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Palanquin
The litter is a class of wheelless vehicles, a type of human-powered transport, for the transport of persons. Examples of litter vehicles include palki or पालकी (India), পালকি (Bangladesh), lectica (ancient Rome), kiệu (Vietnam, 轎), sedan chair (Britain), litera (Spain), palanquin (France, India), jiao (China, 轎), liteira (Portugal), wo (วอ, Chinese style known as kiao เกี้ยว) (Thailand), gama (Korea), koshi, ren, Norimono, and kago, (Japan, 駕籠), tahtırevan (Turkey) and sankayan (Philippines). Smaller litters may take the form of open chairs or beds carried by two or more carriers, some being enclosed for protection from the elements. Larger litters, for example those of the Chinese emperors, may resemble small rooms upon a platform borne upon the shoulders of a dozen or more people
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England
England
England
is a country that is part of the United Kingdom.[5][6][7] It shares land borders with Wales
Wales
to the west and Scotland
Scotland
to the north-northwest. The Irish Sea lies west of England
England
and the Celtic Sea
Celtic Sea
lies to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe
Europe
by the North Sea
North Sea
to the east and the English Channel
English Channel
to the south
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Ancient Rome
In historiography, ancient Rome
Rome
is Roman civilization from the founding of the city of Rome
Rome
in the 8th century BC to the collapse of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in the 5th century AD, encompassing the Roman Kingdom, Roman Republic
Roman Republic
and Roman Empire
Roman Empire
until the fall of the western empire.[1] The term is sometimes used to just refer to the kingdom and republic periods, excluding the subsequent empire.[2] The civilization began as an Italic settlement in the Italian peninsula, dating from the 8th century BC, that grew into the city of Rome
Rome
and which subsequently gave its name to the empire over which it ruled and to the widespread civilisation the empire developed
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Cabin (ship)
A cabin or berthing is an enclosed space generally on a ship or an aircraft. A cabin which protrudes above the level of a ship's deck may be referred to as a deckhouse.Interior of the great cabin of the 17th century Swedish warship Vasa.Contents1 Sailing ships 2 Modern warships 3 Passenger
Passenger
ships 4 Cabin crawl 5 Spacecraft 6 See also 7 ReferencesSailing ships[edit]Great cabin on the Grand Turk, a replica of a three-masted English 18th century-frigate.Commanding officer’s in-port cabin aboard the American aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN-68).In sailing ships, the officers and paying passengers would have an individual or shared cabin. The captain or commanding officer would occupy the "great cabin" that normally spanned width of the stern with large windows
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London
London
London
(/ˈlʌndən/ ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city of England
England
and the United Kingdom.[7][8] Standing on the River Thames
River Thames
in the south east of the island of Great Britain, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. It was founded by the Romans, who named it Londinium.[9] London's ancient core, the City of London, largely retains its 1.12-square-mile (2.9 km2) medieval boundaries
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Elite
In political and sociological theory, the elite (French élite, from Latin
Latin
eligere) are a small group of powerful people who hold a disproportionate amount of wealth, privilege, political power, or skill in a society.Contents1 Identity and social structure 2 Elitist privilege 3 Power elite 4 Impacts on economy 5 Global politics and hegemony 6 See also 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksIdentity and social structure[edit] American sociologist C. Wright Mills wrote of the "elite" in his 1957 book The Power Elite
The Power Elite
as "those political, economic, and military circles, which as an intricate set of overlapping small but dominant groups share decisions having at least national consequences
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Transport
Transport
Transport
or transportation is the movement of humans, animals and goods from one location to another. Modes of transport
Modes of transport
include air, land (rail and road), water, cable, pipeline and space. The field can be divided into infrastructure, vehicles and operations. Transport
Transport
is important because it enables trade between people, which is essential for the development of civilizations. Transport
Transport
infrastructure consists of the fixed installations including roads, railways, airways, waterways, canals and pipelines and terminals such as airports, railway stations, bus stations, warehouses, trucking terminals, refueling depots (including fueling docks and fuel stations) and seaports
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Link-boy
A link-boy (or link boy or linkboy) was a boy who carried a flaming torch to light the way for pedestrians at night. Linkboys were common in London
London
in the days before street lighting. The linkboy's fee was commonly one farthing, and the torch was often made from burning pitch and tow. Link-boys and their torches also accompanied litter vehicles, known as sedan chairs, that were operated by chairmen.[1] Where possible, the link boys escorted the fares to the chairmen, the passengers then being delivered to the door of their lodgings.[1] Several houses in Bath, UK, still have the link extinguishers on the exteriors, shaped like outsized candle snuffers (see image, right). The term derives from "link", a term for the cotton tow that formed the wick of the torch
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Bath, Somerset
Bath is the largest city in the ceremonial county of Somerset, England, known for its Roman-built baths. In 2011, the population was 88,859.[2] Bath is in the valley of the River Avon, 97 miles (156 km) west of London
London
and 11 miles (18 km) south-east of Bristol. The city became a World Heritage Site
World Heritage Site
in 1987. The city became a spa with the Latin
Latin
name Aquae Sulis
Aquae Sulis
("the waters of Sulis") c.60  AD  when the Romans built baths and a temple in the valley of the River Avon, although hot springs were known even before then. Bath Abbey
Bath Abbey
was founded in the 7th century and became a religious centre; the building was rebuilt in the 12th and 16th centuries. In the 17th century, claims were made for the curative properties of water from the springs, and Bath became popular as a spa town in the Georgian era
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Pharaoh
Pharaoh
Pharaoh
(/ˈfeɪ.roʊ/, /fɛr.oʊ/[1][2] or /fær.oʊ/;[2] Coptic: ⲡⲣ̅ⲣⲟ Prro) is the common title of the monarchs of ancient Egypt from the First Dynasty (c. 3150 BCE) until the annexation of Egypt by the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in 30 BCE,[3] although the actual term "Pharaoh" was not used contemporaneously for a ruler until circa 1200 BCE. In the early dynasty, ancient Egyptian kings used to have up to three titles, the Horus, the Nesu Bety, and the Nebty name. The Golden Horus
Horus
and Nomen and prenomen titles were later added. In Egyptian society, religion was central to everyday life. One of the roles of the pharaoh was as an intermediary between the gods and the people. The pharaoh thus deputised for the gods; his role was both as civil and religious administrator
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Egypt
Coordinates: 26°N 30°E / 26°N 30°E / 26; 30Arab Republic
Republic
of Egyptجمهورية مصر العربيةArabic: Jumhūrīyat Miṣr al-ʿArabīyahEgyptian: Gomhoreyet Maṣr El ʿArabeyahFlagCoat of armsAnthem: "Bilady, Bilady, Bilady" "بلادي، بلادي، بلادي" "My country, my country, my country"Capital and largest city Cairo 30°2′N 31°13′E / 30.033°N 31.217°E / 30.033; 31.217Official languages Arabic[a]National language Egyptian ArabicReligion90% Islam 9% Orthodox Christian 1% Other Christian[1]Demonym EgyptianGovernment Unitary semi-presidential republic• PresidentAbdel Fattah el-Sisi• Prime MinisterSherif IsmailLegislature House of RepresentativesEstablishment• Unification of Upper and Lower Egypt[2][3][b]c
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Krishna
Krishna
Krishna
(/ˈkrɪʃnə/,[8] [ˈkr̩ʂɳə] ( listen); Sanskrit: कृष्ण, translit. Kṛṣṇa) is a major deity in Hinduism. He is worshiped as the eighth avatar of the god Vishnu
Vishnu
and also as the supreme God
God
in his own right.[9] He is the god of compassion, tenderness, and love in Hinduism,[1][2] and is one of the most popular and widely revered among Indian divinities.[10] Krishna's birthday is celebrated every year by Hindus on Janmashtami according to the lunisolar Hindu
Hindu
calendar, which falls in late August or early September of the Gregorian calendar.[11] Krishna
Krishna
is also known by numerous names, such as Govinda, Mukunda, Madhusudhana, Vasudeva, and Makhan chor. The anecdotes and narratives of Krishna's life are generally titled as Krishna
Krishna
Leela
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Book Of Exodus
The Book
Book
of Exodus or, simply, Exodus (from Ancient Greek: ἔξοδος, éxodos, meaning "going out"; Hebrew: וְאֵלֶּה שְׁמוֹת‬, we'elleh shəmōṯ, "These are the names", the beginning words of the text: "These are the names of the sons of Israel" Hebrew: וְאֵלֶּה שְׁמֹות בְּנֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל‬), is the second book of the Torah
Torah
and the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
(the Old Testament) immediately following Genesis.[1] The book tells how the Israelites
Israelites
leave slavery in Egypt through the strength of Yahweh, the God who has chosen Israel as his people
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Third Council Of Braga
The Third Council of Braga was held in 675, during the primacy of Leodegisius, and in the reign of King Wamba
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São Paulo (state)
São Paulo
São Paulo
(Portuguese pronunciation: [sɐ̃w ˈpawlu] ( listen)) is one of the 26 states of the Federative Republic of Brazil
Brazil
and is named after Saint Paul of Tarsus. As the richest Brazilian state and a major industrial complex, often dubbed the "locomotive of Brazil",[7] the state is responsible for 33.9%[8] of the Brazilian GDP. São Paulo
São Paulo
also has the second highest Human Development Index
Human Development Index
(HDI) and GDP
GDP
per capita, the fourth lowest infant mortality rate and the third lowest rate of illiteracy among the federative units of Brazil
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Sedia Gestatoria
The gestatorial chair (sedia gestatoria [ˈsɛːdja dʒestaˈtɔːrja] in Italian, lit. "chair for carrying") was a ceremonial throne on which Popes were carried on shoulders until 1978, and later replaced outdoors in part with the Popemobile. It consists of a richly adorned, silk-covered armchair, fastened on a suppedaneum, on each side of which are two gilded rings; through these rings pass the long rods with which twelve footmen (palafrenieri), in red uniforms, carry the throne on their shoulders. On prior occasions, as in the case of Pope Stephen III, popes were carried on the shoulders of men.[1] The sedia gestatoria is an elaborate variation on the sedan chair
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