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Kshamavani
Kshamavani
Kshamavani
(Sanskrit: Kṣamāvaṇī) or " Forgiveness
Forgiveness
Day" is a day of forgiving and seeking forgiveness for the followers of Jainism. Digambaras celebrate it on the first day of Ashvin Krishna month of the lunar-based Jain
Jain
calendar. Śvētāmbaras celebrate it on Samvatsari, the last day of the annual Paryushana
Paryushana
festival. which coincides with the Chaturthi, 4th day of Shukla Paksha in the holy month of Bhadra.[1] "Micchami Dukkadam" is the common phrase when asking for forgiveness
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Dharma (Jainism)
Dharma
Dharma
(/ˈdɑːrmə/;[8] Sanskrit: धर्म, translit. dharma, pronounced [dʱəɾmə] ( listen); Pali: धम्म, translit. dhamma, translit
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Vengefulness
Revenge
Revenge
is a form of justice enacted in the absence of the norms of formal law and jurisprudence. Often, revenge is defined as being a harmful action against a person or group in response to a grievance, be it real or perceived. It is used to punish a wrong by going outside the law. Francis Bacon
Francis Bacon
described revenge as a kind of "wild justice" that "does..
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Paksha
Paksha (or pakṣa: Sanskrit: पक्ष) refers to a fortnight or a lunar phase in a month of the Hindu lunar calendar.[1][2] Literally meaning "side",[3] a paksha is the period either side of the Full Moon
Full Moon
Day
Day
(Purnima). A lunar month in the Hindu calendar
Hindu calendar
has two fortnights, and begins with the New moon, (Amavasya). The lunar days are called tithis and each month has 30 tithis, which may vary from 20 – 27 hours. A paksha has 15 tithis, which are calculated by a 12 degree motion of the Moon
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Bhadra (Hindu Calendar)
Bhadra or Bhadrapada or Bhaado or Bhadraba (Hindi: भादों bhaado, Sanskrit: भाद्रपद bhaadrapada, Nepali: भाद्र Bhadra , Odia: ଭାଦ୍ରବ Bhadraba ) is a month of the Hindu calendar
Hindu calendar
that corresponds to August/September in the Gregorian calendar.[1] In India's national civil calendar (Shaka calendar), Bhadra is the sixth month of the year, beginning on 17 August and ending on 16 September. In Vedic Jyotish, Bhadra begins with the Sun's entry into Leo, and is usually the month of the year. In Nepal's Bikram Sambat, Bhadra is the fifth month. In lunar religious calendars, Bhadra begins on the new moon in August/September and is the sixth month of the year. The festival of Ganesha
Ganesha
Chaturthi, celebrating the birthday of Ganesha, is observed from the 4-10 Bhadrapada in the bright fortnight and is the main holiday of the year in Maharashtra
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Jain
Jainism
Jainism
(/ˈdʒeɪnɪzəm/),[1] traditionally known as Jain
Jain
Dharma,[2] is an ancient Indian religion.[3] Followers of Jainism
Jainism
are called "Jains", a word derived from the Sanskrit word jina (victor) and connoting the path of victory in crossing over life's stream of rebirths through an ethical and spiritual life.[4] Jains
Jains
trace their history through a succession of twenty-four victorious saviors and teachers known as tirthankaras, with the first being Rishabhanatha, who is believed to have lived millions of years ago, and twenty-fourth being the Mahāvīra
Mahāvīra
around 500 BCE
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Siddhasena
Siddhasēna Divākara (Jain Prakrit: सिद्दसेन दिवाकर) was an Digambara
Digambara
monk in the fifth century CE who wrote works on Jain philosophy
Jain philosophy
and epistemology.[1] He was like the illuminating lamp of the Jain order and therefore came to be known as Divākara "Lamp-Maker". He is credited with the authorship of many books, most of which are not available. Sanmatitarka (‘The Logic of the True Doctrine’) is the first major Jain work on logic written in Sanskrit.[2][3]Contents1 Life 2 Thought 3 Works 4 Notes 5 ReferencesLife[edit] Siddhasena
Siddhasena
Divakara is said to have lived from 500 CE to 610 CE. He was a Brahmin by birth and a scholar. He was initiated by Acharya Vruddhavadi.[4] According to the tradition, Siddhasena
Siddhasena
Divakara once planned to translate all the Jaina works from prakrit to Sanskrit
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Sallekhana
Sallekhana
Sallekhana
(IAST: sallekhanā), also known as Samlehna, Santhara, Samadhi-marana or Sanyasana-marana;[1] is a supplementary vow to the ethical code of conduct of Jainism
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Tirthankara
In Jainism, a tirthankara (Sanskrit: tīrthaṅkara; English: literally a 'Ford-maker') is a saviour and spiritual teacher of the dharma (righteous path).[1] The word tirthankara signifies the founder of a tirtha[2], which is a fordable passage across the sea of interminable births and deaths, the saṃsāra. According to Jains, a tirthankara is a rare individual who has conquered the saṃsāra, the cycle of death and rebirth, on his own and made a path for others to follow. After understanding the true nature of the Self or soul, the Tīrthaṅkara attains Kevala Jnana
Kevala Jnana
(omniscience), and the first Tirthankara
Tirthankara
refounds Jainism
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Rishabhanatha
Rushabhanatha or Rishabhanatha
Rishabhanatha
(also Ṛṣabhadeva, Rushabhadeva, Rishabhadeva, or Ṛṣabha which literally means "bull") is the first Tirthankara
Tirthankara
(ford maker) in Jainism.[5][6] Jain legends depict him as having lived millions of years ago.[7][4] He was the first of twenty four lords in the present half cycle of time in Jain cosmology, and called a ford maker because his teachings helped one across the sea of interminable rebirths and deaths (saṃsāra)
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Parshvanatha
Parshvanatha
Parshvanatha
(Pārśvanātha), also known as Parshva (Pārśva), was the 23rd of 24 Tirthankaras (ford-maker, teacher) of Jainism.[6] He is the earliest Jain Tirthankara
Tirthankara
who is generally acknowledged as a historical figure.[7][8] His biography is uncertain, with Jain sources placing him between the 9th and 8th century BC, and historians stating he may have lived in 8th or 7th century BC
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Mahavira
Mahavira
Mahavira
(/məˌhɑːˈvɪərə/; IAST: Bhagavān Mahāvīra), also known as Vardhamāna, was the twenty-fourth Tirthankara
Tirthankara
(ford-maker) of Jainism. In the Jain tradition, it is believed that Mahavira
Mahavira
was born in the early part of the 6th century BC into a royal family in what is now Bihar, India. At the age of thirty, abandoning all worldly possessions, he left his home in pursuit of spiritual awakening and became an ascetic. For the next twelve and a half years, Mahavira
Mahavira
practiced intense meditation and severe austerities, after which he is believed to have attained Kevala Jnana
Kevala Jnana
(omniscience). He preached for thirty years, and is believed by Jains to have died in the 6th century BC
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Arihant (Jainism)
Arihant (Jain Prakrit: arihant, Sanskrit: árhat "conqueror"), is a soul who has conquered inner passions such as attachment, anger, pride and greed.[1] Arihant are also called kevalins (omniscient beings) as they possess Kevala Jnana
Kevala Jnana
(pure infinite knowledge).[2][3] An arihant is also called a jina "victor". At the end of their life, arihants destroy all four gathiya karmas and attain moksha (liberation) and become siddhas, liberated souls
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Ganadhara
In Jainism, the term Ganadhara
Ganadhara
is used to refer the chief disciple of a Tirthankara. In samavasarana, the Tīrthankara sat on a throne without touching it (about two inches above it).[1] Around, the Tīrthankara sits the Ganadharas.[2] According to Digambara
Digambara
tradition, only a disciple of exceptional brilliance and accomplishment (riddhi) is able to fully assimilate, without doubt, delusion, or misapprehension, the anekanta teachings of a Tirthankara.[3] The presence of such a disciple is mandatory in the samavasarana before Tirthankara
Tirthankara
delivers his sermons
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Kundakunda
Acharya
Acharya
Kundakunda
Kundakunda
is a revered Digambara
Digambara
Jain monk and philosopher. He authored many Jain texts
Jain texts
such as: Samayasara, Niyamasara, Pancastikayasara, Pravachanasara, Atthapahuda and Barasanuvekkha. He occupies the highest place in the tradition of the Digambara
Digambara
Jain acharyas, a position comparable to Christ in Christianity and Muhammad in Islam. All Digambara
Digambara
Jains say his name before starting to read the scripture
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Yashovijaya
Yashovijaya
Yashovijaya
(IAST: Yaśovijaya, 1624–1688), a seventeenth-century Jain philosopher-monk, was a notable Indian philosopher and logician. He was a thinker, prolific writer and commentator who had a strong and lasting influence on Jainism.[1] He was a disciple of Muni Nayavijaya in the lineage of Jain monk Hiravijaya
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