Little Wong Tin Bar
(1962) with Li Li-Hua
Li Li-Hua
playing his mother. The following year, the young actor appeared in extras of The Love Eterne
The Love Eterne
(1963) and had a small role in King Hu's 1966 film Come Drink with Me.[21] In 1971, after an appearance as an extra in another kung fu film, A Touch of Zen, Chan was signed to Chu Mu's Great Earth Film Company.[22] At seventeen, he worked as a stuntman in the Bruce Lee
Bruce Lee
films Fist of Fury and Enter the Dragon
Enter the Dragon
under the stage name Chan Yuen Lung (Chinese: 陳元龍).[23] He received his first starring role later that year in Little Tiger of Canton
Little Tiger of Canton
that had a limited release in Hong Kong in 1973.[24]

1976–1979: Early leading roles In 1976, Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
received a telegram from Willie Chan, a film producer in the Hong Kong
Hong Kong
film industry who had been impressed with Jackie's stunt work. Willie Chan offered him an acting role in a film directed by Lo Wei. Lo had seen Chan's performance in the John Woo film Hand of Death (1976) and planned to model him after Bruce Lee with the film New Fist of Fury.[22] His stage name was changed to Sing Lung (Chinese: 成龍, also transcribed as Cheng Long,[25] literally "become the dragon") to emphasise his similarity to Bruce Lee, whose stage name meant "Little Dragon" in Chinese. The film was unsuccessful because Chan was not accustomed to Lee's martial arts style. Despite the film's failure, Lo Wei continued producing films with similar themes, but with little improvement at the box office.[26] Chan's first major breakthrough was the 1978 film Snake in the Eagle's Shadow, shot while he was loaned to Seasonal Film Corporation under a two-picture deal.[27] Director Yuen Woo-ping
Yuen Woo-ping
allowed Chan complete freedom over his stunt work. The film established the comedic kung fu genre, and proved refreshing to the Hong Kong audience.[28] The same year, Chan then starred in Drunken Master, which finally propelled him to mainstream success.[29] Upon Chan's return to Lo Wei's studio, Lo tried to replicate the comedic approach of Drunken Master, producing Half a Loaf of Kung Fu and Spiritual Kung Fu.[20] He also gave Chan the opportunity to make his directorial debut in The Fearless Hyena. When Willie Chan left the company, he advised Jackie to decide for himself whether or not to stay with Lo Wei. During the shooting of Fearless Hyena Part II, Chan broke his contract and joined Golden Harvest, prompting Lo to blackmail Chan with triads, blaming Willie for his star's departure. The dispute was resolved with the help of fellow actor and director Jimmy Wang Yu, allowing Chan to stay with Golden Harvest.[27]

1980–1987: Success in the action comedy genre Willie Chan became Jackie's personal manager and firm friend, and remained so for over 30 years. He was instrumental in launching Chan's international career, beginning with his first forays into the American film industry in the 1980s. His first Hollywood film was The Big Brawl in 1980.[30] Chan then played a minor role in the 1981 film The Cannonball Run, which grossed over US$100 million worldwide.[31] Despite being largely ignored by North American audiences in favour of established American actors such as Burt Reynolds, Chan was impressed by the outtakes shown at the closing credits, inspiring him to include the same device in his future films. After the commercial failure of The Protector in 1985, Chan temporarily abandoned his attempts to break into the US market, returning his focus to Hong Kong
Hong Kong
films.[26] Back in Hong Kong, Chan's films began to reach a larger audience in East Asia, with early successes in the lucrative Japanese market including Drunken Master, The Young Master
The Young Master
(1980) and Dragon Lord (1982).[32] The Young Master
The Young Master
went on to beat previous box office records set by Bruce Lee
Bruce Lee
and established Chan as Hong Kong cinema's top star. With Dragon Lord, he began experimenting with elaborate stunt action sequences,[33] including the final fight scene where he performs various stunts, including one where he does a back flip off a loft and falls to the lower ground.[34] Chan produced a number of action comedy films with his opera school friends, Sammo Hung
Sammo Hung
and Yuen Biao. The three co-starred together for the first time in 1983 in Project A, which introduced a dangerous stunt-driven style of martial arts that won it the Best Action Design Award at the third annual Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Film Awards.[35] Over the following two years, the "Three Brothers" appeared in Wheels on Meals and the original Lucky Stars
Lucky Stars
trilogy.[36][37] In 1985, Chan made the first Police Story film, a crime action film in which Chan performed a number of dangerous stunts. It won Best Film at the 1986 Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Film Awards.[38] In 1986, Chan played "Asian Hawk," an Indiana Jones-esque character, in the film Armour of God. The film was Chan's biggest domestic box office success up to that point, grossing over HK$35 million.[39]

1988–1998: Acclaimed sequels and Hollywood breakthrough In 1988, Chan starred alongside Sammo Hung
Sammo Hung
and Yuen Biao for the last time to date, in the film Dragons Forever. Hung co-directed with Corey Yuen, and the villain in the film was played by Yuen Wah, both of whom were fellow graduates of the China Drama Academy. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, Chan starred in a number of successful sequels beginning with Project A
Project A
Part II and Police Story 2, which won the award for Best Action Choreography at the 1989 Hong Kong Film Awards. This was followed by Armour of God II: Operation Condor, and Police Story 3: Super Cop, for which Chan won the Best Actor Award at the 1993 Golden Horse Film Festival. In 1994, Chan reprised his role as Wong Fei-hung
Wong Fei-hung
in Drunken Master
Drunken Master
II, which was listed in Time Magazine's All-Time 100 Movies.[40] Another sequel, Police Story 4: First Strike, brought more awards and domestic box office success for Chan, but did not fare as well in foreign markets.[41] Up until January 1995, his films had grossed over HK$500 million (US$70 million) in Hong Kong,[42] ¥39 billion (US$489 million) in Japan,[32] 11.5 million box office admissions in France,[43] and 9.9 million box office admissions in Germany.[44] Despite his success in Asia and Europe, he was not very successful in North America, where he had only two wide releases as a leading actor, The Big Brawl
The Big Brawl
and The Protector, grossing US$9.51 million (US$32 million adjusted for inflation).[45] Chan rekindled his Hollywood ambitions in the 1990s, but refused early offers to play villains in Hollywood films to avoid being typecast in future roles. For example, Sylvester Stallone
Sylvester Stallone
offered him the role of Simon Phoenix, a criminal in the futuristic film Demolition Man. Chan declined and the role was taken by Wesley Snipes.[46] Chan finally succeeded in establishing a foothold in the North American market in 1995 with a worldwide release of Rumble in the Bronx, attaining a cult following in the United States that was rare for Hong Kong
Hong Kong
movie stars.[47] The success of Rumble in the Bronx led to a 1996 release of Police Story 3: Super Cop in the United States under the title Supercop, which grossed a total of US$16,270,600. Chan's first huge blockbuster success came when he co-starred with Chris Tucker
Chris Tucker
in the 1998 buddy cop action comedy Rush Hour,[48] grossing US$130 million in the United States alone.[27] This film made him a Hollywood star, after which he wrote his autobiography in collaboration with Jeff Yang
Jeff Yang
entitled I Am Jackie Chan.

1999–2007: Fame in Hollywood and dramatisation In 1998, Chan released his final film for Golden Harvest, Who Am I?. After leaving Golden Harvest in 1999, he produced and starred alongside Shu Qi
Shu Qi
in Gorgeous, a romantic comedy that focused on personal relationships and featured only a few martial arts sequences.[49] Although Chan had left Golden Harvest in 1999, the company continued to produce and distribute for two of his films, Gorgeous (1999) and The Accidental Spy
The Accidental Spy
(2001). Chan then helped create a PlayStation
PlayStation
game in 2000 called Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
Stuntmaster, to which he lent his voice and performed the motion capture.[50] He continued his Hollywood success in 2000 when he teamed up with Owen Wilson in the Western action comedy Shanghai Noon. A sequel, Shanghai Knights followed in 2003 and also featured his first onscreen fight scene with Donnie Yen.[51] He reunited with Chris Tucker
Chris Tucker
for Rush Hour 2
Rush Hour 2
(2001) which was an even bigger success than the original, grossing $347 million worldwide.[52] Chan experimented with the use of special effects and wirework for the fight scenes in his next two Hollywood films, The Tuxedo
The Tuxedo
(2002) and The Medallion
The Medallion
(2003), which were not as successful critically or commercially.[53] In 2004, he teamed up with Steve Coogan
Steve Coogan
in Around the World in 80 Days, loosely based on Jules Verne's novel of the same name, which was a box office bomb.[54] In 2004, film scholar Andrew Willis stated that Chan was "perhaps" the "most recognised star in the world".[11] Despite the success of the Rush Hour and Shanghai Noon
Shanghai Noon
films, Chan became frustrated with Hollywood over the limited range of roles and lack of control over the filmmaking process.[55] In response to Golden Harvest's withdrawal from the film industry in 2003, Chan started his own film production company, JCE Movies Limited
JCE Movies Limited
(Jackie Chan Emperor Movies Limited) in association with Emperor Multimedia Group (EMG).[27] His films have since featured an increasing number of dramatic scenes while continuing to succeed at the box office; examples include New Police Story
New Police Story
(2004), The Myth (2005) and the hit film Rob-B-Hood
Rob-B-Hood
(2006).[56][57][58] Chan's next release was the third instalment in the Rush Hour series: Rush Hour 3
Rush Hour 3
in August 2007. It grossed US$255 million.[59] However, it was a disappointment in Hong Kong, grossing only HK$3.5 million during its opening weekend.[60]

2008–present: New experiments and change in style Chan at the Cannes Film Festival
Cannes Film Festival
in 2012 Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
on the set of Chinese Zodiac
Chinese Zodiac
(2 May 2012) Filming of The Forbidden Kingdom, Chan's first onscreen collaboration with fellow Chinese actor Jet Li, was completed on 24 August 2007 and the movie was released in April 2008. The movie featured heavy use of effects and wires.[61][62] Chan voiced Master Monkey in Kung Fu
Kung Fu
Panda (released in June 2008), appearing with Jack Black, Dustin Hoffman, and Angelina Jolie.[63] In addition, he has assisted Anthony Szeto in an advisory capacity for the writer-director's film Wushu, released on 1 May 2008. The film stars Sammo Hung
Sammo Hung
and Wang Wenjie as father and son.[64] In November 2007, Chan began filming Shinjuku Incident, a dramatic role featuring no martial arts sequences with director Derek Yee, which sees Chan take on the role of a Chinese immigrant in Japan.[65] The film was released on 2 April 2009. According to his blog, Chan discussed his wishes to direct a film after completing Shinjuku Incident, something he has not done for a number of years.[66] The film expected to be the third in the Armour of God series, and had a working title of Armour of God III: Chinese Zodiac. The film was released on 12 December 2012.[67] Because the Screen Actors Guild did not go on strike, Chan started shooting his next Hollywood movie The Spy Next Door
The Spy Next Door
at the end of October in New Mexico.[68] In The Spy Next Door, Chan plays an undercover agent whose cover is blown when he looks after the children of his girlfriend. In Little Big Soldier, Chan stars, alongside Leehom Wang as a soldier in the Warring States period
Warring States period
in China. He is the lone survivor of his army and must bring a captured enemy soldier Leehom Wang to the capital of his province. In 2010 he starred with Jaden Smith
Jaden Smith
in The Karate
Karate
Kid, a remake of the 1984 original.[69] This was Chan's first dramatic American film. He plays Mr. Han, a kung fu master and maintenance man who teaches Jaden Smith's character kung fu so he can defend himself from school bullies. His role in The Karate
Karate
Kid won Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
the Favorite Buttkicker award at the Nickelodeon Kids' Choice Awards
Nickelodeon Kids' Choice Awards
in 2011.[70] In Chan's next movie, Shaolin, he plays a supporting role as a cook of a temple instead of one of the major characters. His 100th movie, 1911, was released on 26 September 2011. Chan was the co-director, executive producer, and lead star of the movie.[71] While Chan has directed over ten films over his career, this was his first directorial work since Who Am I? in 1998. 1911 premiered in North America on 14 October.[72] While at the 2012 Cannes Film Festival, Chan announced that he was retiring from action films citing that he was getting too old for the genre. He later clarified that he would not be completely retiring from action films, but would be performing fewer stunts and taking care of his body more.[73] In 2013, Chan starred in Police Story 2013, a reboot of the Police Story franchise directed by Ding Sheng, and it was released in China at the end of 2013. Chan's next film Dragon Blade was released in early 2015 and co-starred Hollywood actors John Cusack
John Cusack
and Adrien Brody. In 2015, Chan was awarded the title of "Datuk" by Malaysia
Malaysia
as he helped Malaysia
Malaysia
to boost its tourism, especially in Kuala Lumpur where he previously shot his films.[74] In early 2017, Chan's new film titled Kung Fu
Kung Fu
Yoga, a Chinese-Indian project, which also starred Disha Patani, Sonu Sood
Sonu Sood
and Amyra Dastur, was released. The film reunited Chan with director Stanley Tong, who directed a number of Chan's films in the 1990s. Upon release, the film was a huge success at the box office, and became the 5th highest-grossing film in China, one month after its release. In 2016 he teamed up with  Johnny Knoxville
Johnny Knoxville
and starred in his own production Skiptrace . Chan starred in the 2016 action-comedy Railroad Tigers
Railroad Tigers
and the 2017 action-thriller The Foreigner, an Anglo-Chinese production. He also stars in the science-fiction film Bleeding Steel. In 2019 he will team up with  John Cena
John Cena
and star in Project X-Traction. His films had collectively grossed HK$1.14 billion (US$147 million) at the Hong Kong
Hong Kong
box office up until 2010,[75] over US$72 million in South Korea between 1991 and 2010,[76] and ¥48.4 billion (US$607 million) in Japan up until 2012.[32] As of 2018[update], his films have grossed US$1.84 billion[77] (more than US$2.44 billion adjusted for inflation) in the United States and Canada,[45] CN¥8.6 billion (US$1.3 billion) in China,[78] 20 million box office admissions in France,[79] and over 27.3 million admissions in Germany, Spain and Italy.[44] As of 2018[update], his films have grossed more than US$5 billion at the worldwide box office.[77]

Other careers Music Chan and Qin Hailu
Qin Hailu
singing in Shanghai, China in August 2006 Chan had vocal lessons whilst at the Peking Opera School in his childhood. He began producing records professionally in the 1980s and has gone on to become a successful singer in Hong Kong
Hong Kong
and Asia. He has released 20 albums since 1984 and has performed vocals in Cantonese, Mandarin, Japanese, Taiwanese and English. He often sings the theme songs of his films, which play over the closing credits. Chan's first musical recording was " Kung Fu
Kung Fu
Fighting Man", the theme song played over the closing credits of The Young Master (1980).[80] At least 10 of these recordings have been released on soundtrack albums for the films.[81][82] His Cantonese
Cantonese
song Story of a Hero (英雄故事) (theme song of Police Story) was selected by the Royal Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Police and incorporated into their recruitment advertisement in 1994.[83] Chan voiced the character of Shang in the Chinese release of the Walt Disney animated feature, Mulan (1998). He also performed the song "I'll Make a Man Out of You", for the film's soundtrack. For the US release, the speaking voice was performed by B.D. Wong
B.D. Wong
and the singing voice was done by Donny Osmond. In 2007, Chan recorded and released "We Are Ready", the official one-year countdown song to the 2008 Summer Olympics
2008 Summer Olympics
which he performed at a ceremony marking the one-year countdown to the 2008 Summer Paralympics.[84] Chan also released one of the two official Olympics albums, Official Album for the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games – Jackie Chan's Version, which featured a number of special guest appearances.[85] Chan performed "Hard to Say Goodbye" along with Andy Lau, Liu Huan
Liu Huan
and Wakin (Emil) Chau, at the 2008 Summer Olympics
2008 Summer Olympics
closing ceremony.[86]

Academia Chan received his honorary Doctor of Social Science degree in 1996 from the Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Baptist University.[87] In 2009, he received another honorary doctorate from the University of Cambodia,[88][89] and has also been awarded an honorary professorship by the Savannah College of Art and Design
Savannah College of Art and Design
in Hong Kong
Hong Kong
in 2008.[90] Chan is currently a faculty member of the School of Hotel and Tourism Management at the Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Polytechnic University,[91] where he teaches the subject of tourism management. As of 2015[update], he also serves as the Dean of the Jackie Chan Film and Television Academy under the Wuhan Institute of Design and Sciences.[92]

Personal life In 1982, Chan married Joan Lin, a Taiwanese actress. Their son, singer and actor Jaycee Chan, was born that same year.[55] After he engaged in an extra-marital affair with Elaine Ng Yi-Lei, an illegitimate daughter by the name of Etta Ng Chok Lam was born on 18 January 1999. It turned into a scandal within the media. Although he reportedly gave Elaine 70,000 HK dollars each month for her living expenses and 600,000 HK dollars when she moved to Shanghai, the transactions were later claimed to be nonexistent by her lawyer.[93][94][95][96] Despite regretting the results of the affair, Chan said he had "only committed a fault that many men in the world commit".[97][98][99] During the incident, Elaine stated she would take care of her daughter without Chan.[100] Chan speaks Cantonese, Mandarin, English, and American Sign Language and also speaks some German, Korean, Japanese, Spanish, and Thai.[101] Chan is an avid football fan and supports the Hong Kong national football team, the England national football team, and Manchester City.[102] He is a fan of the Italian duo Bud Spencer
Bud Spencer
and Terence Hill, from whom he was inspired for his movies.[103]

Stunts and screen persona Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
tries on a fighter pilot's helmet with night vision goggles Chan has performed most of his own stunts throughout his film career, which are choreographed by the Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
Stunt
Stunt
Team. He has stated in interviews that the primary inspiration for his more comedic stunts were films such as The General, directed by and starring Buster Keaton who was also known to perform his own stunts. The team was established in 1983, and Chan has used them in all his subsequent films to make choreographing easier, given his understanding of each member's abilities.[104] Chan and his team undertake many of the stunts performed by other characters in his films, shooting the scenes so that their faces are obscured.[105] In 1982, Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
began experimenting with elaborate stunt action sequences in Dragon Lord,[106] which featured a pyramid fight scene that holds the record for the most takes required for a single scene, with 2900 takes,[107] and the final fight scene where he performs various stunts, including one where he does a back flip off a loft and falls to the lower ground.[108] In 1983, Project A
Project A
saw the official formation of the Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
Stunt
Stunt
Team and added elaborate, dangerous stunts to the fights and typical slapstick humor (at one point, Chan falls from the top of a clock tower through a series of fabric canopies). Police Story (1985) contained many large-scale action scenes, including an opening sequence featuring a car chase through a shanty town, Chan stopping a double-decker bus with his service revolver and a climactic fight scene in a shopping mall. This final scene earned the film the nickname "Glass Story" by the crew, due to the huge number of panes of sugar glass that were broken. During a stunt in this last scene, in which Chan slides down a pole from several stories up, the lights covering the pole had heated it considerably, resulting in Chan suffering second-degree burns, particularly to his hands, as well as a back injury and dislocation of his pelvis upon landing.[109] Chan performed similarly elaborate stunts in numerous other films, such as several Police Story sequels, Project A Part II, the Armor of God series, Dragons Forever, Drunken Master
Drunken Master
II, Rumble in the Bronx, and the Rush Hour series, among others. The dangerous nature of his stunts makes it difficult to get insurance, especially in the United States where his stunt work is contractually limited.[105] Chan holds the Guinness World Record for "Most Stunts by a Living Actor", which emphasises that "no insurance company will underwrite Chan's productions in which he performs all his own stunts".[110] Chan has been injured frequently when attempting stunts; many of them have been shown as outtakes or as bloopers during the closing credits of his films. He came closest to death filming Armour of God when he fell from a tree and fractured his skull. Over the years, he has dislocated his pelvis and also broken numerous parts of his body, including his fingers, toes, nose, both cheekbones, hips, sternum, neck, ankle, and ribs.[111][112] Promotional materials for Rumble in the Bronx
Rumble in the Bronx
emphasised that he performed all of the stunts, and one version of the movie poster even diagrammed his many injuries.

Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
at the 2013 Cannes Film Festival Chan created his screen persona as a response to the late Bruce Lee and the numerous imitators who appeared before and after Lee's death. Lee's characters were typically stern, morally upright heroes. In contrast, Chan plays well-meaning, slightly foolish regular men, often at the mercy of their friends, girlfriends, or families, who always triumph in the end despite the odds.[20] Additionally, he has stated that he deliberately styles his movement to be the opposite of Lee's: where Lee held his arms wide, Chan holds his tight to the body; where Lee was loose and flowing, Chan is tight and choppy. Despite the success of the Rush Hour series, Chan has stated that he is not a fan of it, since he neither appreciates the action scenes in the movie nor understands American humour.[113] In the 2000s, the ageing Chan grew tired of being typecast as an action hero, prompting him to act with more emotion in his latest films.[114] In New Police Story, he portrayed a character suffering from alcoholism and mourning his murdered colleagues.[81] To further shed the image of "nice guy", Chan played an anti-hero for the first time in Rob-B-Hood
Rob-B-Hood
starring as Thongs, a burglar with gambling problems.[115] He plays a low-level gangster in 2009's Shinjuku Incident, a serious drama set in Tokyo about unsavory characters.[116]

Legacy Jackie Chan's star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
enjoys his experiences on the flight deck aboard USS Kitty Hawk (CV 63) 2 December 2002. Chan has received worldwide recognition for his acting and stunt work. His awards include the Innovator Award from the American Choreography Awards and a lifetime achievement award from the Taurus World Stunt Awards.[117] He has stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame
Hollywood Walk of Fame
and the Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Avenue of Stars.[118] In addition, Chan has also been honoured by placing his hand and footprints at Grauman's Chinese Theatre.[119] Despite considerable box office success in Asia, Chan's Hollywood films have been criticised with regard to their action choreography. Reviewers of Rush Hour 2, The Tuxedo, and Shanghai Knights
Shanghai Knights
noted the toning down of Chan's fighting scenes, citing less intensity compared to his earlier films.[120][121][122] The comedic value of his films is questioned; some critics stating that they can be childish at times.[123] Chan was awarded the MBE in 1989 and the Silver Bauhinia Star (SBS) in 1999. Chan has been the subject of Ash's song "Kung Fu", Heavy Vegetable's " Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
Is a Punk Rocker", Leehom Wang's "Long Live Chinese People", as well as in "Jackie Chan" by Frank Chickens, and television shows Tim and Eric Awesome Show, Great Job!, Celebrity Deathmatch
Celebrity Deathmatch
and Family Guy. He has been the inspiration for manga such as Dragon Ball (including a character with the alias "Jackie Chun"),[124] the character Lei Wulong
Lei Wulong
in Tekken
Tekken
and the fighting-type Pokémon Hitmonchan.[125][126][127] Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
has a sponsorship deal with Mitsubishi Motors
Mitsubishi Motors
that has resulted in the appearance of Mitsubishi cars in a number of his films. Furthermore, Mitsubishi launched a limited series of Evolution cars personally customised by Chan.[128][129][130] A number of video games have been based on, or featured, Jackie Chan. His film Wheels on Meals
Wheels on Meals
spawned the hit 1984 Japanese beat 'em up arcade video game, Spartan X (released as Kung-Fu Master in Western markets), and its sequel Spartan X 2 for the NES/Famicom console. Jackie Chan's Action Kung Fu
Kung Fu
was released in 1990 for the PC-Engine and NES. In 1995, Chan was featured in the arcade fighting game Jackie Chan The Kung-Fu Master. A series of Japanese games were released on the MSX
MSX
by Pony, based on several of Chan's films (Project A, Project A 2, Police Story, The Protector and Wheels on Meals). Other games based on Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
include Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
Stuntmaster, Jackie Chan Adventures and Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
J-Mat Fitness.[131] Chan was also the primary catalyst for the creation of review aggregation website Rotten Tomatoes, whose founder Senh Duong was his fan and created the website after collecting all the reviews of Chan's Hong Kong
Hong Kong
action movies as they were being released in the United States. In anticipation for Rush Hour, Chan's first major Hollywood crossover, he coded the website in two weeks and the site went live shortly before the release of Rush Hour.[132][133] Chan says he has always wanted to be a role model to children, and has remained popular with them due to his good-natured acting style. He has generally refused to play villains and has been very restrained in using swear words in his films – he persuaded the director of Rush Hour to take "fuck" out of the script.[134] Chan's greatest regret in life is not having received a proper education,[135] inspiring him to fund educational institutions around the world. He funded the construction of the Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
Science Centre at the Australian National University[136] and the establishment of schools in poor regions of China.[137] Chan is a spokesperson for the Government of Hong Kong, appearing in public service announcements. In a Clean Hong Kong
Hong Kong
commercial, he urged the people of Hong Kong
Hong Kong
to be more considerate with regards to littering, a problem that has been widespread for decades.[138] Furthermore, in an advertisement promoting nationalism, he gave a short explanation of the March of the Volunteers, the national anthem of the People's Republic of China.[139] When Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Disneyland opened in 2005, Chan participated in the opening ceremony.[140] In the United States, Chan appeared alongside Arnold Schwarzenegger
Arnold Schwarzenegger
in a government advert to combat copyright infringement and made another public service announcement with Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca
Lee Baca
to encourage people, especially Asian people, to join the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department.[141][142] Construction has begun on a Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
museum in Shanghai. In November 2013, a statue of Chan was unveiled in front of what is now known as the JC Film Gallery, scheduled to open in the spring of 2014.[143] On 25 June 2013, Chan responded to a hoax Facebook page created a few days earlier that alleged he had died. He said that several people contacted him to congratulate him on his recent engagement, and soon thereafter contacted him again to ask if he was still alive. He posted a Facebook message, commenting: "If I died, I would probably tell the world!"[144][145] On 1 February 2015, Chan was awarded the honour of Knight Commander of the Order of the Territorial Crown by the Yang di-Pertuan Agong
Yang di-Pertuan Agong
of Malaysia
Malaysia
Tuanku Abdul Halim in conjunction with the country's Federal Territory Day. It carries the title of Datuk
Datuk
in Malaysia.[146][147] In 2015, a made-up word inspired by Chan's description of his hair during an interview for a commercial, duang, became an internet viral meme in China. The Chinese character for the word is a composite of two characters of Chan's name.[148]

Political views and controversy The Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Star, in Hong Kong During a news conference in Shanghai on 28 March 2004, Chan referred to the recently concluded Republic of China 2004 presidential election in Taiwan, in which Democratic Progressive Party
Democratic Progressive Party
candidates Chen Shui-bian and Annette Lu
Annette Lu
were re-elected as President and Vice-President, as "the biggest joke in the world".[149][150][151] A Taiwanese legislator and senior member of the DPP, Parris Chang, called for the government of Taiwan
Taiwan
to ban his films and bar him the right to visit Taiwan.[149] Police and security personnel separated Chan from scores of protesters shouting "Jackie Chan, get out" when he arrived at Taipei airport in June 2008.[152] Referring to his participation in the torch relay for the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing, Chan spoke out against demonstrators who disrupted the relay several times attempting to draw attention to a wide-ranging number of grievances against the Chinese government. He warned that "publicity seekers" planning to stop him from carrying the Olympic Torch "not get anywhere near" him. Chan also argued that the Olympics coverage that year would "provide another way for us to tell the world about Chinese culture."[153]

Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
at the 2005 Toronto International Film Festival In 2009, Chan was named an "anti-drug ambassador" by the Chinese government, actively taking part in anti-drug campaigns and supporting President Hu Jintao's declaration that illegal drugs should be eradicated, and their users punished severely. In 2014, when his own son Jaycee was arrested for cannabis use, he said that he was "angry", "shocked", "heartbroken" and "ashamed" of his son. He also remarked, "I hope all young people will learn a lesson from Jaycee and stay far from the harm of drugs. I say to Jaycee that you have to accept the consequences when you do something wrong."[154] On 18 April 2009, during a panel discussion at the annual Boao Forum for Asia, he questioned whether or not broad freedom is a good thing.[155] Noting the strong tensions in Hong Kong
Hong Kong
and Taiwan, he said, "I'm gradually beginning to feel that we Chinese need to be controlled. If we're not being controlled, we'll just do what we want."[156][157] Chan's comments prompted angry responses from several prominent figures in Taiwan
Taiwan
and Hong Kong.[158][159] A spokesman later said Chan was referring to freedom in the entertainment industry, rather than in Chinese society at large.[160] In December 2012, Chan caused outrage when he criticised Hong Kong
Hong Kong
as a "city of protest", suggesting that demonstrators' rights in Hong Kong should be limited.[161] The same month, in an interview with Phoenix TV, Chan stated that the United States was the "most corrupt" country in the world,[162] which in turn angered parts of the online community.[162][163] Other articles situated Chan's comments in the context of his career and life in the United States, including his "embrace of the American film market"[163] and his seeking asylum in the United States from Hong Kong
Hong Kong
triads.[164] In April 2016, Chan was named in the Panama Papers.[165] In 2019, Chan criticized Hong Kong
Hong Kong
anti-extradition bill protests,[166] saying that the "'Five-starred Red Flag' is respected everywhere around the world."[167]

Entrepreneurship and philanthropy The Duke of Cambridge Prince William with actor Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
at the London Conference on The Illegal Wildlife Trade at the Natural History Museum, 12 February 2014. In addition to his film production and distribution company, JCE Movies Limited, Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
also owns or co-owns the production companies JC Group China, Jackie & Willie Productions[168] (with Willie Chan) and Jackie & JJ Productions.[169] Chan has also put his name to Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
Theater International, a cinema chain in China, co-run by Hong Kong
Hong Kong
company Sparkle Roll Group Ltd. The first—Jackie Chan-Yaolai International Cinema—opened in February 2010, and is claimed to be the largest cinema complex in China, with 17 screens and 3,500 seats. Chan expressed his hopes that the size of the venue would afford young, non-commercial directors the opportunity to have their films screened. 15 further cinemas in the chain are planned for 2010,[needs update] throughout Beijing, Shanghai and Guangzhou, with a potential total of 65 cinemas throughout the country proposed.[170][171] In 2004, Chan launched his own line of clothing, which bears a Chinese dragon logo and the English word "Jackie", or the initials "JC".[172] Chan also has a number of other branded businesses. His sushi restaurant chain, Jackie's Kitchen, has outlets throughout Hong Kong, as well as seven in South Korea, with plans to open another in Las Vegas. Jackie Chan's Cafe has outlets in Beijing, Singapore, and the Philippines. Other ventures include Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
Signature Club gyms (a partnership with California Fitness), and a line of chocolates, cookies and nutritional oatcakes.[173] With each of his businesses, a percentage of the profits goes to various charities, including the Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
Charitable Foundation. In 2016, Chan partnered with Asian Le Mans Series champion David Cheng to form a racing team in the series and the FIA World Endurance Championship. The two met in March 2015 and Chan told Cheng about his interest in motorsports and raised the possibility of starting a team.[174] Together, the two formed Baxi DC Racing Alpine, the first mainland China-based operation in WEC. In October, leading into the 2016–17 Asian Le Mans Series season, the team was rebranded to Jackie Chan DC Racing and raced with liveries promoting Chan's movie Kung Fu
Kung Fu
Yoga.[175] At the 2017 24 Hours of Le Mans, the team became the first Chinese team to win its class (LMP2).[176] Chan is a UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador, and has championed charitable works and causes. He has campaigned for conservation, against animal abuse and has promoted disaster relief efforts for floods in mainland China and the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami.[16][177][178] In June 2006, citing his admiration of the efforts made by Warren Buffett and Bill Gates
Bill Gates
to help those in need, Chan pledged the donation of half his assets to charity upon his death.[179] On 10 March 2008, Chan was the guest of honour for the launch, by Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd, of the Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
Science Centre at the John Curtin School of Medical Research
John Curtin School of Medical Research
of the Australian National University. Chan is also a supporter and ambassador of Save China's Tigers, which aims to save the endangered South China tiger through breeding and releasing them into the wild.[180] Following the 2008 Sichuan earthquake, Chan donated RMB ¥10 million to help those in need. In addition, he is planning to make a film about the Chinese earthquake to raise money for survivors.[181] In response to the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami, Chan and fellow Hong Kong-based celebrities, including American rapper MC Jin, headlined a special three-hour charity concert, titled Artistes 311 Love Beyond Borders, on 1 April 2011 to help with Japan's disaster recovery effort.[182][183] The 3-hour concert raised over $3.3 million.[184] In January 2017, Chan donated $65,000 to help flood victims in Thailand.[185] Chan founded the Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
Charitable Foundation in 1988, to offers scholarship and active help to Hong Kong's young people and provide aid to victims of natural disaster or illness.[10] In 2005 Chan created the Dragon's Heart Foundation to help children and the elderly in remote areas of China by building schools, providing books, fees, and uniforms for children; the organisation expanded its reach to Europe in 2011.[186][187] The foundation also provides for the elderly with donations of warm clothing, wheelchairs, and other items.

Endorsements One product which Chan had endorsed in China was the "Little Tyrant" ("小霸王") produced by Subor, a Nintendo Entertainment System hardware clone marketed as a "learning machine" to circumvent China's then ban on video game consoles.[188]

Filmography Main article: Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
filmography Discography Main article: Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
discography Awards and nominations Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
in 2012 on the set of Chinese Zodiac

Year

Association

Category

Nominated work

Result

1983

Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Film Awards

Best Action Choreography

Dragon Lord

Nominated

1984

Golden Horse Film Festival

Best Leading Actor

Project A

Nominated

1985

Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Film Awards

Best Actor

Project A

Nominated

1986

Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Film Awards

Best Director

Police Story

Nominated

Best Actor

Heart of Dragon

Nominated

Best Actor

Police Story

Nominated

1987

Golden Horse Film Festival

Best Director

Project A
Project A
Part II

Nominated

Golden Horse Film Festival

Special
Special
Award

N/A

Won

1989

Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Film Awards

Best Picture

Rouge

Won

Golden Horse Film Festival

Best Leading Actor

Miracles

Nominated

1990

Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Film Awards

Best Actor

Miracles

Nominated

Best Action Choreography

Miracles

Won

1991

Golden Horse Film Festival

Special
Special
Achievement Award

N/A

Won

1992

Golden Horse Film Festival

Best Leading Actor

Police Story 3

Won

1993

Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Film Awards

Best Actor

Police Story 3'

Nominated

Golden Horse Film Festival

Best Leading Actor

Crime Story

Won

Best Action Choreography

Crime Story

Nominated

Golden Phoenix Awards

Outstanding Contribution Award

N/A

Won

Asia Pacific Film Festival

Lifetime Achievement Award

N/A

Won

1994

Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Film Awards

Best Actor

Crime Story

Nominated

Best Action Choreography

Crime Story

Nominated

1995

MTV Movie Awards

Lifetime Achievement Award

N/A

Won

Golden Horse Film Festival

Best Action Choreography

Rumble in the Bronx

Nominated

1996

MTV Movie Awards

Best Fight

Rumble in the Bronx

Nominated

Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Film Awards

Best Action Choreography

Rumble in the Bronx

Won

1997

Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Film Awards

Best Actor

Police Story 4: First Strike

Nominated

MTV Movie Awards

Best Fight

Police Story 4: First Strike

Nominated

Fant-Asia Film Festival

Best Asian Film

Drunken Master
Drunken Master
II

Won

1998

Cinequest Film Festival

Maverick Spirit Award

N/A

Won

1999

Blockbuster Entertainment Awards

Favorite Duo – Action/Adventure

Rush Hour

Won

Golden Horse Film Festival

Best Action Choreography

Gorgeous

Nominated

Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Film Awards

Best Action Choreography

Who Am I?

Won

Golden Bauhinia Awards

Best Actor

Who Am I?

Nominated

MTV Movie Awards

Best Fight (shared with Chris Tucker)

Rush Hour

Nominated

MTV Movie Awards

Best On-Screen Duo (shared with Chris Tucker)

Rush Hour

Won

Hollywood Film Festival

Actor of the Year

N/A

Won

2000

International Indian Film Academy Awards

Special
Special
Award

Awarded for Global Impact

Won

Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Film Awards

Best Action Choreography

Gorgeous

Nominated

2001

Blockbuster Entertainment Awards

Favorite Action Team

Shanghai Noon

Nominated

Golden Horse Film Festival

Best Action Choreography

The Accidental Spy

Nominated

Montreal World Film Festival

Grand Prix des Amériques

N/A

Won

2002

American Choreography Awards

Innovator Award

N/A

Won

Daytime Emmy Awards

Outstanding Performer in an Animated Program

Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
Adventures

Nominated

MTV Movie Awards

Best On-Screen Team (shared with Chris Tucker)

Rush Hour 2

Nominated

MTV Movie Awards

Best Fight (shared with Chris Tucker)

Rush Hour 2

Won

World Stunt
Stunt
Awards

Taurus Honorary Award

N/A

Won

Teen Choice Awards

Choice Chemistry (shared with Chris Tucker)

Rush Hour 2

Nominated

Kid's Choice Awards

Favorite Male Action Hero

Rush Hour 2

Won

Favorite Male Movie Star

Rush Hour 2

Won

2003

Kid's Choice Awards

Favorite Male Butt Kicker

The Tuxedo

Won

Favorite Movie Actor

The Tuxedo

Nominated

MTV Movie Awards

Best On-Screen Team (shared with Owen Wilson)

Shanghai Knights

Nominated

2005

Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Film Awards

Professional Achievement Award

N/A

Won

Best Actor

New Police Story

Nominated

Best Action Choreography

New Police Story

Won

Golden Bauhinia Awards

Best Actor

New Police Story

Nominated

Beijing Student Film Festival

Best Actor

New Police Story

Nominated

Golden Rooster Awards

Best Actor

New Police Story

Won

Shanghai International Film Festival

Outstanding Contribution to Chinese Cinema

N/A

Won

Golden Phoenix Awards

Outstanding Contribution Award

N/A

Won

Asia Pacific Film Festival

Special
Special
Jury Award

N/A

Won

2006

Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Film Awards

Best Original Film Song

The Myth

Nominated

Best Action Choreography

The Myth

Nominated

Hundred Flowers Awards

Best Actor

New Police Story

Nominated

2007

Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Film Awards

Best Action Choreography

Rob-B-Hood

Nominated

2008

MTV Movie Awards

Best Fight (shared with Chris Tucker
Chris Tucker
and Sun Mingming)

Rush Hour 3

Nominated

Teen Choice Awards

Choice Movie Actor: Action Adventure

The Forbidden Kingdom

Nominated

People's Choice Awards

Favorite on Screen Match-up (shared with Chris Tucker)

Rush Hour 3

Nominated

2010

Asia Pacific Film Festival

Outstanding Achievement Award

N/A

Won

2011

People's Choice Awards

Favorite On-Screen Team (shared with Jaden Smith)

The Karate
Karate
Kid

Nominated

People's Choice Awards

Favorite Action Star

N/A

Won

Kid's Choice Awards

Favorite Butt Kicker

The Karate
Karate
Kid

Won

2012

Behind the Voice Actors Awards

Voice Acting Awards

Kung Fu
Kung Fu
Panda 2

Won

Huading Award

Outstanding Achievement

N/A

Won

2013

Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Film Awards

Best Action Choreography

Chinese Zodiac

Won

Macau International Movie Festival

Golden Lotus Awards for Best Director

Chinese Zodiac

Won

Golden Lotus Awards for Best Picture

Chinese Zodiac

Nominated

Golden Horse Film Festival

Best Action Choreography

Chinese Zodiac

Won

Huabiao Film Awards

Outstanding Abroad Actor

Chinese Zodiac

Nominated

Beijing Student Film Festival

Best Actor

Guns and Roses

Nominated

Huading Award

Best Actor in a Motion picture

Chinese Zodiac

Nominated

2014

Hundred Flowers Awards

Best Actor

Chinese Zodiac

Nominated

The Asian Awards

Fellowship Award

N/A

Won

2015

Huading Award

Best Action Choreography for motion pictures

Dragon Blade

Won

Huading Award

Best Vocal Performance for a Theme Song

Dragon Blade

Won

ASEAN International Film Festival and Awards

ASEAN Inspiration Award

N/A

Won

2016

Academy Awards

Academy Honorary Award

Awarded for his "extraordinary achievements" in film

Won

Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Film Awards

Best Action Choreography

Dragon Blade

Nominated

2018

Huading Award

Best Actor in a Motion picture

The Foreigner

Nominated

2019

Britannia Awards

Albert R. Broccoli
Albert R. Broccoli
Britannia Award

Awarded for Worldwide Contribution to Entertainment

Won

Others The Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
Action Movie Awards, held at the Shanghai International Film Festival since 2015, is named after Jackie Chan. Walk of Fame

2002 motion pictures star at 6801 Hollywood Boulevard
Hollywood Boulevard
on the Walk of Fame[189] See also Hong Kong
Hong Kong
action cinema References

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^ a b " Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
- Box Office". The Numbers. Retrieved 8 December 2018.

^ "Jackie Chan". Maoyan. Tianjin Maoyan
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Culture Media. Archived from the original on 28 November 2018. Retrieved 28 November 2018.

^ " Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
(Acteur chinois)". JP's Box-Office. Retrieved 28 November 2018.

^ "Jackie Chan: Kung Fu
Kung Fu
Fighter Believes There's More to Him Than Meets the Eye". hkvpradio ( Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Vintage Pop Radio). Archived from the original on 31 December 2003. Retrieved 29 February 2012.

^ a b Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
(2004). New Police Story
New Police Story
(DVD). Hong Kong: JCE Movies Limited.

^ Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
(2006). Rob-B-Hood
Rob-B-Hood
(DVD). Hong Kong: JCE Movies Limited.

^ 警務處 (香港皇家警察招募) – 警察故事 (Television advertisement). Hong Kong: Royal Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Police. 1994.

^ "We Are Ready". Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
Kids. Retrieved 29 February 2012.

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Jackie Chan
releases Olympic album". China Daily. Retrieved 29 February 2012.

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Polytechnic University. Retrieved 26 May 2015.

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^ "Press Release". Phnom: University of Cambodia. 10 November 2009. Retrieved 1 March 2012.

^ " Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
Named Honorary Professor by U.S. college". China Daily. Retrieved 26 May 2015.

^ "Academic Staff". School of Hotel and Tourism Management, the Hong Kong Polytechnic University. Retrieved 26 May 2015.

^ " Kung fu
Kung fu
superstar Chan launches film and television academy". China Daily. Retrieved 26 May 2015.

^ "Jackie Chan's Daughter Is Homeless & Living Under a Bridge Due To Her 'Homophobic' Parents".

^ " Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
refused to help his daughter's mother, says lawyer". The Straits Times.

^ "Fans desert Jackie Chan". BBC. 31 March 2000. Retrieved 1 March 2012.

^ "小龍女富貴臉 像房祖名 ("Dragon"'s daughter has a wealthy appearance; looks like Jaycee Chan)". 20 May 2009. Retrieved 1 March 2012.

^ 吳綺莉復出 林鳳嬌不爽? Archived 9 February 2013 at Archive.today. Worldjournal.com (17 July 2011).

^ [1] Archived 22 March 2007 at the Wayback Machine

^ Asian Film Foundation – 05/13/05 – Are these Asian stars married or not? Archived 3 October 2006 at the Wayback Machine. Asianfilm.org.

^ 組圖:成龍首次開口談私生女 女兒,對不起. People's Daily.

^ "An interview with Jackie Chan". Empire (104): 5. 1998.

^ "Extra Time: Manchester City fan Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
in good Kompany". Goal.com. Retrieved 2 January 2013.

^ http://www.budterence.tk/aneddoti.php

^ Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
(1987). Police Story Commentary (DVD). Hong Kong: Dragon Dynasty.

^ a b Rogers, Ian. " Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
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^ " Dragon Lord
Dragon Lord
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^ David Everitt (16 August 1996). "Kicking and Screening: Wheels on Meals, Armour of God, Police Story, and more are graded with an eye for action". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved 12 April 2011.

^ Jackie Chan. "Jackie's Aches and Pains: It Only Hurts When I'm Not Laughing". Random House. Retrieved 19 December 2012.

^ "January 2003 News Archives". Jackie Chan
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Jackie Chan
Injury Map". Jackie Chan Kids. Retrieved 29 February 2012.

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Jackie Chan
re-injures back while filming". The Star. Malaysia. 27 August 2007. Archived from the original on 25 January 2012. Retrieved 29 February 2012.

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Jackie Chan
Admits He Is Not a Fan of 'Rush Hour' Films". Fox News Channel. 30 September 2007. Retrieved 29 February 2012.

^ "Jackie Chan: From action maestro to serious actor". China Daily. 24 September 2004. Retrieved 29 February 2012.

^ "For the first time, Chan plays an unconventional role in his newest comedy (成龙首次尝试反派 联手陈木胜再拍动作喜剧)" (in Chinese). Sina Corp. 30 December 2005. Retrieved 29 February 2012.

^ "Jackie Chan: The Young Master
The Young Master
Comes of Age". Asia Society. 27 June 2013. Retrieved 2 April 2014.

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Jackie Chan
From Hong Kong
Hong Kong
to Receive Stunt
Stunt
Award". Xinhuanet. 16 May 2002. Archived from the original on 25 February 2012. Retrieved 29 February 2012.

^ Ortega, Albert (4 October 2002). " Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
Honored with a Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame". EZ-Entertainment. Archived from the original on 25 April 2003. Retrieved 29 February 2012.

^ Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
replaces missing Hollywood hand prints

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Rush Hour 2
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The Tuxedo
Review". Official website of Roger Ebert. Retrieved 29 February 2012.

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Shanghai Knights
Review". BBC
BBC
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^ Honeycutt, Kirk (16 June 2004). "Around the World in 80 Days Review". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on 30 September 2007. Retrieved 29 February 2012.

^ Hebert, James (22 August 2003). "Inspiration for Dragonball". San Diego Tribune. Retrieved 1 March 2012.

^ "Masters of the Martial Arts". Celebrity Deathmatch. Season 1. Episode 12. 1999.

^ "Breaking Out Is Hard to Do". Family Guy. Season 4. Episode 9. 17 July 2005.

^ Orecklin, Michael (10 May 1999). "Pokemon: The Cutest Obsession". Time.

^ Chan, Jackie. "Note From Jackie: My Loyalty Toward Mitsubishi 19 June 2007". Official website of Jackie Chan. Archived from the original on 2 July 2007. Retrieved 1 March 2012.

^ "E! Online Question and Answer (Jackie Chan)". Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
Kids. Retrieved 1 March 2012.

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^ " Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
Video Games". Hardcore Gaming 101. 6 February 2010.

^ "20 Years Later, Rush Hour Is Still a Buddy-Cop Gem". Rotten Tomatoes. 18 September 2018.

^ Semley, John (2018). Hater: On the Virtues of Utter Disagreeability. Penguin Books. pp. 26–27. ISBN 9780735236172.

^ " Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
Wants to Be Role Model". The Washington Post. Associated Press. 4 August 2006. Retrieved 1 March 2012.

^ Webb, Adam (29 September 2000). "Candid Chan: Action star Jackie Chan takes on students' questions". The Flat Hat. Archived from the original on 11 October 2007. Retrieved 1 March 2012.

^ "ANU to name science centre after Jackie Chan" (Press release). Australia National University. 24 February 2006. Retrieved 1 March 2012.

^ "Biography of Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
(Page 8)". Biography. Tiscali. Retrieved 1 March 2012.

^ Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
(2002). Clean Hong Kong
Hong Kong
(Television). Hong Kong: Hong Kong Government.

^ Agencies (18 May 2005). " Hong Kong
Hong Kong
marshal Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
to Boost Nationalism". China Daily. Retrieved 1 March 2012.

^ "Jackie Chan, Chow Yun-fat
Chow Yun-fat
among VIPs invited to HK Disneyland opening". Sina Corp. Associated Press. 18 August 2005. Retrieved 1 March 2012.

^ Schwarzenegger, Arnold; Jackie Chan. "Anti-piracy advert". Advertisement. United States Government. Retrieved 10 September 2007.

^ " Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
stars in LAPD recruitment campaign". China Daily. 11 March 2007. Retrieved 1 March 2012.

^ Fei Lai (9 November 2013). " Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
wants to be serious but will never quit action films". Shanghai Daily. Retrieved 11 March 2014.

^ " Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
response to RIP hoax". United Press International. 25 June 2013. Retrieved 25 June 2013.

^ " Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
declares well-being". Yahoo!. 25 June 2013. Retrieved 25 June 2013.

^ " Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
now a Datuk". The Star Online. 1 February 2015. Retrieved 2 February 2015.

^ " Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
given Datuk
Datuk
title". Yahoo! Entertainment Singapore. 1 February 2015. Archived from the original on 18 February 2015. Retrieved 2 February 2015.

^ "Millions share new Chinese character". BBC. 2 March 2015.

^ a b " Taiwan
Taiwan
lawmaker calls for Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
movie ban". China Daily. 22 April 2004. Retrieved 1 March 2012.

^ " Taiwan
Taiwan
election biggest joke in the world". China Daily. 29 March 2004. Retrieved 1 March 2012.

^ "Protestors blast Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
for criticizing Taiwan
Taiwan
elections". People News. 18 June 2008. Archived from the original on 29 February 2012. Retrieved 1 March 2012.

^ "Protesters greet Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
in Taiwan". ABC News (Australia). 19 June 2008. Retrieved 1 March 2012.

^ "Kung-fu star Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
to chop down Olympic protesters". Metro. UK. 15 April 2008.

^ " Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
shocked and angry over son's drug arrest". CBC News. Canada. 20 August 2014.

^ Min Lee (21 April 2009). "Spokesman: Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
comments out of context". Yahoo! News. Archived from the original on 27 April 2009. Retrieved 1 March 2012.

^ William Foreman (18 April 2009). "Jackie Chan: Chinese people need to be controlled". Yahoo! News. Archived from the original on 21 April 2009. Retrieved 1 March 2012.

^ " Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
warns over China 'chaos': report". Yahoo! News. 19 April 2009. Archived from the original on 25 April 2009. Retrieved 1 March 2012.

^ Coonan, Clifford (20 April 2009). "Chinese shouldn't get more freedom, says Jackie Chan". The Independent. UK. Retrieved 1 March 2012.

^ Le-Min Lim (22 April 2009). " Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
Faces Film Boycott for Chaotic Taiwan
Taiwan
Comments". Bloomberg. Archived from the original on 19 October 2008. Retrieved 1 March 2012.

^ "Jackie Chan's 'freedom' talk sparks debate". People's Daily. 22 April 2009. Retrieved 1 March 2012.

^ Colleen Lee and Tony Cheung (13 December 2012). "Jackie Chan criticises Hong Kong
Hong Kong
as 'city of protest'". South China Morning Post. Retrieved 2 January 2013.

^ a b Chow, Vivienne (12 January 2013). " Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
back in action, branding US more corrupt than China". South China Morning Post.

^ a b Fisher, Max (10 January 2013). "The anti-Americanism of Jackie Chan". The Washington Post.

^ "Actor Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
calls U.S. 'most corrupt' country in the world". Agence France-Presse. 12 January 2013.

^ "From Kubrick to Cowell: Panama Papers
Panama Papers
expose offshore dealings of the stars". The Guardian. 6 April 2016.

^ " Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
sparks outcry after weighing into Hong Kong
Hong Kong
protests". News.com.au. 16 August 2019.

^ " Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
sparks anger after backing Beijing amid Hong Kong protests". SBS News. 16 August 2019.

^ "Jackie & Willie Productions Limited". Film database entry (Studios). HKCinemagic. Retrieved 2 June 2010.

^ "Jackie & JJ Productions Ltd – Hong Kong". Business index entry. HKTDC. Retrieved 1 March 2012.

^ " Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
launches cinema chain claiming to be the largest in China". News report. CCTV.com. 13 February 2010. Retrieved 1 March 2012.

^ Gregg Kilday and David Morgan (13 May 2010). " Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
plans turbo-charged slate". Film news report. THR Asia (Hollywood Reporter). Archived from the original on 18 May 2010. Retrieved 1 March 2012.

^ "Fashion leap for Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
as Kung-fu star promotes new clobber". JC-News. Agence France-Presse. 2 April 2004. Retrieved 1 March 2012.

^ "Jackie Chan's business empire kicks into place". Taipei Times. 11 April 2005. Retrieved 1 March 2012.

^ Barre, Geoffroy (25 February 2016). " David Cheng tells us how he joined forces with Jackie Chan". Automobile Club de l'Ouest. Retrieved 18 June 2017.

^ " Jackie Chan DC Racing announces new partners and new additions to all star driver line up". Motorsport.com. 27 October 2016. Retrieved 20 June 2017.

^ " Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
cheered us on to a historic Le Mans result – Cheng". Crash.net. 19 June 2017. Retrieved 20 June 2017.

^ " Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
Urges China to 'Have a Heart' for Dogs". PETA. Archived from the original on 3 September 2006. Retrieved 1 March 2012.

^ "UNICEF People: Jackie Chan: Goodwill Ambassador". UNICEF. Retrieved 1 March 2012.

^ " Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
looks to bequeath half of wealth". The Financial Express. Reuters. 29 June 2006. Archived from the original on 2 June 2016. Retrieved 1 March 2012.

^ "Save China's Tigers: Patrons and Supporters". SaveChina'Tigers.org. 22 August 2008. Archived from the original on 25 February 2012. Retrieved 1 March 2012.

^ " Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
plans China earthquake movie". thaindian.com. Retrieved 17 March 2011.

^ "Japan Earthquake Song Music Video". Jackiechan.com. Archived from the original on 10 March 2012. Retrieved 1 March 2012.

^ " Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
and HK celebrities to raise funds for quake victims in Japan". Xinhua News Agency. 25 March 2011. Archived from the original on 2 January 2012. Retrieved 1 March 2012.

^ Chu, Karen (4 April 2011). " Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
Raises $3.3 Million in Three Hours for Japan Relief (Exclusive)". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved 1 March 2012.

^ " Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
donates 2.3mil baht to flood victims". The Nation. 24 January 2017. Retrieved 25 January 2017.

^ "JC Dragon's Heart Europe & Sanjuro Martial Arts". Archived from the original on 21 September 2013.

^ Cavallaro, Albert (5 August 2014). "Celebrities Making a Difference, Part II". BORGEN Magazine. The Borgen Project. Retrieved 21 August 2015.

^ Jou, Eric (11 April 2013). "The Chinese Gaming Console with the Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
Seal of Approval". Kotaku. Archived from the original on 30 June 2019. Retrieved 30 June 2019.

^ " Hollywood Walk of Fame
Hollywood Walk of Fame
– Jackie Chan". walkoffame.com. Hollywood Chamber of Commerce. Archived from the original on 2 August 2017. Retrieved 11 February 2018.

Further reading

Boose, Thorsten; Oettel, Silke. Hongkong, meine Liebe – Ein spezieller Reiseführer. Shaker Media, 2009. ISBN 978-3-86858-255-0 (in German) Boose, Thorsten. Der deutsche Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
Filmführer. Shaker Media, 2008. ISBN 978-3-86858-102-7 (in German) Chan, Jackie, and Jeff Yang. I Am Jackie Chan: My Life in Action. New York: Ballantine Books, 1999. ISBN 0-345-42913-3. Jackie Chan's autobiography. Cooper, Richard, and Mike Leeder. 100% Jackie Chan: The Essential Companion. London: Titan Books, 2002. ISBN 1-84023-491-1. Cooper, Richard. More 100% Jackie Chan: The Essential Companion Volume 2. London: Titan Books, 2004. ISBN 1-84023-888-7. Corcoran, John. The Unauthorized Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
Encyclopedia: From Project A
Project A
to Shanghai Noon
Shanghai Noon
and Beyond. Chicago: Contemporary Books, 2003. ISBN 0-07-138899-0. Fox, Dan. Jackie Chan. Raintree Freestyle. Chicago, Ill.: Raintree, 2006. ISBN 1-4109-1659-6. Gentry, Clyde. Jackie Chan: Inside the Dragon. Dallas, Tex.: Taylor Pub, 1997. ISBN 0-87833-962-0. Le Blanc, Michelle, and Colin Odell. The Pocket Essential Jackie Chan. Pocket essentials. Harpenden: Pocket Essentials, 2000. ISBN 1-903047-10-2. Major, Wade. Jackie Chan. New York: Metrobooks, 1999. ISBN 1-56799-863-1. Moser, Leo. Made in Hong Kong: die Filme von Jackie Chan. Berlin: Schwarzkopf & Schwarzkopf, 2000. ISBN 3-89602-312-8. (in German) Poolos, Jamie. Jackie Chan. Martial Arts Masters. New York: Rosen Pub. Group, 2002. ISBN 0-8239-3518-3. Rovin, Jeff, and Kathleen Tracy. The Essential Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
Sourcebook. New York: Pocket Books, 1997. ISBN 0-671-00843-9. Stone, Amy. Jackie Chan. Today's Superstars: Entertainment. Milwaukee, Wis.: Gareth Stevens Pub, 2007. ISBN 0-8368-7648-2. Witterstaetter, Renee. Dying for Action: The Life and Films of Jackie Chan. New York: Warner, 1998. ISBN 0-446-67296-3. Wong, Curtis F., and John R. Little (eds.). Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
and the Superstars of Martial Arts. The Best of Inside Kung-Fu. Lincolnwood, Ill.: McGraw-Hill, 1998. ISBN 0-8092-2837-8. Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
and Zhu Mo Never Grow Up 2018 ISBN 978-7539981697. Jackie Chan's autobiography. Berger, Christian. Der echte Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
(The real Jackie Chan). Weiz: Selbstverlag, 2019, (in German).

External links

Wikiquote has quotations related to: Jackie Chan

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Jackie Chan.

Official website Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
on IMDb  Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
at the Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Movie DataBase Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
at AllMovie Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
at Rotten Tomatoes vteJackie Chan Filmography Discography Films directed The Fearless Hyena
The Fearless Hyena
(1979) The Young Master
The Young Master
(1980) Dragon Lord
Dragon Lord
(1982) Project A
Project A
(1983) Police Story (1985) Armour of God (1986) Project A
Project A
Part II (1987) Police Story 2
Police Story 2
(1988) Miracles (1989) Armour of God II: Operation Condor (1991) Drunken Master
Drunken Master
II (1994) Who Am I? (1998) Jackie Chan: My Stunts (1999) 1911 (2011) CZ12
CZ12
(2012) The Diary Albums First Time (1992) Video games Kung-Fu Master (1984) Jackie Chan's Action Kung Fu
Kung Fu
(1990) Spartan X 2 (1991) The Kung-Fu Master Jackie Chan
The Kung-Fu Master Jackie Chan
(1995) Jackie Chan Stuntmaster
Jackie Chan Stuntmaster
(2000) Jackie Chan Adventures
Jackie Chan Adventures
(2004) Jackie Chan J-Mat Fitness (2005) Books I Am Jackie Chan (1998) Never Grow Up (2015) Related JCE Movies Limited JJCC Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
Action Movie Awards Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
Stunt
Stunt
Team Looking for Jackie Traces of a Dragon A Tale of Three Cities Duang "Jackie Chan" (song) Charles and Lee-Lee Chan Joan Lin Jaycee Chan Willie Chan

Awards for Jackie Chan vteAcademy Honorary Award1928–1950 Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
/ Charlie Chaplin
Charlie Chaplin
(1928) Walt Disney
Walt Disney
(1932) Shirley Temple
Shirley Temple
(1934) D. W. Griffith
D. W. Griffith
(1935) The March of Time
The March of Time
/ W. Howard Greene and Harold Rosson (1936) Edgar Bergen
Edgar Bergen
/ W. Howard Greene / Museum of Modern Art
Museum of Modern Art
Film Library / Mack Sennett
Mack Sennett
(1937) J. Arthur Ball / Walt Disney
Walt Disney
/ Deanna Durbin
Deanna Durbin
and Mickey Rooney
Mickey Rooney
/ Gordon Jennings, Jan Domela, Devereaux Jennings, Irmin Roberts, Art Smith, Farciot Edouart, Loyal Griggs, Loren L. Ryder, Harry D. Mills, Louis Mesenkop, Walter Oberst / Oliver T. Marsh and Allen Davey / Harry Warner
Harry Warner
(1938) Douglas Fairbanks
Douglas Fairbanks
/ Judy Garland
Judy Garland
/ William Cameron Menzies / Motion Picture Relief Fund (Jean Hersholt, Ralph Morgan, Ralph Block, Conrad Nagel)/ Technicolor Company (1939) Bob Hope
Bob Hope
/ Nathan Levinson (1940) Walt Disney, William Garity, John N. A. Hawkins, and the RCA Manufacturing Company / Leopold Stokowski
Leopold Stokowski
and his associates / Rey Scott / British Ministry of Information (1941) Charles Boyer
Charles Boyer
/ Noël Coward
Noël Coward
/ Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
(1942) George Pal
George Pal
(1943) Bob Hope
Bob Hope
/ Margaret O'Brien
Margaret O'Brien
(1944) Republic Studio, Daniel J. Bloomberg, and the Republic Studio Sound Department / Walter Wanger
Walter Wanger
/ The House I Live In / Peggy Ann Garner (1945) Harold Russell
Harold Russell
/ Laurence Olivier
Laurence Olivier
/ Ernst Lubitsch
Ernst Lubitsch
/ Claude Jarman Jr. (1946) James Baskett
James Baskett
/ Thomas Armat, William Nicholas Selig, Albert E. Smith, and George Kirke Spoor
George Kirke Spoor
/ Bill and Coo / Shoeshine (1947) Walter Wanger
Walter Wanger
/ Monsieur Vincent
Monsieur Vincent
/ Sid Grauman
Sid Grauman
/ Adolph Zukor
Adolph Zukor
(1948) Jean Hersholt
Jean Hersholt
/ Fred Astaire
Fred Astaire
/ Cecil B. DeMille
Cecil B. DeMille
/ The Bicycle Thief (1949) Louis B. Mayer
Louis B. Mayer
/ George Murphy
George Murphy
/ The Walls of Malapaga (1950) 1951–1975 Gene Kelly
Gene Kelly
/ Rashomon
Rashomon
(1951) Merian C. Cooper
Merian C. Cooper
/ Bob Hope
Bob Hope
/ Harold Lloyd
Harold Lloyd
/ George Mitchell / Joseph M. Schenck / Forbidden Games
Forbidden Games
(1952) 20th Century-Fox Film Corporation / Bell & Howell Company / Joseph Breen / Pete Smith (1953) Bausch & Lomb Optical Company / Danny Kaye
Danny Kaye
/ Kemp Niver / Greta Garbo / Jon Whiteley
Jon Whiteley
/ Vincent Winter / Gate of Hell (1954) Samurai I: Musashi Miyamoto (1955) Eddie Cantor
Eddie Cantor
(1956) Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers
Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers
/ Gilbert M. "Broncho Billy" Anderson / Charles Brackett / B. B. Kahane (1957) Maurice Chevalier
Maurice Chevalier
(1958) Buster Keaton
Buster Keaton
/ Lee de Forest
Lee de Forest
(1959) Gary Cooper
Gary Cooper
/ Stan Laurel
Stan Laurel
/ Hayley Mills
Hayley Mills
(1960) William L. Hendricks / Fred L. Metzler / Jerome Robbins
Jerome Robbins
(1961) William J. Tuttle
William J. Tuttle
(1964) Bob Hope
Bob Hope
(1965) Yakima Canutt
Yakima Canutt
/ Y. Frank Freeman
Y. Frank Freeman
(1966) Arthur Freed (1967) John Chambers / Onna White (1968) Cary Grant
Cary Grant
(1969) Lillian Gish
Lillian Gish
/ Orson Welles
Orson Welles
(1970) Charlie Chaplin
Charlie Chaplin
(1971) Charles S. Boren / Edward G. Robinson
Edward G. Robinson
(1972) Henri Langlois
Henri Langlois
/ Groucho Marx
Groucho Marx
(1973) Howard Hawks
Howard Hawks
/ Jean Renoir
Jean Renoir
(1974) Mary Pickford
Mary Pickford
(1975) 1976–2000 Margaret Booth (1977) Walter Lantz
Walter Lantz
/ Laurence Olivier
Laurence Olivier
/ King Vidor
King Vidor
/ Museum of Modern Art Department of Film (1978) Hal Elias / Alec Guinness
Alec Guinness
(1979) Henry Fonda
Henry Fonda
(1980) Barbara Stanwyck
Barbara Stanwyck
(1981) Mickey Rooney
Mickey Rooney
(1982) Hal Roach
Hal Roach
(1983) James Stewart
James Stewart
/ National Endowment for the Arts
National Endowment for the Arts
(1984) Paul Newman
Paul Newman
/ Alex North (1985) Ralph Bellamy
Ralph Bellamy
(1986) Eastman Kodak
Kodak
Company / National Film Board of Canada
National Film Board of Canada
(1988) Akira Kurosawa
Akira Kurosawa
(1989) Sophia Loren
Sophia Loren
/ Myrna Loy
Myrna Loy
(1990) Satyajit Ray
Satyajit Ray
(1991) Federico Fellini
Federico Fellini
(1992) Deborah Kerr
Deborah Kerr
(1993) Michelangelo Antonioni
Michelangelo Antonioni
(1994) Kirk Douglas
Kirk Douglas
/ Chuck Jones
Chuck Jones
(1995) Michael Kidd
Michael Kidd
(1996) Stanley Donen
Stanley Donen
(1997) Elia Kazan
Elia Kazan
(1998) Andrzej Wajda
Andrzej Wajda
(1999) Jack Cardiff
Jack Cardiff
/ Ernest Lehman (2000) 2001–present Sidney Poitier
Sidney Poitier
/ Robert Redford
Robert Redford
(2001) Peter O'Toole
Peter O'Toole
(2002) Blake Edwards
Blake Edwards
(2003) Sidney Lumet
Sidney Lumet
(2004) Robert Altman
Robert Altman
(2005) Ennio Morricone
Ennio Morricone
(2006) Robert F. Boyle (2007) Lauren Bacall
Lauren Bacall
/ Roger Corman
Roger Corman
/ Gordon Willis
Gordon Willis
(2009) Kevin Brownlow / Jean-Luc Godard
Jean-Luc Godard
/ Eli Wallach
Eli Wallach
(2010) James Earl Jones
James Earl Jones
/ Dick Smith (2011) D. A. Pennebaker
D. A. Pennebaker
/ Hal Needham
Hal Needham
/ George Stevens Jr.
George Stevens Jr.
(2012) Angela Lansbury
Angela Lansbury
/ Steve Martin
Steve Martin
/ Piero Tosi (2013) Jean-Claude Carrière
Jean-Claude Carrière
/ Hayao Miyazaki
Hayao Miyazaki
/ Maureen O'Hara
Maureen O'Hara
(2014) Spike Lee
Spike Lee
/ Gena Rowlands
Gena Rowlands
(2015) Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
/ Lynn Stalmaster / Anne V. Coates / Frederick Wiseman (2016) Charles Burnett / Owen Roizman / Donald Sutherland
Donald Sutherland
/ Agnès Varda (2017) Marvin Levy / Lalo Schifrin
Lalo Schifrin
/ Cicely Tyson
Cicely Tyson
(2018) David Lynch
David Lynch
/ Wes Studi
Wes Studi
/ Lina Wertmüller
Lina Wertmüller
(2019)

vteBritannia AwardsExcellence in Film Albert R. Broccoli
Albert R. Broccoli
(1989) Michael Caine
Michael Caine
(1990) Peter Ustinov
Peter Ustinov
(1992) Martin Scorsese
Martin Scorsese
(1993) Anthony Hopkins
Anthony Hopkins
(1995) Bob Weinstein and Harvey Weinstein
Harvey Weinstein
(1996) Dustin Hoffman
Dustin Hoffman
(1997) John Travolta
John Travolta
(1998) Stanley Kubrick
Stanley Kubrick
(1999) Steven Spielberg
Steven Spielberg
(2000) George Lucas
George Lucas
(2002) Hugh Grant
Hugh Grant
(2003) Tom Hanks
Tom Hanks
(2004) Tom Cruise
Tom Cruise
(2005) Clint Eastwood
Clint Eastwood
(2006) Denzel Washington
Denzel Washington
(2007) Sean Penn
Sean Penn
(2008) Robert De Niro
Robert De Niro
(2009) Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges
(2010) Warren Beatty
Warren Beatty
(2011) Daniel Day-Lewis
Daniel Day-Lewis
(2012) George Clooney
George Clooney
(2013) Robert Downey Jr.
Robert Downey Jr.
(2014) Meryl Streep
Meryl Streep
(2015) Jodie Foster
Jodie Foster
(2016) Matt Damon
Matt Damon
(2017) Cate Blanchett
Cate Blanchett
(2018) Jane Fonda
Jane Fonda
(2019) Excellence in Directing Peter Weir
Peter Weir
(2003) Jim Sheridan (2004) Mike Newell (2005) Anthony Minghella
Anthony Minghella
(2006) Martin Campbell
Martin Campbell
(2007) Stephen Frears
Stephen Frears
(2008) Danny Boyle
Danny Boyle
(2009) Christopher Nolan
Christopher Nolan
(2010) David Yates
David Yates
(2011) Quentin Tarantino
Quentin Tarantino
(2012) Kathryn Bigelow
Kathryn Bigelow
(2013) Mike Leigh
Mike Leigh
(2014) Sam Mendes
Sam Mendes
(2015) Ang Lee
Ang Lee
(2016) Ava DuVernay
Ava DuVernay
(2017) Steve McQueen (2018) Jordan Peele
Jordan Peele
(2019) Worldwide Contribution to Entertainment Howard Stringer
Howard Stringer
(2003) Kirk Douglas
Kirk Douglas
(2009) Ridley Scott
Ridley Scott
& Tony Scott
Tony Scott
(2010) John Lasseter
John Lasseter
(2011) Will Wright (2012) Ben Kingsley
Ben Kingsley
(2013) Judi Dench
Judi Dench
(2014) Harrison Ford
Harrison Ford
(2015) Samuel L. Jackson
Samuel L. Jackson
(2016) Kenneth Branagh
Kenneth Branagh
(2017) Kevin Feige
Kevin Feige
(2018) Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
(2019) British Artist of the Year Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz
(2006) Kate Winslet
Kate Winslet
(2007) Tilda Swinton
Tilda Swinton
(2008) Emily Blunt
Emily Blunt
(2009) Michael Sheen
Michael Sheen
(2010) Helena Bonham Carter
Helena Bonham Carter
(2011) Daniel Craig
Daniel Craig
(2012) Benedict Cumberbatch
Benedict Cumberbatch
(2013) Emma Watson
Emma Watson
(2014) James Corden
James Corden
(2015) Felicity Jones
Felicity Jones
(2016) Claire Foy (2017) Emilia Clarke
Emilia Clarke
(2018) Phoebe Waller-Bridge
Phoebe Waller-Bridge
(2019) Excellence in Comedy Betty White
Betty White
(2010) Ben Stiller
Ben Stiller
(2011) Trey Parker
Trey Parker
and Matt Stone
Matt Stone
(2012) Sacha Baron Cohen
Sacha Baron Cohen
(2013) Julia Louis-Dreyfus
Julia Louis-Dreyfus
(2014) Amy Schumer
Amy Schumer
(2015) Ricky Gervais
Ricky Gervais
(2016) Aziz Ansari
Aziz Ansari
(2017) Jim Carrey
Jim Carrey
(2018) Steve Coogan
Steve Coogan
(2019) Excellence in Television Aaron Spelling
Aaron Spelling
(1999) HBO
HBO
Original Programming (2002) Dick Van Dyke
Dick Van Dyke
(2017) Damian Lewis
Damian Lewis
(2018) Norman Lear
Norman Lear
(2019) Humanitarian Award Richard Curtis
Richard Curtis
(2007) Don Cheadle
Don Cheadle
(2008) Colin Firth
Colin Firth
(2009) Idris Elba
Idris Elba
(2013) Mark Ruffalo
Mark Ruffalo
(2014) Orlando Bloom
Orlando Bloom
(2015) Ewan McGregor
Ewan McGregor
(2016) Retired Awards BBC
BBC
(1999) Tarsem Singh
Tarsem Singh
(1999) Angela Lansbury
Angela Lansbury
(2003) Helen Mirren
Helen Mirren
(2004) Elizabeth Taylor
Elizabeth Taylor
(2005) Ronald Neame
Ronald Neame
(2005) Sidney Poitier
Sidney Poitier
(2006) Bob Shaye and Michael Lynne (2007)

vteGolden Horse Award for Best Actor Wang Yin (1962) Tang Ching (1963) Ko Hsiang-ting (1965) Zhao Lei (1966) Ou Wei (1967) Tsui Fu-sheng (1968) Peter Yang (1969) Ko Hsiang-ting (1970) Wang Yin (1971) Ou Wei (1972) Peter Yang (1973) Charlie Chin (1975) Chang Feng (1976) Charlie Chin (1977) Chin Han (1978) Ko Chun-hsiung
Ko Chun-hsiung
(1979) Wang Kuan-hsiung (1980) Alan Tam
Alan Tam
(1981) Eddie Chan (1982) Sun Yueh
Sun Yueh
(1983) Danny Lee (1984) Chow Yun-fat
Chow Yun-fat
(1985) Ti Lung (1986) Chow Yun-fat
Chow Yun-fat
(1987) Alex Man (1988) Chen Sung-young (1989) Tony Leung Ka-fai (1990) Sihung Lung (1991) Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
(1992) Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
(1993) Tony Leung Chiu-wai
Tony Leung Chiu-wai
(1994) Lin Yang (1995) Xia Yu (1996) Tse Kwan-ho (1997) Lopsang (1998) Ko Chun-hsiung
Ko Chun-hsiung
(1999) Francis Ng (2000) Liu Ye (2001) Leon Lai
Leon Lai
(2002) Tony Leung Chiu-wai
Tony Leung Chiu-wai
(2003) Andy Lau
Andy Lau
(2004) Aaron Kwok
Aaron Kwok
(2005) Aaron Kwok
Aaron Kwok
(2006) Tony Leung Chiu-wai
Tony Leung Chiu-wai
(2007) Zhang Hanyu
Zhang Hanyu
(2008) Huang Bo and Nick Cheung
Nick Cheung
(2009) Ethan Juan
Ethan Juan
(2010) Andy Lau
Andy Lau
(2011) Sean Lau (2012) Lee Kang-sheng
Lee Kang-sheng
(2013) Chen Jianbin (2014) Feng Xiaogang (2015) Fan Wei (2016) Tu Men (2017) Xu Zheng (2018) Chen Yi-wen (2019)

vteGolden Lotus Award for Best Director2000s Jiang Wenli (2009) 2010s Chen Bing (2010) Siu Fai Mak and Felix Chong (2011) Ye Huaijun (2012) Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
(2013) Zhong Shujia (2014) Jean-Jacques Annaud
Jean-Jacques Annaud
(2015) Sherwood Hu (2016)

vteGolden Rooster Award for Best Actor1980s N/A (1981) Zhang Yan (1982) N/A (1983) Yang Zaibao/Dong Xingji (1984) Lu Xiaohe (1985) Liu Zifeng (1986) Liu Wenzhi (1987) Zhang Yimou
Zhang Yimou
(1988) Xie Yuan/ Tao Zeru
Tao Zeru
(1989) 1990s Lu Qi (1990) Li Xuejian (1991) Wang Tiecheng (1992) Ge You (1993) Li Baotian (1994) Li Rentang (1995) Gao Ming (1996) Liu Peiqi (1997) Feng Gong (1998) Teng Rujun (1999) 2000s Chen Daoming (2000) Ge Zhijun (2001) Ning Cai (2002) Xia Yu (2003) Liu Ye (2004) Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
(2005) Fu Dalong (2007) Wu Gang (2009) 2010s Sun Chun (2011) Huang Xiaoming/ Zhang Guoli (2013) Zhang Hanyu
Zhang Hanyu
(2015) Deng Chao (2017) Wang Jingchun
Wang Jingchun
(2019)

vte Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Film Award for Best Action Choreography Sammo Hung, Lam Ching Ying, Yuen Biao & Billy Chan Wui-Ngai (1982) Yuen Biao, Lam Ching Ying
Lam Ching Ying
& Billy Chan Wui-Ngai (1983) Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
Stunt
Stunt
Team (1984) Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
Stunt
Stunt
Team (1985) Ching Siu-tung (1986) Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
Stunt
Stunt
Team (1987) Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
Stunt
Stunt
Team (1988) Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
Stunt
Stunt
Team (1989) Ching Siu-tung (1990) Yuen Cheung-Yan, Yuen Sun-Yi & Lau Ka-Wing (1991) Yuen Woo-ping
Yuen Woo-ping
(1992) Corey Yuen & Yuen Tak (1993) Lau Kar-leung & Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
Stunt
Stunt
Team (1994) Stanley Tong
Stanley Tong
& Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
(1995) Stanley Tong
Stanley Tong
(1996) Stephen Tung Wai (1997) Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
(1998) Stephen Tung Wai (1999) Yuen Woo-ping
Yuen Woo-ping
(2000) Stephen Tung Wai & Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
Stunt
Stunt
Team (2001) Ching Siu-tung (2002) Donnie Yen
Donnie Yen
(2003) Yuen Woo-ping
Yuen Woo-ping
(2004) Donnie Yen
Donnie Yen
(2005) Yuen Woo-ping
Yuen Woo-ping
(2006) Donnie Yen
Donnie Yen
(2007) Sammo Hung
Sammo Hung
& Tony Leung Siu-Hung (2008) Stephen Tung Wai & Lee Tat Chiu (2009) Sammo Hung
Sammo Hung
(2010) Yuen Bun, Lan Hai Han & Sun Jiankui (2011) Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
& He Jun (2012) Yuen Woo-ping
Yuen Woo-ping
(2013) Donnie Yen, Stephen Tung, Yuen Bun & Yan Hua (2014) Li Chung Chi (2015) Tung Wai (2016)

vteMTV Movie Award for Best Fight    1996: Adam Sandler
Adam Sandler
vs. Bob Barker
Bob Barker
– Happy Gilmore 1997: Fairuza Balk
Fairuza Balk
vs. Robin Tunney
Robin Tunney
– The Craft 1998: Will Smith
Will Smith
vs. Cockroach – Men in Black 1999: Ben Stiller
Ben Stiller
vs. Puffy the Dog – There's Something About Mary 2000: Keanu Reeves
Keanu Reeves
vs. Laurence Fishburne
Laurence Fishburne
– The Matrix 2001: Zhang Ziyi
Zhang Ziyi
vs. Entire bar – Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon 2002: Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
and Chris Tucker
Chris Tucker
vs. Hong Kong
Hong Kong
gang – Rush Hour 2 2003: Yoda
Yoda
vs. Christopher Lee
Christopher Lee
– Star Wars: Episode II – Attack of the Clones 2004: Uma Thurman
Uma Thurman
vs. Chiaki Kuriyama
Chiaki Kuriyama
– Kill Bill: Volume 1 2005: Uma Thurman
Uma Thurman
vs. Daryl Hannah
Daryl Hannah
– Kill Bill: Volume 2 2006: Angelina Jolie
Angelina Jolie
vs. Brad Pitt
Brad Pitt
– Mr. & Mrs. Smith 2007: Gerard Butler
Gerard Butler
vs. Robert Maillet
Robert Maillet
– 300

2008: Sean Faris vs. Cam Gigandet
Cam Gigandet
– Never Back Down 2009: Robert Pattinson
Robert Pattinson
vs. Cam Gigandet
Cam Gigandet
– Twilight 2010: Beyoncé
Beyoncé
Knowles vs. Ali Larter
Ali Larter
– Obsessed 2011: Robert Pattinson
Robert Pattinson
vs. Bryce Dallas Howard
Bryce Dallas Howard
and Xavier Samuel
Xavier Samuel
– The Twilight Saga: Eclipse 2012: Jennifer Lawrence
Jennifer Lawrence
and Josh Hutcherson
Josh Hutcherson
vs. Alexander Ludwig
Alexander Ludwig
– The Hunger Games 2013: Robert Downey Jr., Chris Evans, Mark Ruffalo, Chris Hemsworth, Scarlett Johansson
Scarlett Johansson
and Jeremy Renner
Jeremy Renner
vs. Tom Hiddleston
Tom Hiddleston
– The Avengers 2014: Orlando Bloom
Orlando Bloom
and Evangeline Lilly
Evangeline Lilly
vs. Orcs – The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug 2015: Dylan O'Brien
Dylan O'Brien
vs. Will Poulter
Will Poulter
– The Maze Runner 2016: Ryan Reynolds
Ryan Reynolds
vs. Ed Skrein
Ed Skrein
– Deadpool 2018: Gal Gadot
Gal Gadot
vs. German soldiers – Wonder Woman 2019: Brie Larson
Brie Larson
vs. Gemma Chan
Gemma Chan
– Captain Marvel

vteMTV Movie Award for Best On-Screen TeamBest On-Screen Duo Dana Carvey & Mike Myers
Mike Myers
(1992) Mel Gibson
Mel Gibson
& Danny Glover
Danny Glover
(1993) Harrison Ford
Harrison Ford
& Tommy Lee Jones
Tommy Lee Jones
(1994) Sandra Bullock
Sandra Bullock
& Keanu Reeves
Keanu Reeves
(1995) Chris Farley
Chris Farley
& David Spade
David Spade
(1996) Nicolas Cage
Nicolas Cage
& Sean Connery
Sean Connery
(1997) John Travolta
John Travolta
& Nicolas Cage
Nicolas Cage
(1998) Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
& Chris Tucker
Chris Tucker
(1999) Mike Myers
Mike Myers
& Verne Troyer
Verne Troyer
(2000) Mark Wahlberg
Mark Wahlberg
& Seth MacFarlane
Seth MacFarlane
(2013) Vin Diesel
Vin Diesel
& Paul Walker
Paul Walker
(2014) Zac Efron
Zac Efron
& Dave Franco
Dave Franco
(2015) Hugh Jackman
Hugh Jackman
& Dafne Keen
Dafne Keen
(2017) Best On-Screen Team Drew Barrymore, Cameron Diaz
Cameron Diaz
& Lucy Liu
Lucy Liu
(2001) Vin Diesel
Vin Diesel
& Paul Walker
Paul Walker
(2002) Sean Astin, Andy Serkis
Andy Serkis
& Elijah Wood
Elijah Wood
(2003) Adam Sandler
Adam Sandler
& Drew Barrymore
Drew Barrymore
(2004) Lindsay Lohan, Rachel McAdams, Lacey Chabert
Lacey Chabert
& Amanda Seyfried (2005) Vince Vaughn
Vince Vaughn
& Owen Wilson
Owen Wilson
(2006) Finn Wolfhard, Sophia Lillis, Jaeden Martell, Jack Dylan Grazer, Wyatt Oleff, Jeremy Ray Taylor & Chosen Jacobs (2018) Best Cast Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint, Emma Watson
Emma Watson
& Tom Felton
Tom Felton
(2012)

vte Forbes
Forbes
China Celebrity 100 top 10 (by year)2004 Yao Ming Zhang Ziyi Zhao Wei Faye Wong Gong Li Zhang Yimou Zhou Xun Leon Lai Sun Nan Jet Li 2005 Yao Ming Zhang Ziyi Liu Xiang Zhao Wei Faye Wong Zhang Yimou Zhou Xun Sun Nan Carina Lau Fan Bingbing 2006 Yao Ming Zhou Xun Zhang Ziyi Zhao Wei Liu Xiang Li Yuchun Fan Bingbing Chen Kaige Sun Nan Li Bingbing 2007 Yao Ming Liu Xiang Zhang Yimou Zhang Ziyi Gong Li Zhou Xun Fan Bingbing Li Yuchun Xu Jinglei Carina Lau 2008 Yao Ming Liu Xiang Jet Li Yi Jianlian Zhang Ziyi Fan Bingbing Zhao Wei Zhou Xun Li Bingbing Zhao Benshan 2009 Yao Ming Zhang Ziyi Yi Jianlian Guo Jingjing Liu Xiang Jet Li Zhao Wei Fan Bingbing Zhou Xun Li Bingbing 2010 Jackie Chan Jay Chou Andy Lau Yao Ming Zhang Ziyi Zhao Benshan Jolin Tsai Donnie Yen Liu Xiang Fan Bingbing 2011 Andy Lau Jay Chou Faye Wong Jackie Chan Yao Ming Donnie Yen Zhang Ziyi Jet Li Fan Bingbing Zhao Benshan 2012 Jay Chou Andy Lau Fan Bingbing Faye Wong Li Na Zhao Benshan Jolin Tsai Yao Ming Jackie Chan Lin Chi-ling 2013 Fan Bingbing Jay Chou Andy Lau Jackie Chan Zhang Ziyi Eason Chan Yang Mi Huang Xiaoming Jolin Tsai Lin Chi-ling 2014 Fan Bingbing Andy Lau Jay Chou Huang Xiaoming Zhang Ziyi Yang Mi Lin Chi-ling Li Na Nicky Wu Jackie Chan 2015 Fan Bingbing Jay Chou Nicholas Tse Jackie Chan Huang Xiaoming Sun Li Zhao Wei Andy Lau Li Yifeng Eason Chan 2017 Fan Bingbing Luhan Yang Mi Zhao Liying Yang Yang Liu Tao Jackie Chan Angelababy Jay Chou Kris Wu 2019 Wu Jing Huang Bo Hu Ge Xu Zheng Jay Chou Shen Teng Zhou Dongyu Jackson Yee Yang Mi Kris Wu In 2010, the list started to include Chinese celebrities born in Hong Kong, Taiwan, and other countries. Prior to that it only included celebrities born in mainland China. vteSeven Little Fortunes Yuen Lung Yuen Lou Yuen Biao Yuen Kwei Yuen Wah Yuen Tak Yuen Mo See also: Yuen Qiu China portal Hong Kong
Hong Kong
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WorldCat Identities
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