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Lancaster, ( ;
Pennsylvania German The Pennsylvania Dutch (), translated from German to English as Pennsylvania Germans, are a cultural group formed by German immigrants settling in the state of Pennsylvania Pennsylvania ( , elsewhere ; pdc, Pennsilfaani), officially t ...
: ''Lengeschder'') also known as the Red Rose City is a city in
South Central Pennsylvania South Central Pennsylvania is a region of the U.S. state In the United States The United States of America (U.S.A. or USA), commonly known as the United States (U.S. or US) or America, is a country Continental United States, prima ...
, that serves as the
seat SEAT S.A. (, ; ''Sociedad Española de Automóviles de Turismo'') is a Spanish car manufacturer, which sells its vehicles under the SEAT and Cupra brands. It was founded on 9 May 1950, by the Instituto Nacional de Industria Instituto Nacional d ...
of
Pennsylvania Pennsylvania ( , elsewhere ; pdc, Pennsilfaani), officially the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, is a landlocked A landlocked country is a country that does not have territory connected to an ocean or whose coastlines lie on endorheic basi ...

Pennsylvania
's Lancaster County and is one of the oldest inland towns in the United States. With a population at the
2010 census2010 census may refer to: * 2010 Chinese Census * 2010 Dominican Republic Census * 2010 Indonesian census * 2010 Malaysian Census * 2010 Russian Census * 2010 Turkish census * 2010 United States Census * 2010 Zambian census {{Disambiguation ...
of 59,322, it ranks eighth in population among Pennsylvania's cities. The Lancaster
metropolitan area A metropolitan area or metro is a region consisting of a densely populated urban core Urban means "related to a city". In that sense, the term may refer to: * Urban area, geographical area distinct from rural areas * Urban culture, the cul ...
population is 507,766, making it the 104th-largest metropolitan area in the U.S. and second-largest in the South Central Pennsylvania area. The city's primary industries include healthcare, tourism, public administration, manufacturing, and both professional and semi-professional services. Lancaster is best known for being the hub of Pennsylvania's Amish Country.


History

Originally called Hickory Town, the city was renamed after the English city of
LancasterLancaster may refer to: Lands and titles *The County Palatine of Lancaster, a synonym for Lancashire *Duchy of Lancaster, one of only two British royal duchies *Duke of Lancaster *Earl of Lancaster *House of Lancaster, a British royal dynasty ...
by native John Wright. Its symbol, the , is from the
House of Lancaster The House of Lancaster was a cadet branch of the royal House of Plantagenet. The first house was created when King Henry III of England created the Earldom of Lancasterfrom which the house was namedfor his second son Edmund Crouchback in 126 ...
. Lancaster was part of the 1681 Penn's Woods Charter of
William Penn William Penn (14 October 1644 – 30 July 1718) was an English writer A writer is a person who uses written words in different styles and techniques to communicate ideas. Writers produce different forms of literary art and creative wri ...

William Penn
, and was laid out by James Hamilton in 1734. It was incorporated as a borough in 1742 and incorporated as a city in 1818. During the
American Revolution The American Revolution was an ideological and political revolution which occurred in colonial North America between 1765 and 1783. The Americans in the Thirteen Colonies The Thirteen Colonies, also known as the Thirteen British Colo ...
, Lancaster was the capital of the United States for one day at the Court House (built 1739, destroyed by fire 1784 and rebuilt before relocating to current Lancaster County Courthouse in 1852; original site is now the Soldiers & Sailors Monument at Penn Square c. 1874), on September 27, 1777, after the
Continental Congress The Continental Congress was a series of legislative bodies A legislature is a deliberative assembly A deliberative assembly is a gathering of members (of any kind of collective) who use parliamentary procedure Parliamentary procedure is ...
fled
Philadelphia Philadelphia (colloquially known simply as Philly) is the largest city in the Commonwealth A commonwealth is a traditional English term for a political community founded for the common good In philosophy Philosophy (from , ) is ...

Philadelphia
, which had been captured by the British. The revolutionary government then moved still farther away to
York, Pennsylvania York (Pennsylvania German language, Pennsylvania German: ''Yarrick''), known as the White Rose City (after the White Rose of York, symbol of the House of York), is the county seat of York County, Pennsylvania, United States, located in the South ...

York, Pennsylvania
.City of Lancaster, PA
Lancaster was capital of Pennsylvania from 1799 to 1812 with State Capital meeting at the Court House (built 1784 and demolished 1852 and now site of Soldiers & Sailors Monument at Penn Square), after which the capital was moved to
Harrisburg Harrisburg ( ; Pennsylvania German language, Pennsylvania German: ''Harrisbarrig'') is the capital city of the Pennsylvania, Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in the United States, and the county seat of Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, Dauphin Count ...
. In 1851, the current
Lancaster County PrisonThe Lancaster County Prison is a county prison A prison (also known as a jail or gaol (dated, British, Australian, and to a lesser extent Canadian Canadians (french: Canadiens) are people identified with the country of Canada. This co ...
- known locally as Lancaster Castle - was built in the city, but shares no visual similarities with the
Lancaster Castle Lancaster Castle is a medieval castle A castle is a type of fortification, fortified structure built during the Middle Ages predominantly by the nobility or royalty and by Military order (monastic society), military orders. Scholars de ...

Lancaster Castle
in England. The prison remains in use, and was used for public hangings until 1912. It replaced a 1737 structure on a . The first long-distance paved road in the United States was the former
Philadelphia and Lancaster Turnpike The Philadelphia and Lancaster Turnpike, first used in 1795, is the first long-distance paved road built in the United States The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States (U.S. or US), or America, is a country Co ...
, which connected the cities of Lancaster and Philadelphia. Opened in 1795, the turnpike was paved with stone the whole way, and overlaid with gravel. The sixty-two-mile turnpike cost more than $450,000, a staggering sum for the time. The route followed what is now
Pennsylvania Route 340 Pennsylvania Route 340 (PA 340) is a state highway located in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, Lancaster and Chester County, Pennsylvania, Chester counties in Pennsylvania. The western terminus is at Pennsylvania Route 462, PA 462 in Lan ...
(also called the "Old Philadelphia Pike") from Lancaster to Thorndale and U.S. Route 30 Business and
U.S. Route 30 U.S. Route 30 or U.S. Highway 30 (US 30) is an east–west main route in the system of the United States Numbered Highways The United States Numbered Highway System (often called U.S. Routes or U.S. Highways) is an integrated networ ...
from Thorndale to Philadelphia. The city of Lancaster was home to several important figures in American history. Wheatland, the estate of
James Buchanan James Buchanan Jr. ( ; April 23, 1791June 1, 1868) was an American lawyer and politician who served as the 15th president of the United States The president of the United States (POTUS) is the and of the . The president directs the ...

James Buchanan
, the fifteenth President of the United States, is one of Lancaster's most popular attractions.
Thaddeus Stevens Thaddeus Stevens (April 4, 1792August 11, 1868) was a member of the United States House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives is the lower house of the United States Congress, with the United States Senate, Senate ...

Thaddeus Stevens
, considered among the most powerful members of the
United States House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives is the lower house of the United States Congress, with the United States Senate, Senate being the upper house. Together they compose the national Bicameralism, bicameral legislature of the United S ...
, lived in Lancaster as an attorney. Stevens gained notoriety as a
Radical Republican The Radical Republicans were a faction of American politicians within the Republican Party of the United States The Republican Party, also referred to as the GOP ("Grand Old Party"), is one of the two major Major is a military ran ...
and for his
abolitionism Abolitionism, or the abolitionist movement, was the movement to end slavery Slavery and enslavement are both the state and the condition of being a slave, who is someone forbidden to quit their service for an enslaver, and who is t ...
. The
Fulton Opera House The Fulton Opera Opera is a form of theatre in which music is a fundamental component and dramatic roles are taken by Singing, singers, but is distinct from musical theatre. Such a "work" (the literal translation of the Italian word "opera") ...

Fulton Opera House
in the city was named for Lancaster native
Robert Fulton Robert Fulton (November 14, 1765 – February 24, 1815) was an American engineer Engineers, as practitioners of engineering Engineering is the use of scientific principles to design and build machines, structures, and other items, ...

Robert Fulton
, a renaissance man who created the first fully functional steamboat. All of these individuals have had local schools named after them. After the American Revolution, the city of Lancaster became an iron-foundry center. Two of the most common products needed by pioneers to settle the Frontier were manufactured in Lancaster: the
Conestoga wagon The Conestoga wagon is a specific design of heavy covered wagon The covered wagon, also called the prairie schooner, was a vehicle usually made out of wood Wood is a porous and fibrous structural tissue found in the Plant stem, stems a ...

Conestoga wagon
and the
Pennsylvania long rifle The long rifle, also known as longrifle, Kentucky rifle, Pennsylvania rifle, or American longrifle, was one of the first commonly used rifles for hunting and warfare. It is characterized by an unusually long barrel, a development in American rif ...
. The Conestoga wagon was named after the
Conestoga River The Conestoga River, also referred to as Conestoga Creek, is a U.S. Geological Survey. National Hydrography Dataset high-resolution flowline dataThe National Map, accessed August 8, 2011 tributary of the Susquehanna River flowing through the cente ...
, which runs through the city. The innovative gunsmith William Henry lived in Lancaster and was a U.S. congressman and leader during and after the American Revolution. In 1803,
Meriwether Lewis Meriwether Lewis (August 18, 1774 – October 11, 1809) was an American explorer Exploration is the act of searching for the purpose of discovery Discovery may refer to: * Discovery (observation) Discovery is the act of detecting somet ...

Meriwether Lewis
visited Lancaster to be educated in survey methods by the well-known surveyor
Andrew Ellicott Andrew Ellicott (January 24, 1754 – August 28, 1820) was an American land surveyor Surveying or land surveying is the technique, profession, art, and science of determining the terrestrial or three-dimensional positions of points and ...

Andrew Ellicott
. During his visit, Lewis learned to plot latitude and longitude as part of his overall training needed to lead the
Lewis and Clark Expedition The Lewis and Clark Expedition from August 31, 1803, to September 25, 1806, also known as the Corps of Discovery Expedition, was the United States expedition to cross the newly acquired western portion of the country after the Louisiana Pur ...
. In 1879,
Franklin Winfield Woolworth Frank Winfield Woolworth (April 13, 1852 – April 8, 1919) was an American entrepreneur, the founder of F. W. Woolworth Company, and the operator of variety stores known as "Five-and-Dimes" (5- and 10-cent stores or dime stores) which featured ...
opened his first successful "
five and dime A variety store (also five and dime (historic), pound shop, or dollar store) is a retail store Retail is the sale of goods In economics Economics () is a social science Social science is the branch A branch ( ...

five and dime
" store in the city of Lancaster, the
F. W. Woolworth Company The F. W. Woolworth Company (often referred to as Woolworth's or Woolworth) was a retail company and one of the pioneers of the five-and-dime store. It was among the most successful American and international five-and-dime businesses, setting t ...
. Lancaster was one of the winning communities for the
All-America City The All-America City Award is a community recognition program in the United States The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States (U.S. or US), or America, is a country Contiguous United States, primarily located ...
award in 2000. On October 13, 2011, Lancaster's City Council officially recognized September 27 as Capital Day, a holiday recognizing Lancaster's one day as capital of the United States in 1777.


Geography

Lancaster is located at 40°02'23" North, 76°18'16" West (40.039860, −76.304366), and is above sea level in the Piedmont region of
Pennsylvania Pennsylvania ( , elsewhere ; pdc, Pennsilfaani), officially the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, is a landlocked A landlocked country is a country that does not have territory connected to an ocean or whose coastlines lie on endorheic basi ...

Pennsylvania
. The city is located about southeast of
Harrisburg Harrisburg ( ; Pennsylvania German language, Pennsylvania German: ''Harrisbarrig'') is the capital city of the Pennsylvania, Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in the United States, and the county seat of Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, Dauphin Count ...
, west of
Philadelphia Philadelphia (colloquially known simply as Philly) is the largest city in the Commonwealth A commonwealth is a traditional English term for a political community founded for the common good In philosophy Philosophy (from , ) is ...

Philadelphia
, north-northeast of
Baltimore Baltimore ( , locally: ) is the most populous city The United Nations uses three definitions for what constitutes a city, as not all cities in all jurisdictions are classified using the same criteria. Cities may be defined as the city prop ...

Baltimore
and northeast of
Washington, D.C. ) , image_skyline = , image_caption = Clockwise from top left: the Washington Monument The Washington Monument is an obelisk within the National Mall The National Mall is a Landscape architecture, landscape ...
The nearest towns and boroughs are Millersville (4.0 miles), Willow Street (4.8 miles), East Petersburg (5.3 miles), Lititz (7.9 miles), Landisville (8.6 miles), Mountville (8.8 miles), Rothsville (8.9 miles), and Leola (8.9 miles). According to the
United States Census Bureau The United States Census Bureau (USCB), officially the Bureau of the Census, is a principal agency of the U.S. Federal Statistical System, responsible for producing data about the American American(s) may refer to: * American, something of, ...
, the city has a total area of , of which, of it is land and 0.14% is water.


Climate

Under the
Köppen climate classification The Köppen climate classification is one of the most widely used climate classification Climate classification is a way of categorizing the world's s. A climate classification may correlate closely with a category, as climate is a major infl ...
, Lancaster falls within either a
hot-summer humid continental climate A humid continental climate is a climate, climatic region defined by Russo-German climatologist Wladimir Köppen in 1900, typified by four distinct seasons and large seasonal temperature differences, with warm to hot (and often humid) summers and ...
(''Dfa'') if the isotherm is used or a
humid subtropical climate A humid subtropical climate is a zone of climate characterized by hot and humid summers, and cool to mild winters. These climates normally lie on the southeast side of all continents, generally between latitude In geography Geograp ...
(''Cfa'') if the isotherm is used. The hottest recorded temperature in the city was on July 23, 2011, while the coldest recorded temperature was on January 22, 1984. On average, the city receives 42 inches of precipitation a year. September is the wettest month of the year and February the driest. The snowiest winter on record for Lancaster was the winter of 2009-10 when 72 inches of snow fell and the smallest amount of snow on record was when four inches fell during the winter of 1949–50. The highest recorded January temperature was on January 26, 1950, and the coldest July temperature on July 4, 1918. On average, the city receives 203 days of sun a year. The shortest days of the year are between December 18 and December 25, when day length is nine hours and 19 minutes. The sun reaches its lowest point in the sky of 26° between December 11 and December 31. The longest days of the year are June 19 to June 23, reaching 15 hours and one minute. The sun reaches its highest point in the sky of 73° from June 10 to July 2.


Demographics

As of the 2010 census, the city was 55.2%
White White is the lightest color Color (American English American English (AmE, AE, AmEng, USEng, en-US), sometimes called United States English or U.S. English, is the set of varieties of the English language native to the Unite ...
, 16.3%
Black or African American Black is a color which results from the absence or complete Absorption (electromagnetic radiation), absorption of visible spectrum, visible light. It is an achromatic color, without hue, like white and gray. It is often used symbolically or fig ...

Black or African American
, 0.7%
Native American Native Americans may refer to: Ethnic groups * Indigenous peoples of the Americas, the pre-Columbian peoples of North and South America and their descendants * Native Americans in the United States * Indigenous peoples in Canada, the indigenous p ...
, 3.0%
Asian Asian may refer to: * Items from or related to the continent of Asia: ** Asian people, people in or descending from Asia ** Asian culture, the culture of the people from Asia ** Asian cuisine, food based on the style of food of the people from Asi ...
, 0.1%
Native Hawaiian Native Hawaiians, or simply Hawaiians ( haw, kānaka ʻōiwi, , and ), are the Indigenous Indigenous may refer to: *Indigenous peoples Indigenous peoples, also referred to as First people, Aboriginal people, Native people, or autochthonou ...
, and 5.8% were two or more races. 39.3% of the population were of
Hispanic The term ''Hispanic'' ( es, hispano) refers to people, cultures Culture () is an umbrella term which encompasses the social behavior Social behavior is behavior Behavior (American English) or behaviour (British English; American and ...
or
Latino Latino or Latinos most often refers to: * Latino (demonym), a term used in the United States for people with cultural ties to Latin America * Hispanic and Latino Americans in the United States * The people or cultures of Latin America; ** Latin Am ...

Latino
ancestry. As of the
census A census is the procedure of systematically calculating, acquiring and recording information Information is processed, organised and structured data Data (; ) are individual facts, statistics, or items of information, often numeric. In ...

census
of 2000, there were 56,348 people, 20,933 households, and 12,162 families residing in the city. The
population density Population density (in agriculture Agriculture is the science, art and practice of cultivating plants and livestock. Agriculture was the key development in the rise of sedentary Image:Family watching television 1958.jpg, Exercise tr ...

population density
was 7,616.5 people per square mile (2,940.0/km2). There were 23,024 housing units at an average density of 3,112.1 per square mile (1,201.3/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 61.55%
White White is the lightest color Color (American English American English (AmE, AE, AmEng, USEng, en-US), sometimes called United States English or U.S. English, is the set of varieties of the English language native to the Unite ...
, 14.09%
African American African Americans (also referred to as Black Americans or Afro-Americans) are an ethnic group An ethnic group or ethnicity is a grouping of people A people is any plurality of person A person (plural people or persons) is a being t ...
, 0.44%
Native American Native Americans may refer to: Ethnic groups * Indigenous peoples of the Americas, the pre-Columbian peoples of North and South America and their descendants * Native Americans in the United States * Indigenous peoples in Canada, the indigenous p ...
, 2.46%
Asian Asian may refer to: * Items from or related to the continent of Asia: ** Asian people, people in or descending from Asia ** Asian culture, the culture of the people from Asia ** Asian cuisine, food based on the style of food of the people from Asi ...
, 0.08%
Pacific Islander Pacific Islanders, Pacificer, Pasifika, or Pasefika, are the peoples of the Pacific Islands This is a list of islands in the Pacific Ocean, collectively called the Pacific Islands. Three major groups of island An island (or isle) ...
, 17.44% from
other races Other most often refers to: * Other (philosophy), a concept in psychology and philosophy Other or The Other may also refer to: Books * The Other (Tryon novel), ''The Other'' (Tryon novel), a 1971 horror novel by Tom Tryon * The Other (short story ...
, and 3.94% from two or more races. 30.76% of the population were
Hispanic The term ''Hispanic'' ( es, hispano) refers to people, cultures Culture () is an umbrella term which encompasses the social behavior Social behavior is behavior Behavior (American English) or behaviour (British English; American and ...
or
Latino Latino or Latinos most often refers to: * Latino (demonym), a term used in the United States for people with cultural ties to Latin America * Hispanic and Latino Americans in the United States * The people or cultures of Latin America; ** Latin Am ...
people of any race.


Ethnic groups

The largest ethnic groups in Lancaster as of recent estimates are: * Puerto Rican 29.2% *
German German(s) may refer to: * Germany (of or related to) **Germania (historical use) * Germans, citizens of Germany, people of German ancestry, or native speakers of the German language ** For citizens of Germany, see also German nationality law **Ger ...
21.2% *
African American African Americans (also referred to as Black Americans or Afro-Americans) are an ethnic group An ethnic group or ethnicity is a grouping of people A people is any plurality of person A person (plural people or persons) is a being t ...

African American
12.8% *
Irish Irish most commonly refers to: * Someone or something of, from, or related to: ** Ireland Ireland ( ; ga, Éire ; Ulster Scots dialect, Ulster-Scots: ) is an island in the Atlantic Ocean, North Atlantic. It is separated from Great Britai ...
8.6% *
English English usually refers to: * English language English is a West Germanic languages, West Germanic language first spoken in History of Anglo-Saxon England, early medieval England, which has eventually become the World language, leading lan ...
8.2% *
Italian Italian may refer to: * Anything of, from, or related to the people of Italy Italy ( it, Italia ), officially the Italian Republic ( it, Repubblica Italiana, links=no ), is a country consisting of a peninsula delimited by the Alps ...
4.1% *
Dominican Dominican may refer to: * Someone or something from or related to the Dominican Republic The Dominican Republic ( ; es, República Dominicana, ) is a country located on the island of Hispaniola in the Greater Antilles archipelago of the C ...
3.2% *
Polish Polish may refer to: * Anything from or related to Poland Poland, officially the Republic of Poland, is a country located in Central Europe. It is divided into 16 Voivodeships of Poland, administrative provinces, covering an area of , ...
2.0% *
Scottish Scottish usually refers to something of, from, or related to Scotland, including: *Scottish Gaelic, a Celtic Goidelic language of the Indo-European language family native to Scotland *Scottish English *Scottish national identity, the Scottish iden ...
1.9% *
Mexican Mexican may refer to: Mexico and its culture *Being related to, from, or connected to the country of Mexico, in North America ** Being related to the State of Mexico, one of the 32 federal entities of Mexico ** Culture of Mexico *** Mexican cuisi ...
1.8% *
Cuban Cuban may refer to: * Something of, from, or related to Cuba, a country in the Caribbean * Cubans, people from Cuba, or of Cuban descent ** Cuban exile, a person who left Cuba for political reasons, or a descendant thereof * Cuban citizen, a person ...
1.7% *
West Indian A West Indian is a native Native may refer to: People * Jus soli, citizenship by right of birth * Indigenous peoples, peoples with a set of specific rights based on their historical ties to a particular territory ** Native Americans (disambigu ...
1.0% In 2010, 29.2% of Lancaster residents were of Puerto Rican ancestry. The city has the second highest concentration of Puerto Ricans in Pennsylvania after
Reading Reading is the process of taking in the sense or meaning of letters, symbols, ''etc.'', especially by sight or touch. For educators and researchers, reading is a multifaceted process involving such areas as word recognition, orthography An ...
. For this reason, it is sometimes referred to as the "Spanish Rose." Lancaster celebrates its Puerto Rican heritage once every year with the Puerto Rican Festival. There were 20,933 households, out of which 31.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 33.4% were
married couples Marriage, also called matrimony or wedlock is a culturally and often legally recognized union between people called spouse A spouse is a significant other in a marriage (in certain contexts, it can also apply to a civil union or comm ...

married couples
living together, 19.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 41.9% were non-families. 33.1% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 3.23. In the city, the population was spread out, with 27.5% under the age of 18, 13.9% from 18 to 24, 30.5% from 25 to 44, 17.7% from 45 to 64, and 10.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 30 years. For every 100 females, there were 95.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.4 males. The median income for a household in the city was $29,770, and the median income for a family was $34,623. Males had a median income of $27,833 versus $21,862 for females. The
per capita income Per capita income (PCI) or total income measures the average income earned per person in a given area (city, region, country, etc.) in a specified year. It is calculated by dividing the area's total income by its total population. Per capita i ...
for the city was $13,955. 21.2% of the population and 17.9% of families were below the
poverty line The poverty threshold, poverty limit, poverty line or breadline is the minimum level of income In microeconomics, income is the Consumption (economics), consumption and saving opportunity gained by an entity within a specified timeframe, w ...
. 29.2% of those under the age of 18 and 12.9% of those 65 and older were living below the poverty line. Poverty in Lancaster is twice the state's average, and public school records list more than 900 children as homeless. Although there are many
Amish The Amish (; pdc, Amisch; german: Amische) are a group of traditionalist Christian church fellowships with Swiss German Swiss German (Standard German Standard High German (SHG), less precisely Standard German or High German (not to ...

Amish
people from this area, not everyone from Lancaster is Amish, contrary to popular belief.


Economy

Lancaster City has been in the process of recreating itself, particularly since 2005, with a growth of specialty shops, boutiques, bars, clubs, and reinvestment in downtown institutions and locations. In 2005 the creation of "Gallery Row" solidified the status of Lancaster as an arts destination. The art community continues to thrive and expand. There are also plans to convert an area of unused polluted industrial grounds (i.e.,
brownfields In urban planning Urban planning, also known as regional planning, town planning, city planning, or rural planning, is a technical and political process that is focused on the development and design A design is a plan or specification ...
), which were once occupied by
Armstrong World Industries Armstrong World Industries, Inc. is a Pennsylvania corporation incorporated in 1891. It is an international designer and manufacturer of walls and ceilings. Based in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, AWI has a global manufacturing network of 26 facilities, ...
, into playing fields for
Franklin & Marshall College Franklin & Marshall College (F&M) is a Private college, private Liberal arts colleges in the United States, liberal arts college in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. It employs 175 full-time faculty members and has a student body of approximately 2,400 ...

Franklin & Marshall College
. This action is expected to take up most of the former industrial site. The Northwest Corridor will be developed with funds from
Lancaster General Hospital Lancaster General Health is a regional health system in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. It is part of the University of Pennsylvania Health System. Its flagship hospital is Lancaster General Hospital. Founded in 1893 in a small home on Queen Street, the ...
. The hospital plans to create a mixed-use development which will add several city blocks to Lancaster's grid. Another brownfield site is Burle Business Park, the city's only commercial and industrial park. Devoted to adaptive re-use, this facility originally opened in 1942 as a
U.S. Navy ), (unofficial)."''Non sibi sed patriae''" ( en, "Not for self but for country") (unofficial). , colors = Blue and gold  , colors_label = Colors , march = " Anchors Aweigh" ...
electronics research, development and manufacturing plant that was operated by
RCA The RCA Corporation was a major American electronics company, which was founded as the Radio Corporation of America in 1919. It was initially a patent trust owned by General Electric General Electric Company (GE) is an American multinatio ...
. The Navy facility was purchased after World War II by RCA. Burle Business Park was originally occupied by Burle Industries, the successor company to the RCA New Products Division following the 1986 acquisition of RCA by
General Electric Company The General Electric Company, or GEC, was a major British industrial conglomerate involved in consumer and defence Defense or defence may refer to: Tactical, martial, and political acts or groups * Defense (military) A military, als ...
(GE). The GE acquisition of RCA resulted in the divestiture of this facility and the electronic business, but GE retained certain environmental liabilities that were subdivided into a separate parcel. Burle Industries is a major manufacturer of vacuum tube products, including photomultiplier tubes, power tubes, and imaging tubes. and is the largest U.S. manufacturer of photomultiplier tubes. Burle Industries has completed a voluntary clean-up under the Pennsylvania Land Recycling Program ("Act 2").


Shopping

In addition to Lancaster's boutiques, vintage shops, and art galleries (Gallery Row),
Park City Center Park City Center is a shopping mall located in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and is the largest enclosed shopping center in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, Lancaster County. It is situated at the intersection of U.S. Route 30 in Pennsylvania, U.S. Route ...
is the largest enclosed shopping center in
South Central Pennsylvania South Central Pennsylvania is a region of the U.S. state In the United States The United States of America (U.S.A. or USA), commonly known as the United States (U.S. or US) or America, is a country Continental United States, prima ...
. The mall includes more than 150 stores and is anchored by
Boscov's Boscov's Inc. is a family-owned department store with 50 locations in Pennsylvania, New York (state), New York, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Ohio, Connecticut, and Rhode Island. Most stores are located in Pennsylvania. The company chairman is J ...
,
JCPenney Penney OpCo, LLC (formerly known as J. C. Penney Company, Inc; doing business as JCPenney and abbreviated JCP) is a midscale American department store A department store is a retail Retail is the sale of goods In economics Ec ...

JCPenney
, and
Kohl's Kohl's is an American department store retail chain store, chain, operated by Kohl's Corporation. it is the largest department store chain in the United States, with 1,158 locations, operating stores in every U.S. state except Hawaii. The comp ...

Kohl's
. Park City opened in September 1971. Built in 1889, the Lancaster Central Market is the oldest continuously operated
farmers market A farmers' market (or farmers market according to the AP stylebook The ''AP Stylebook'', also known by its full name ''The Associated Press Stylebook and Briefing on Media Law'', is an American-English grammar style and usage guide created b ...
in the United States, and many tourists come to purchase the handmade
Amish The Amish (; pdc, Amisch; german: Amische) are a group of traditionalist Christian church fellowships with Swiss German Swiss German (Standard German Standard High German (SHG), less precisely Standard German or High German (not to ...

Amish
goods that are not commonly found elsewhere. Central Market is listed with the
National Register of Historic Places The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government The federal government of the United States (U.S. federal government or U.S. government) is the national government of the United States ...
, and its towers are of the Romanesque Revival style. The market underwent renovations beginning in July 2010. Lancaster also has two outlet shopping centers, both of which are located in
East Lampeter Township East Lampeter Township is a township in central Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, United States. At the 2010 census the population was 16,424. East Lampeter Township is one of the six suburbs that border the city of L ...
on
U.S. Route 30 U.S. Route 30 or U.S. Highway 30 (US 30) is an east–west main route in the system of the United States Numbered Highways The United States Numbered Highway System (often called U.S. Routes or U.S. Highways) is an integrated networ ...
.
Tanger Outlets Tanger Factory Outlet Centers, Inc. ( ) is a real estate investment trust A real estate investment trust (REIT) is a company that owns, and in most cases operates, income-producing real estate Real estate is property consisting of lan ...

Tanger Outlets
is home to about 65 stores. Rockvale Outlets contains over 100 stores and restaurants.


Top employers

According to Lancaster's 2018 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report, the top employers in the city are:


Government

Lancaster operates under a mayor / council form of government. Danene Sorace is the 43rd mayor of Lancaster city. The City Council is composed of seven members: President Ismail Smith Wade-El, Jaime Arroyo, Amanda Bakay, Faith Craig, Janet Diaz, Xavier Garcia-Molina, Pete Soto. On November 7, 2017, Councilwoman Danene Sorace was elected Lancaster's 43rd mayor. The city has a full range of services including public safety, health, housing, parks, streets & highways, Water operations and sewer operations.


Fire Department

The Lancaster City Bureau of Fire operates three engine companies and one truck company. It was established on April 1, 1882, and has a total of 74 uniformed personnel. The Bureau responds to more than 3,000 emergency calls annually.


Police Department

The city of Lancaster is protected by the City of Lancaster Bureau of Police. Founded in 1865, the Bureau of Police is located at 39 W. Chestnut Street in downtown Lancaster, and consists of approximately 147 sworn officers and 46 civilian employees. The Bureau of Police operates out of twelve sectors, or districts, and operates in four divisions, including Patrol, Criminal Investigative, Administrative Services, and Contracted Services. The Bureau also remains the largest law enforcement agency in Lancaster County.


Security camera controversy

Not long after a police officer was wounded in a February 17, 2000 daytime shootout near the center of Lancaster's Penn Square, community residents, law enforcement, and elected officials sought viable solutions to rising crime in downtown. Addressing issues of public safety was a goal when the Lancaster County Crime Commission convened in August 2000. Public meetings and discussions were held over a two-year period. Among the seventeen recommendations in the Crime Commission's 2003 report was to explore the feasibility of a civilian-driven system of security cameras to support law enforcement and first responders. Largely due to concerns over a government- or police-operated system of cameras, the Lancaster Community Safety Coalition (LCSC) organized and was registered with the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania as a nonprofit in 2004. Its goals included operating a video surveillance system, but it also developed to work on safety by design and community mobilization."Lancaster's candid cameras: Who funds them and what the controversial videos show"
Paid LCSC staff are background-checked by the FBI and trained to monitor the network of 164 closed-circuit TV cameras in the city of Lancaster. The community organization is also interested in stimulating economic development in downtown by creating a safe environment. In 2009, the LCSC's expansion from a 70 to a 165-camera network attracted national attention, including a front-page article in the ''Los Angeles Times'': "Lancaster, Pa., keeps a close eye on itself"."Keeping watch on the city's cameras"
, ''Lancaster Online''
The article quoted city police chief Keith Sadler as saying, "Years ago, there's no way we could do this... It brings to mind Big Brother (Nineteen Eighty-Four), Big Brother, George Orwell and ''Nineteen Eighty-four, 1984.'' It's just funny how Americans have softened on these issues." Prior to the ''Los Angeles Times'' article, there had been little public opposition to the CCTV camera system. Data showed it had contributed to the prosecution or prevention of several crimes. However, in response to the national coverage, a small but vocal group of opponents developed, who wanted to turn off the cameras, "possibly for good." The MSNBC commentator Keith Olbermann highlighted the issue in his 'Worst Person in the World' segment, criticizing the citizens for "spying on each other." ABC's ''Nightline (US news program), Nightline'' and ''CBS Evening News'' also covered the citizen-operated surveillance system.


Politics

While Lancaster County as a whole tilts heavily Republican, the city of Lancaster leans much more Democratic. Registered Democrats held a 13,000 voter registration advantage over registered Republicans in the city as of June 2009. President of the United States, U.S. presidential candidate Barack Obama easily won the city of Lancaster, receiving 76% of the vote during the 2008 United States presidential election, 2008 presidential election. Federally, Lancaster is part of Pennsylvania's 11th congressional district, represented by Republican Lloyd Smucker of nearby West Lampeter Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, West Lampeter Township. The state's senior member of the United States Senate is Democrat Bob Casey, Jr., Bob Casey, first elected in 2006. The state's junior member of the United States Senate is Republican Pat Toomey, first elected in 2010. The Governor of Pennsylvania is Democrat Tom Wolf (politician), Tom Wolf of neighboring York County, Pennsylvania, York County, first elected in 2014. Additionally, the city of Lancaster is the headquarters of the Constitution Party (United States), Constitution Party. Lancaster was home to Democrat
James Buchanan James Buchanan Jr. ( ; April 23, 1791June 1, 1868) was an American lawyer and politician who served as the 15th president of the United States The president of the United States (POTUS) is the and of the . The president directs the ...

James Buchanan
, the fifteenth president of the United States. Buchanan arrived in Lancaster in 1809 to practice law. He took up residence near the courthouse on N. Duke Street. In 1848 he purchased Wheatland, a Federal style mansion in the suburbs. He was elected president in 1856.


Neighborhoods

* Cabbage Hill/The Hill (named for the cabbage patches kept by ethnic Germans in this area) * Chestnut Hill * Downtown/Center City * Downtown Investment District * Historic East Side * Eighth Ward * Gallery Row/Arts District * Galebach Ward * Northwest Corridor * Penn Square * Prospect Heights * Seventh Ward * Sixth Ward * Uptown * West End * Woodward Hill


Infrastructure


Transportation

The Red Rose Transit Authority (RRTA) provides local public bus transit to the city of Lancaster and surrounding areas in Lancaster County. RRTA is headquartered outside the city of Lancaster. The Queen Street Station (Lancaster, Pennsylvania), Queen Street Station in downtown Lancaster serves as a transit hub for several RRTA bus routes. Bieber Transportation Group (formerly Capitol Trailways) formerly provided intercity bus transit from the Lancaster (Amtrak station), Lancaster Train and Bus Station to
Reading Reading is the process of taking in the sense or meaning of letters, symbols, ''etc.'', especially by sight or touch. For educators and researchers, reading is a multifaceted process involving such areas as word recognition, orthography An ...
, Norristown, Pennsylvania, Norristown,
Philadelphia Philadelphia (colloquially known simply as Philly) is the largest city in the Commonwealth A commonwealth is a traditional English term for a political community founded for the common good In philosophy Philosophy (from , ) is ...

Philadelphia
, and New York City to the east, and York, Pennsylvania, York to the west; service was discontinued on April 1, 2018. Intercity bus service from York and Lancaster to New York City was restored by OurBus in July 2018. Amtrak also serves the Lancaster (Amtrak station), Lancaster Train and Bus Station, located on the northernmost edge of the city at 53 East McGovern Avenue. The ''Pennsylvanian (train), Pennsylvanian'', with service between Pittsburgh and New York City via
Philadelphia Philadelphia (colloquially known simply as Philly) is the largest city in the Commonwealth A commonwealth is a traditional English term for a political community founded for the common good In philosophy Philosophy (from , ) is ...

Philadelphia
, as well as the ''Keystone Service'', which runs from
Harrisburg Harrisburg ( ; Pennsylvania German language, Pennsylvania German: ''Harrisbarrig'') is the capital city of the Pennsylvania, Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in the United States, and the county seat of Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, Dauphin Count ...
to New York City via Philadelphia, both serve Lancaster. The city is served by the Lancaster Airport (Pennsylvania), Lancaster Airport, located six miles (10 km) north of downtown and just south of Lititz, with commercial air service by Southern Airways Express to
Baltimore Baltimore ( , locally: ) is the most populous city The United Nations uses three definitions for what constitutes a city, as not all cities in all jurisdictions are classified using the same criteria. Cities may be defined as the city prop ...

Baltimore
and Pittsburgh. Lancaster is also a hub for automobile traffic, with many major roadways passing through or around the city, including U.S. Route 30 in Pennsylvania, US 30, U.S. Route 222, US 222, Pennsylvania Route 283, PA 283, Pennsylvania Route 72, PA 72, and Pennsylvania Route 272, PA 272.


Utilities

Electricity in Lancaster is provided by PPL Electric Utilities. UGI Utilities supplies natural gas to the city. The City of Lancaster Water Department provides water service to residents and businesses in the city. The city's Public Works department provides wastewater service to Lancaster, operating the City of Lancaster Advanced Wastewater Treatment Plant which serves the city and surrounding municipalities. Trash and recycling collection is provided by the city's Public Works department.


Historical landmarks

Many of Lancaster's landmarks are significant in local, state, and national history. * Central Market – built in 1889, it is the oldest continuously run farmers' market in the United States. * Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church – built in 1879, the church's congregation aided freedmen migrating to the North for opportunities after the American Civil War. Their congregation had earlier aided fugitive Slavery in the United States, slaves fleeing the Southeastern United States, South before the war, using their former church as a station on the Underground Railroad. * Cork Factory Hotel – built in 1865 as Conestoga Cork Works. Later the buildings making up what is known today as Urban Place were home to Armstrong Cork Factory and Kerr Glass Company. Rezoned in 2005, Urban Place has been adapted as 49 loft-style apartments, 115,000 square feet of retail and commercial space, the Cork Factory Hotel, and Cap & Cork Restaurant. *
Fulton Opera House The Fulton Opera Opera is a form of theatre in which music is a fundamental component and dramatic roles are taken by Singing, singers, but is distinct from musical theatre. Such a "work" (the literal translation of the Italian word "opera") ...

Fulton Opera House
– the oldest continually running theater in the United States, it is one of three theaters designated as National Historic Landmarks (the others are the Walnut Street Theatre in
Philadelphia Philadelphia (colloquially known simply as Philly) is the largest city in the Commonwealth A commonwealth is a traditional English term for a political community founded for the common good In philosophy Philosophy (from , ) is ...

Philadelphia
and the Goldenrod (showboat), Goldenrod Showboat in St. Louis, Missouri). * Hamilton Watch Complex – former factory and headquarters of the Hamilton Watch Company, which in 1957 sold the world's first battery-powered watch, the Hamilton Electric 500. * J. P. McCaskey High School – built in 1938 during the Great Depression, it is designed in the Art Deco architectural style. *St. Mary's Church (Lancaster, Pennsylvania), Historic St. Mary's Church – built in 1854, this church has served the German-speaking Catholics of Lancaster since 1741. * Lancaster Arts Hotel – Built in 1881, this building was the Falk and Rosenbaum Tobacco Warehouse. In October 2006, the warehouse reopened after adaptation, as Lancaster's first boutique hotel for the arts. It has 63 guest rooms (including 12 suites); an organic restaurant, John J Jeffries; and an on-site art gallery. It is registered with the Historic Hotels of America. *
Lancaster County PrisonThe Lancaster County Prison is a county prison A prison (also known as a jail or gaol (dated, British, Australian, and to a lesser extent Canadian Canadians (french: Canadiens) are people identified with the country of Canada. This co ...
– built in 1849, it was styled after the
Lancaster Castle Lancaster Castle is a medieval castle A castle is a type of fortification, fortified structure built during the Middle Ages predominantly by the nobility or royalty and by Military order (monastic society), military orders. Scholars de ...

Lancaster Castle
in England. * Rock Ford Plantation – built in 1794, this was the home of General Edward Hand, adjutant general to George Washington during the American Revolutionary War. *Unitarian Universalist Church of Lancaster, Pennsylvania - built in 1908–1909 in what is now the Historic District of Lancaster, it is unique among the buildings by C. Emlen Urban and contains stained glass by Franz Xaver Zettler (designed by Swiss-American architect Woldemar H. Ritter) and by Charles Connick. * W. W. Griest Building – listed on the U.S.
National Register of Historic Places The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government The federal government of the United States (U.S. federal government or U.S. government) is the national government of the United States ...
since June 25, 1999. It was built in 1925 in the Beaux-Arts architecture, Beaux-Arts style using granite, limestone, terra cotta, synthetics, and asphalt. The building is named after William Walton Griest, a former Pennsylvania United States House of Representatives, representative. It is the second-tallest building in the city. * Wheatland – the historic estate of
James Buchanan James Buchanan Jr. ( ; April 23, 1791June 1, 1868) was an American lawyer and politician who served as the 15th president of the United States The president of the United States (POTUS) is the and of the . The president directs the ...

James Buchanan
, the 15th President of the United States.


Art and museums

The city of Lancaster has art, craft and historical museums. The Demuth Museum is located in the former home of the well-known painter Charles Demuth, who had a national reputation in the 20th century. Additional museums include the Lancaster Museum of Art and the Philips Museum of Art on the campus of
Franklin & Marshall College Franklin & Marshall College (F&M) is a Private college, private Liberal arts colleges in the United States, liberal arts college in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. It employs 175 full-time faculty members and has a student body of approximately 2,400 ...

Franklin & Marshall College
. Art students at the state-of-the-art Pennsylvania College of Art and Design present their works at the academy's gallery, which is open to the public. LancasterARTS, a non-profit organization founded in 2002, promotes contemporary arts and crafts. Lancaster city has a thriving art community. Gallery Row on the 100 block of North Prince St. features a block of art galleries, and the city proper has over 40 galleries and artists' studios. The galleries host a "First Friday" each month, extending their business hours to exhibit new artwork and new artists to the public. The Lancaster County Quilts and Textile Museum, completed in 2007, celebrates the art of the hand-sewn quilts and other textile items produced by women of the region's Amish and Mennonite communities. The museum was closed in 2011. The Lancaster Mennonite Historical Society Museum and the Heritage Center Museum display artifacts and interpret the region's unique history. Children can have a hands-on experience with educational learning at the Hands-on House, also known as the Children's Museum of Lancaster. Nature and geology-minded visitors can view the exhibits of the Louise Arnold Tanger Arboretum and the North Museum of Natural History and Science. Lancaster County Convention Center#Stevens & Smith historic site, Stevens and Smith Historic Site is located within the Vine Street lobby of the Lancaster County Convention Center. The site includes the preserved home of U.S. Senator
Thaddeus Stevens Thaddeus Stevens (April 4, 1792August 11, 1868) was a member of the United States House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives is the lower house of the United States Congress, with the United States Senate, Senate ...

Thaddeus Stevens
and his companion Lydia Hamilton Smith. The underground portion of the site includes a recently discovered Underground Railroad feature: a converted water cistern used in the antebellum years to hide fugitive slaves on their way to freedom. In Lancaster County, the Landis Valley Museum in Manheim Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, Manheim Township has exhibits that interpret the county's history and culture, especially as a center of ethnic German Amish and Mennonite culture.


Music and entertainment

There is a rich history of theater and music in Lancaster. The Lancaster Symphony Orchestra has been performing since 1947. The
Fulton Opera House The Fulton Opera Opera is a form of theatre in which music is a fundamental component and dramatic roles are taken by Singing, singers, but is distinct from musical theatre. Such a "work" (the literal translation of the Italian word "opera") ...

Fulton Opera House
is one of the oldest working theaters in the United States. The Ware Center of Millersville University, The Ware Center (owned by Millersville University of Pennsylvania, Millersville University) and Lancaster Trust Company#The Trust Performing Arts Center, The Trust Performing Arts Center (operated by Lancaster Bible College) both regularly host live theater, concerts, and performances. Tellus360 and the Chameleon Club are rock and event venues in downtown Lancaster.


Bible musical theatre

Glenn and Shirley Eshelman started Sight & Sound Theatres in Ronks, Pennsylvania with the original auditorium in 1976. A larger facility, Sight & Sound Entertainment Centre, opened in March 1991, but was destroyed by fire in January 1997. The Millennium Theatre was opened on September 1, 1998. Bible stories are portrayed in elaborate musical theatre productions with large casts. This theatre features more than 2,000 seats, a 300-foot (91 m) wraparound stage that can hold sets up to 40 feet high, and improved audio and visual effects. Millennium Theatre productions include: * ''Noah - The Musical'': 1998–2001, 2004, 2013 * ''The Miracle of Christmas'': 1998–2013, 2015, 2017, 2019 * ''Daniel'': 2002–2003, 2008 * ''Ruth'': 2005–2006 * ''In the Beginning'': 2007–2009 * ''Behold The Lamb'': 1999–2001, 2004–2006, 2009 * ''Joseph'': 2010–2011, 2015 * ''Jonah'': 2012, 2017 * ''Moses'': 2014–2015 * ''Samson'': 2016 * ''Jesus'': 2018-2019 * ''Queen Esther'': 2020-2021


Local Acts

*Amish Outlaws *August Burns Red *Denison Witmer *The Innocence Mission


Sports


Baseball

The Barnstormers played their inaugural season in 2005, filling Lancaster's 44-year period without professional baseball since the demise of the Lancaster Red Roses, Red Roses. Their main Atlantic League rival is the York Revolution, Revolution from nearby York, Pennsylvania, York. Lancaster is the hometown of Major League Baseball alumnus Tom Herr. He played for the St. Louis Cardinals for a majority of his career. He also played for the Minnesota Twins, Philadelphia Phillies, New York Mets, and the San Francisco Giants . Herr subsequently coached the Hempfield High School Black Knights baseball team for several years. He also managed the Lancaster Barnstormers in their first season. In 2006, Herr led the club to their first-ever Atlantic League championship over the Bridgeport Bluefish.


Cycling

The Lancaster Bicycle Club hosts an annual Covered Bridge Metric Century bicycle race. In 2010, more than 2,500 riders participated. The city of Lancaster hosted the Tom Bamford Lancaster Classic, an international, professional bicycle racing event held each June since 1992. It was part of the 2006–2007 UCI America Tour and the 2007 USA Cycling Professional Tour.


Golf

Professional golf is well represented by the Professional Golf Association's Jim Furyk. He placed 4th in the 1998 and 2003 Masters tournament, won the 2003 U.S. Open, placed 4th in the 1997, 1998, and 2006 British Open, and placed 6th in the 1997 PGA championship. Furyk also won the Vardon Trophy in 2006. He is an alumnus of Manheim Township High School, located in the immediate suburb of Manheim Township. The 2015 United States Women's Open Championship (golf), U.S. Women's Open was held at the Lancaster Country Club.


Soccer

Lancaster has both a men's and a women's semi-professional soccer club. Pennsylvania Classics AC play in the National Premier Soccer League, a fourth-tier in the American soccer pyramid. Lancaster Inferno FC play in United Women's Soccer, a second-tier league. Both clubs play their home games at Crusader Stadium on the campus of Lancaster Catholic High School. The city also has an amateur team called Lancaster City FC that plays other regional clubs in the United Soccer League of Pennsylvania.


Field hockey

In 2013, USA Field Hockey announced their intentions to move their national training center for the United States women's national field hockey team to Lancaster County. They signed with Spooky Nook Sports through 2022 after searching for many years for a Northeastern United States, northeastern site.


Amateur sports in Lancaster

Lancaster's suburban area hosts several amateur sports teams. Ice hockey is represented by the Central Penn Panthers, a member of the junior-level Atlantic Metropolitan Hockey League, and both the Lancaster Firebirds, and Regency Panthers youth amateur ice hockey organization of the USA Hockey's Atlantic District. American football is represented by the Lancaster Lightning, a member of the semi-professional North American Football League, that plays in nearby Kinzers. A close cousin of American football, rugby, is represented by the Roses Rugby Football Club of the Mid Atlantic Rugby Football Union, of which the Roses RFC were the 2005 champions. Roller derby is represented by the Dutchland Derby Rollers, an all-female roller derby team which plays to raise money for various charities, and is currently ranked #23 in the world by Derby News Network.


Historical Lancaster teams

The Lancaster Red Roses of the Eastern Professional Baseball League are the most well-known of Lancaster's defunct teams. They played from 1906 to 1909, and from 1940 to their last season in 1961. The Red Roses were called the "Lancaster Maroons" from 1896 to 1899 and the "Lancaster Red Sox" in 1932. The "Lancaster Red Roses (basketball), Lancaster Red Roses" was also the name of a basketball franchise in the Continental Basketball Association (at that time, the Eastern Professional Basketball League) from 1946 to 1949, and from 1953 to 1955. The CBA later hosted another Lancaster team called the Lightning from 1981 to 1985. The Lightning later moved to Rockford, Illinois, where they played until the 2007 season. The Storm of the Eastern Basketball Alliance played from 1997 to 2000, winning the league championship in 1999. The last professional basketball team to call Lancaster home was the Liberty, who played as a member of the now-defunct Global Professional Basketball League in 2009.


Inventions and firsts

* The
Conestoga wagon The Conestoga wagon is a specific design of heavy covered wagon The covered wagon, also called the prairie schooner, was a vehicle usually made out of wood Wood is a porous and fibrous structural tissue found in the Plant stem, stems a ...

Conestoga wagon
was first built in Lancaster, used extensively for migrations before the development of the railroad. * The first long rifle, Pennsylvania Rifle was created by Martin Meylin in the 1700s. * Peeps, an Easter confection shaped as marshmallow chicks covered with yellow sugar, were invented by the Rodda Candy Company of Lancaster in the 1920s. In 1953, Rodda was purchased by Sam Born, the Russian immigrant who invented ice cream "jimmies", and production was moved to Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. * The first battery-powered watch, the Hamilton Electric 500, was released in 1957 by the Hamilton Watch Company.


Education

Education in Lancaster is provided by many private and public institutions. The School District of Lancaster runs the city's Public school (government funded), public schools. Established in 1836, it is the second oldest school district in Pennsylvania. The local high school campuses are McCaskey and McCaskey East. Lancaster Catholic High School has a long history in the county; it was founded in 1926. It currently falls under the jurisdiction of the diocese of Harrisburg. With a P-12 enrollment of more than 500 students, Lancaster Country Day School is one of the region's largest independent nonsectarian schools. Founded in 1908 as the Shippen School for Girls, the school became coeducational and relocated from downtown Lancaster to its Hamilton Road address in 1949. La Academia Partnership Charter School, opened in 1998, serves grades 6–12. It is the only public charter school in Lancaster County, and is open to any student residing in the county. Manheim Township School District is a four-year public high school located in Lancaster. It is the only high school in the Manheim Township School District. It is supported by a 7th and 8th grade middle school, a 5th and 6th grade intermediate school, and five elementary schools. In 2008, Manheim Township High School was named one of the top 505 high schools in the nation by ''U.S. News & World Report''. It is also known for graduating professional golfer Jim Furyk. On May 13, 2015, Lancaster City was named by GoodCall as the number one best city in the country to be a teacher. The top 10 list was based on average annual teacher salary, available teaching jobs, teaching jobs per capita, high school graduation rates, cost of living and amenities. Data was gathered from the U.S. Census, Indeed.com, the National Center for Education Statistics, and WalkScore.com. The Lancaster area hosts several colleges and universities, including Consolidated School of Business,
Franklin & Marshall College Franklin & Marshall College (F&M) is a Private college, private Liberal arts colleges in the United States, liberal arts college in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. It employs 175 full-time faculty members and has a student body of approximately 2,400 ...

Franklin & Marshall College
, Lancaster General College of Nursing & Health Sciences, Lancaster Theological Seminary, Lancaster Bible College, Pennsylvania College of Art and Design, Thaddeus Stevens College of Technology, Millersville University of Pennsylvania, Central Pennsylvania College, Elizabethtown College and the Harrisburg Area Community College.


Media


Print

* ''LNP (newspaper), LNP'', the county's predominant newspaper * ''Lancaster Newspapers#La Voz Hispana, La Voz Hispana'', the city's Spanish-language edition * ''Lancaster Newspapers#Sunday News, Sunday News'', the county's weekly edition * ''Fly Magazine'', Lancaster City's Downtown Guide * ''Fine Living Lancaster'', a regional lifestyle magazine


TV

Lancaster is part of the
Harrisburg Harrisburg ( ; Pennsylvania German language, Pennsylvania German: ''Harrisbarrig'') is the capital city of the Pennsylvania, Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in the United States, and the county seat of Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, Dauphin Count ...
-Lancaster-York, Pennsylvania, York market. In addition to WGAL and TeleCentro TV, the city is served by CBS/MyNetworkTV/The CW, CW affiliate WHP-TV 21, American Broadcasting Company, ABC affiliate WHTM-TV 27, PBS member station WITF-TV 33, and Fox Broadcasting Company, Fox affiliate WPMT 43. WPMT is based in York, while the other major stations are based in Harrisburg.


Radio stations


Nearby cities

*
York, Pennsylvania York (Pennsylvania German language, Pennsylvania German: ''Yarrick''), known as the White Rose City (after the White Rose of York, symbol of the House of York), is the county seat of York County, Pennsylvania, United States, located in the South ...

York, Pennsylvania
* Harrisburg, Pennsylvania * Reading, Pennsylvania * Lebanon, Pennsylvania


Notable people

*
James Buchanan James Buchanan Jr. ( ; April 23, 1791June 1, 1868) was an American lawyer and politician who served as the 15th president of the United States The president of the United States (POTUS) is the and of the . The president directs the ...

James Buchanan
, the nation's 15th president, trained as a lawyer in Lancaster. *Maria Louise Kirk (1860–1938), painter and illustrator, was born here. * Thomas Mifflin (1744–1800), merchant, soldier, and politician *
Thaddeus Stevens Thaddeus Stevens (April 4, 1792August 11, 1868) was a member of the United States House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives is the lower house of the United States Congress, with the United States Senate, Senate ...

Thaddeus Stevens
, congressman and abolitionist *Charlotte White (1782–1863), the first unmarried American female overseas missionary, was born in Lancaster. *Anna Diller Starbuck (1868-1929) composer and pianist *Adam Cole, Professional wrestler currently signed to All Elite Wrestling, AEW *Taylor Kinney, Actor


See also

* List of people from Lancaster County, Pennsylvania


References


Further reading

* ** Interview with the author: * Lottie M. Bausman
''A Bibliography of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, 1745–1912''
Philadelphia: Pennsylvania Federation of Historical Societies, 1917. * Frank Ried Diffenderffer
''The Early Settlement and Population of Lancaster County and City''
Lancaster, PA: The New Era, 1905. * H. M. J. Klein
''Lancaster's Golden Century, 1821–1921: A Chronicle of Men and Women Who Planned and Toiled to Build a City Strong and Beautiful''
Lancaster, PA: Hager and Brother, 1921. * ''The Lancaster Farmer: A Monthly Newspaper''. Vol. 1 (1869)

Vol. 2 (1870)

Vol. 3 (1871)

Vol. 4 (1872)

Vol. 5 (1873)

Vol. 6 (1874)

Vol. 7 (1875)

Vol. 8 (1876)

Vol. 9 (1877)

Vol. 10 (1878)

Vol. 11 (1879)

Vol. 12 (1880)

Vol. 13 (1881)

Vol. 14 (1882)

Vol. 15 (1883)

Vol. 16 (1885)
* Dave Pidgeon
"Battle Over City Project Moves to Courtroom"
''Intelligencer Journal'' (Lancaster, PA), July 13, 2006. * William Riddle
''One Hundred And Fifty Years of School History in Lancaster, Pennsylvania''
Lancaster, PA: William Riddle, 1905. * Israel Daniel Rupp
''History of Lancaster and York Counties''
n.c.: n.p., 1845.


External links

*
Official Lancaster city events websiteOfficial Tourism Bureau: Discover Lancaster websitePA Dutch Country Welcome Center website
* {{authority control Lancaster, Pennsylvania, 1734 establishments in the Thirteen Colonies Cities in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania Cities in Pennsylvania County seats in Pennsylvania Former capitals of the United States Former state capitals in the United States, Pennsylvania Populated places established in 1734 Populated places on the Underground Railroad