HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Tangerine
The tangerine ( Citrus
Citrus
tangerina)[1] is a group of orange-colored citrus fruit consisting of hybrids of mandarin orange (Citrus reticulata). The name was first used for fruit coming from Tangier, Morocco, described as a mandarin variety.[2] Under the Tanaka classification system, Citrus
Citrus
tangerina is considered a separate species. Under the Swingle system, tangerines are considered to be a group of mandarin (C. reticulata) varieties.[3] Genetic study has shown tangerines to be mandarin orange hybrids containing some pomelo DNA.[4][5] Some differ only in disease resistance.[6] The term is currently applied to any reddish-orange mandarin[citation needed] (and, in some jurisdictions, mandarin-like hybrids, including some tangors).[7][8]) Tangerines are smaller and less rounded than common oranges
[...More...]

"Tangerine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Vitamin B6
Vitamin
Vitamin
B6 refers to a group of chemically similar compounds which can be interconverted in biological systems. Vitamin
Vitamin
B6 is part of the vitamin B group of essential nutrients
[...More...]

"Vitamin B6" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sugar
Sugar
Sugar
is the generic name for sweet-tasting, soluble carbohydrates, many of which are used in food. There are various types of sugar derived from different sources. Simple sugars are called monosaccharides and include glucose (also known as dextrose), fructose, and galactose. The "table sugar" or "granulated sugar" most customarily used as food is sucrose, a disaccharide of glucose and fructose. Sugar
Sugar
is used in prepared foods (e.g., cookies and cakes) and is added to some foods and beverages (e.g., coffee and tea). In the body, sucrose is hydrolysed into the simple sugars fructose and glucose. Other disaccharides include maltose from malted grain, and lactose from milk. Longer chains of sugars are called oligosaccharides or polysaccharides. Some other chemical substances, such as glycerol and sugar alcohols may also have a sweet taste, but are not classified as sugars
[...More...]

"Sugar" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Taxonomy (biology)
Taxonomy (from Ancient Greek τάξις (taxis), meaning 'arrangement', and -νομία (-nomia), meaning 'method') is the science of defining and naming groups of biological organisms on the basis of shared characteristics. Organisms are grouped together into taxa (singular: taxon) and these groups are given a taxonomic rank; groups of a given rank can be aggregated to form a super-group of higher rank, thus creating a taxonomic hierarchy. The principal ranks in modern use are domain, kingdom, phylum (division is sometimes used in botany in place of phylum), class, order, family, genus and species
[...More...]

"Taxonomy (biology)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tangiers
Tangier
Tangier
(/tænˈdʒɪər/; Arabic: طَنجة‎ Ṭanjah; Berber: ⵟⴰⵏⴵⴰ Ṭanja; old Berber name: ⵜⵉⵏⴳⵉ Tingi; adapted to Latin: Tingis; French: Tanger; Spanish: Tánger; also called Tangiers in English) is a major city in northwestern Morocco. It is located on the Maghreb
Maghreb
coast at the western entrance to the Strait of Gibraltar, where the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
meets the Atlantic Ocean off Cape Spartel. The town is the capital of the Tanger-Tetouan-Al Hoceima
Tanger-Tetouan-Al Hoceima
region, as well as the Tangier-Assilah prefecture of Morocco. Many civilisations and cultures have impacted the history of Tangier starting from before the 5th century BC
[...More...]

"Tangiers" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Zipper
A zipper, zip, fly, or zip fastener, formerly known as a clasp locker, is a commonly used device for binding the edges of an opening of fabric or other flexible material, like on a garment or a bag.[1] It is used in clothing (e.g., jackets and jeans), luggage and other bags, sporting goods, camping gear (e.g. tents and sleeping bags), and other items. Zippers come in all different sizes, shapes, and colors. Whitcomb L. Judson
Whitcomb L. Judson
was an American inventor from Chicago who invented and constructed a workable zipper.[2] The method, still in use today, is based on interlocking teeth
[...More...]

"Zipper" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Alternaria
Many, see text Alternaria
Alternaria
is a genus of ascomycete fungi. Alternaria
Alternaria
species are known as major plant pathogens. They are also common allergens in humans, growing indoors and causing hay fever or hypersensitivity reactions that sometimes lead to asthma. They readily cause opportunistic infections in immunocompromised people such as AIDS patients. There are 299 species in the genus;[1][2] they are ubiquitous in the environment and are a natural part of fungal flora almost everywhere. They are normal agents of decay and decomposition. The spores are airborne and found in the soil and water, as well as indoors and on objects. The club-shaped spores are single or form long chains
[...More...]

"Alternaria" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Florida
Florida
Florida
(/ˈflɒrɪdə/ ( listen); Spanish for "land of flowers") is the southernmost contiguous state in the United States. The state is bordered to the west by the Gulf of Mexico, to the northwest by Alabama, to the north by Georgia, to the east by the Atlantic Ocean, and to the south by the Straits of Florida. Florida
Florida
is the 22nd-most extensive (65,755 sq mi—170,304 km2), the 3rd-most populous (20,984,400 inhabitants),[11] and the 8th-most densely populated (384.3/sq mi—121.0/km2) of the U.S. states. Jacksonville is the most populous municipality in the state and the largest city by area in the contiguous United States. The Miami metropolitan area is Florida's most populous urban area. Tallahassee is the state's capital. About two-thirds of Florida
Florida
occupies a peninsula between the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean
[...More...]

"Florida" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Royal Charles Steadman
Royal Charles Steadman
Royal Charles Steadman
(July 23, 1875 – August 6, 1964) was a botanical illustrator and wax fruit modeler for the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) who also developed a patented method of strengthening wax fruit with plaster on the interior.[1]Contents1 Education and personal life 2 USDA career 3 References 4 External linksEducation and personal life[edit] Royal Charles Steadman
Royal Charles Steadman
was born July 23, 1875, in Portland, Maine, to Alban Charles and Emma Frances Steadman. He had an older brother, Willie. His parents separated and by 1891 his father had remarried and moved to Boston, Massachusetts. Steadman studied art at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, as well as at the Cowles Art School in the same city
[...More...]

"Royal Charles Steadman" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Food Energy
Food
Food
energy is chemical energy that animals (including humans) derive from food through the process of cellular respiration. Cellular respiration may either involve the chemical reaction of food molecules with molecular oxygen[1] (aerobic respiration) or the process of reorganizing the food molecules without additional oxygen (anaerobic respiration).Contents1 Overview 2 Nutrition
Nutrition
labels 3 Recommended daily intake 4 Energy usage in the human body 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksOverview[edit] Humans and other animals need a minimum intake of food energy to sustain their metabolism and to drive their muscles. Foods are composed chiefly of carbohydrates, fats, proteins, water, vitamins, and minerals. Carbohydrates, fats, proteins, and water represent virtually all the weight of food, with vitamins and minerals making up only a small percentage of the weight
[...More...]

"Food Energy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Carbohydrate
A carbohydrate is a biomolecule consisting of carbon (C), hydrogen (H) and oxygen (O) atoms, usually with a hydrogen–oxygen atom ratio of 2:1 (as in water); in other words, with the empirical formula Cm(H2O)n (where m may be different from n).[1] This formula holds true for monosaccharides. Some exceptions exist; for example, deoxyribose, a sugar component of DNA,[2] has the empirical formula C5H10O4.[3] The carbohydrates are technically hydrates of carbon;[4] structurally it is more accurate to view them as aldoses and ketoses .[5] The term is most common in biochemistry, where it is a synonym of 'saccharide', a group that includes sugars, starch, and cellulose. The saccharides are divided into four chemical groups: monosaccharides, disaccharides, oligosaccharides, and polysaccharides
[...More...]

"Carbohydrate" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Dietary Fiber
Dietary fiber
Dietary fiber
or roughage is the indigestible portion of food derived from plants. It has two main components:[1]Soluble fiber, which dissolves in water, is readily fermented in the colon into gases and physiologically active by-products, and can be prebiotic and viscous. This delays gastric emptying which, in humans, can result in an extended feeling of fullness. Insoluble fiber, which does not dissolve in water, is metabolically inert and provides bulking, or it can be fermented in the large intestine
[...More...]

"Dietary Fiber" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Autumn
Autumn, also known as fall in American and Canadian English,[1] is one of the four temperate seasons. Autumn
Autumn
marks the transition from summer to winter, in September (Northern Hemisphere) or March (Southern Hemisphere), when the duration of daylight becomes noticeably shorter and the temperature cools down considerably
[...More...]

"Autumn" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fat
Fat
Fat
is one of the three main macronutrients, along with carbohydrate and protein.[1] Fats, also known as triglycerides, are esters of three fatty acid chains and the alcohol glycerol. The terms "lipid", "oil" and "fat" are often confused. "Lipid" is the general term, though a lipid is not necessarily a triglyceride. "Oil" normally refers to a lipid with short or unsaturated fatty acid chains that is liquid at room temperature, while "fat" (in the strict sense) may specifically refer to lipids that are solids at room temperature – however, "fat" (in the broad sense) may be used in food science as a synonym for lipid. Fats, like other lipids, are generally hydrophobic, and are soluble in organic solvents and insoluble in water. Fat
Fat
is an important foodstuff for many forms of life, and fats serve both structural and metabolic functions. They are a necessary part of the diet of most heterotrophs (including humans)
[...More...]

"Fat" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Protein (nutrient)
Proteins are essential nutrients for the human body.[1] They are one of the building blocks of body tissue and can also serve as a fuel source. As a fuel, proteins provide as much energy density as carbohydrates: 4 kcal (17 kJ) per gram; in contrast, lipids provide 9 kcal (37 kJ) per gram. The most important aspect and defining characteristic of protein from a nutritional standpoint is its amino acid composition.[2] Proteins are polymer chains made of amino acids linked together by peptide bonds. During human digestion, proteins are broken down in the stomach to smaller polypeptide chains via hydrochloric acid and protease actions. This is crucial for the absorption of the essential amino acids that cannot be biosynthesized by the body.[3] There are nine essential amino acids which humans must obtain from their diet in order to prevent protein-energy malnutrition and resulting death
[...More...]

"Protein (nutrient)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Vitamin
A vitamin is an organic compound and an essential nutrient that an organism requires in limited amounts. An organic chemical compound is called a vitamin when the organism cannot make the compound in sufficient quantities, and it must be obtained through the diet; thus, the term vitamin is conditional upon the circumstances and the particular organism. For example, vitamin C is a vitamin for humans, but not most other animals which make enough internally. Vitamin D
Vitamin D
is essential only for people who do not have adequate skin exposure to sunlight, because the ultraviolet light in sunlight normally promotes synthesis of vitamin D
[...More...]

"Vitamin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.