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The National Science and Media Museum
National Science and Media Museum
(formerly the National Media Museum), located in Bradford, West Yorkshire, is part of the national Science Museum Group. The museum has seven floors of galleries with permanent exhibitions focusing on photography, television, animation, videogaming, the Internet
Internet
and the scientific principles behind light and colour. It also hosts temporary exhibitions and maintains a collection of 3.5 million pieces in its research facility. The venue has three cinemas, operated in partnership with Picturehouse Cinemas, including an IMAX
IMAX
screen. It hosts festivals dedicated to widescreen film, video games and science, and has previously hosted popular film festivals, including the Bradford
Bradford
International Film Festival until 2014. In September 2011 the museum was voted the best indoor attraction in Yorkshire by the public, and it is one of the most visited museums in the north of England.[2][3] As of February 2016[update] the museum, in response to revenue shortfalls, has controversially adopted a policy of focusing on "the science and culture of light and sound"—to the exclusion of what are seen as "unsustainable" aspects of creativity and culture, such as past film festivals.[4] In March 2016 a £7.5 million five year investment plan in the museum was revealed by the Science Museum Group.[5] In March 2017 its name was changed from National Media Museum
National Media Museum
to National Science and Media Museum.[6]

Contents

1 Building and admission

1.1 Galleries 1.2 Cinemas 1.3 Insight

2 Collection 3 History 4 Past exhibitions 5 Current festival programme

5.1 Widescreen Weekend 5.2 Yorkshire Games Festival 5.3 Bradford
Bradford
Science Festival

6 Discontinued film festivals

6.1 Bradford
Bradford
International Film Festival 6.2 Bradford
Bradford
Animation
Animation
Festival 6.3 Fantastic Films Weekend

7 References 8 External links

Building and admission[edit] Entrance is free, with the exception of cinema screens. The museum is open 10 am until 6 pm every day. The museum underwent a £16 million refurbishment in 1998, developing a new digital technology gallery. This new development created a new glass-fronted atrium, which houses a new cafe and shop. Galleries[edit] There are seven permanent exhibitions:

Tableau in the Kodak
Kodak
Gallery

Kodak
Kodak
Gallery – The Kodak
Kodak
Gallery takes the viewer on a journey through the history of popular photography, from the world's first photographs to the digital snapshots of today. Most of the items on display in the gallery are taken from the museum collection of 35,000 objects and images donated by Kodak. Wonderlab – Explores light and sound through interactive exhibits and live experiments. Opened in 2016, replacing the Experience TV gallery. Life Online – The world's first gallery dedicated to exploring the social, technological and cultural impact of the Internet. BFI Mediatheque – Allows visitors to access the British Film Institute collection of film and television programmes in the BFI National Archive. It replaced TV Heaven, a unique viewing facility where visitors could access an archive of more than 1000 programmes covering sixty years of British television history. TV Heaven closed in 2013 after 20 years, but 50 titles are still available.[7] TV Gallery – Explores the development, significance and cultural impact of television. Animation
Animation
Gallery – Explores the history of animation and animated images, with an emphasis on animation produced in Britain. Includes how animators bring drawings and objects to life.

Games Lounge

Games Lounge – Playable classic games in their original arcade or console formats; the history of video gaming; the story behind this global phenomenon.

Cinemas[edit]

Entrance to the IMAX
IMAX
cinema

The museum incorporates the first permanent UK installation of an IMAX cinema[8] (with a second screen opening in the UK 15 years later). Opened in 1983 as part of the Bradford
Bradford
Film Festival with the projector visible from a darkened booth of the 4th floor. Films included IMAX
IMAX
prints of Apollo 13, The Lion King, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire and Batman Begins. In 1999, IMAX
IMAX
upgraded the system and began releasing IMAX
IMAX
3D presentations.[9] In 2015 it was changed to digital projection instead of film.[10] As a result, the IMAX projection booth is no longer visible.

Pictureville Cinema
Pictureville Cinema
showing curved wide screen

The museum also incorporates the Pictureville Cinema
Pictureville Cinema
– opened in 1992 and described by David Puttnam
David Puttnam
as 'the best cinema in the world ',[11] Pictureville Cinema
Pictureville Cinema
screens everything from 70 mm to video; from Hollywood to Bollywood; from silents to digital sound, with certifications in presentation including THX
THX
in sound and picture and the Dolby EX
Dolby EX
system. In 2008, the cinema presented the only true recorded public screening of Danny Boyle's 2002 film Alien Love Triangle. Pictureville Cinema
Pictureville Cinema
is one of only three public cinemas in the world permanently equipped to display original 3-strip 35mm Cinerama
Cinerama
prints, and is the only public Cinerama
Cinerama
venue in the UK. Cinerama
Cinerama
films are screened at the annual Widescreen Weekend film festival.[12] The Cubby Broccoli
Cubby Broccoli
Cinema (in memory of Cubby Broccoli, producer of James Bond
James Bond
films), contains 106 seats and is used for a variety of film shows. In 2012, it was one of three venues in the UK to screen the Olympic Opening Ceremony in Super Hi-Vision.[13]

Insight[edit] Insight is a facility where members of the public can (by prior booking) view parts of the collections which are not on general display. Collection[edit]

Playschool puppets

The museum's collection contains 3.5 million items of historical, cultural and social value. Notable objects and archives include:

The first photographic negative The earliest television footage The world's first colour moving pictures[14] Louis Le Prince's 1888 films Roundhay Garden Scene and Traffic Crossing Leeds
Leeds
Bridge A collection of 35,000 objects and images donated by Kodak
Kodak
Ltd. A collection of around 1,000 historical objects from the BBC[15] The photographic archive of the Daily Herald, comprising millions of images[16] The photographic archive of Tony Ray-Jones[17] Original toys from the BBC
BBC
series Play School – the first programme on BBC2 Objects and designs used in the making of Hammer horror
Hammer horror
films[18]

The collections are accessible to the public through the museum's Insight study centre. The collection of the Royal Photographic Society
Royal Photographic Society
was transferred to the Museum on behalf of the nation in 2003.[19] As of 2017, most of the collection is moving to the Victoria and Albert museum
Victoria and Albert museum
in London.[20] The National Science and Media Museum
National Science and Media Museum
"will retain collections that help explore the development of photographic processes, such as the Kodak
Kodak
collection; the cultural impact of photography, such as the Daily Herald archive; and archives that have a direct relevance to Bradford."[20] History[edit] The museum occupies a site originally proposed for a theatre in central Bradford, for which work begun in the 1960s remained unfinished.[21] Resulting from discussions between Dame Margaret Weston of the Science Museum, London
Science Museum, London
and Bradford
Bradford
city councillors,[21] the National Museum of Photography, Film and Television, as it was then called, opened on 16 June 1983. The museum launched Britain’s largest cinema screen, IMAX, five storeys high with six-channel sound, on the same day. During this period the museum specialised in the art and science of images and image-making since Colin Ford, its first director, believed that understanding how images are made led to appreciation of the ideas expressed and the intentions and skills of image-makers. To mark the 50th anniversary of the first public television service, two interactive television galleries were developed in 1986. These allowed visitors to operate cameras on a studio set with programmed sound and lighting, use vision mixers, read a news item from an autocue and discover how chroma keying works. In 1989, to celebrate the 150th anniversary of photography, the museum launched the Kodak
Kodak
Gallery, a display of the history of photography from its invention. This was followed by the installation of a standard television studio, first used by TV-am
TV-am
for outside broadcasts and, later, Nickelodeon. These studios were the first live broadcasting studios in a museum. While continuing to run the Pictureville Cinema
Pictureville Cinema
and exhibitions in a temporary venue on the other side of the city, the museum closed its main site on 31 August 1997 to allow for a 19-month, £16 million redevelopment, making the museum 25% bigger. The IMAX
IMAX
cinema was also developed to show 3D films. The new museum was opened on 16 June 1999 by Pierce Brosnan. On 1 December 2006, the museum was renamed the National Media Museum and two new £3 million interactive galleries were opened: Experience TV (now replaced by Wonderlab) and TV Heaven (now the BFI Mediatheque), dedicated to the past, present and future of television. The galleries displayed scientific exhibits, such as John Logie Baird's original apparatus, and television ephemera such as Wallace and Gromit and Play School toys. TV Heaven made accessible the museum's collection of television programmes, most of which are not available elsewhere. In 2009 the museum partnered with other bodies from the Bradford district in a successful bid to become the world's first UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation) City of Film.[22] A major revamp of the foyer was unveiled in February 2010, including a brand new Games Lounge, a new gallery drawing on the National Videogame Archive established in 2008 in partnership with Nottingham Trent University. It was originally intended to be temporary but one in five visitors to the Games Lounge named it as their favourite part of the museum, resulting in creation of a permanent Lounge in another part of the museum.[23] In March 2012 the museum opened Life Online, the world's first gallery dedicated to exploring the social, technological and cultural impact of the Internet. The permanent gallery was initially accompanied by a temporary exhibition, [open source]: Is the internet you know under threat? – an exploration of the open source nature of the Internet and the current threats to net neutrality and the continuation of the open source culture. In October 2014 the museum entered into a partnership with Picturehouse Cinemas
Picturehouse Cinemas
with the national chain taking over the running of the three cinema screens in a bid to boost audience figures and revenue. The partnership is designated "Picturehouse at the National Media Museum".[24] Despite sustained growth in ticket sales,[25] the museum cancelled its participation in the 2015 Bradford
Bradford
International Film Festival[26] and followed up by totally withdrawing from the festival the following year.[27] This move, together with the transfer of a major photographic collection to London's Victoria and Albert Museum, is very controversial.[28][29] In August 2016, the museum confirmed plans to permanently close their Experience TV gallery on 30 August 2016.[30] The TV collection objects previously on display in Experience TV are now available to view by booking through the Insight centre at the museum. In March 2017, the museum opened its £1.8 million interactive gallery Wonderlab – which replaces Experience TV – and announced its change of name to the National Science and Media Museum. Wonderlab is based on the principles of light and sound; attractions include a mirror maze, a 15-metre echo tube and a musical laser tunnel, as well as the world’s first permanent 3D-printed zoetrope.[31] In August 2017, it was announced that Soyuz TMA-19M
Soyuz TMA-19M
– the space capsule that brought British astronaut Tim Peake
Tim Peake
back to Earth after his months-long stint on the International Space Station – would be displayed at the museum in September 2017. This was the first time the capsule had been displayed outside London.[32] Past exhibitions[edit]

Ooh La La! Martin Parr, 1998 Donovan Wylie: Losing Ground, 1998 Young Meteors: British Photojournalism 1957–1965, 1998 ReVisions: An Alternative History of Photography, 1999 New Natural History, 1999 Birth of the Cool: David Bailey, 1999–2000 FutureWorld, 2000 A Collector's Choice, 2000 Specimens and Marvels: The Work of William Henry Fox Talbot, 2000 NOISEGATE by Granular Synthesis, 2000 The Art of Star Wars, 2000–2001 In a Lonely Place, 2001 Symptomatic: Recent Works by Perry Hoberman, 2001 Paul Strand: Tir a'Mhurain, 2001–2002 Bond, James Bond, 2002 Martin Parr: Photographic Works 1971–2000, 2002–2003 Unknown Pleasures: Unwrapping the Royal Photographic Society Collection, 2003 Fabula, 2003 Julia Margaret Cameron: 19th Century Photographer of Genius, 2003 GENUS, 2003–2004 A Matter of Focus: The Art of Photography
Photography
1892–1917, 2003–2004 Luc Delahaye: History and Winterreise, 2004 Simone Nieweg: Landscapes and Gardens, 2004 Everything's Gone Green: Photography
Photography
and the Garden, 2004 Faking It: Between Art Photography
Photography
and Advertising, 2004 A Gentle Madness: The Photographs of Tony Ray-Jones
Tony Ray-Jones
(1941–1972), 2004–2005 The Other Side of Football: Hans van der Meer, 2005 Forget Me Not: Photography
Photography
and Remembrance, 2005 Fashination, 2005 Lifetimes: Portrait Projects by Julian Germain, 2005–2006 Raghubir Singh: From One World to Another, 2005–2006 Mark Power: A System of Edges, 2006 Elliot Erwitt: A Retrospective, 2006 A Tale of Two Cities, 2006 Myths and Visions: The Art of Ray Harryhausen, 2006 The British Landscape: Photographs by John Davies, 2006–2007 The Old Order and the New: P.H. Emerson and Photography
Photography
(1885–1895), 2006–2007 Paul Seawright: Field Notes, 2007 An-My Lê: Small Wars, 2007 The Dawn of Colour: Celebrating the Centenary of the Autochrome, 2007 Celebrating Indian Cinema, 2007 Extra! Extra! Tales from the Daily Herald Picture Library, 2007 Sarah Jones, 2007–2008 Henri Cartier-Bresson's Scrapbook: Photographs 1932–1946, 2007 Sunny Snaps, 2007 Live By the Lens, Die By the Lens, 2008 New Works: Pavilion Commissions 2008, 2008–2009 Breaking News: Celebrating 140 Years of the Press Association, 2008–2009 "Here's one we made earlier..." 50 Years of Blue Peter, 2008–2009 Baby: Picturing the Ideal Human, 2009 Don McCullin: In England, 2009 Animalism, 2009 Drawings That Move: The Art of Joanna Quinn, 2009–2010 Neeta Madahar, 2009–2010 Robbie Cooper: Immersion, 2010 Simon Roberts: We English, 2010 Fay Godwin: Land Revisited, 2010–2011 From Back Home, 2010–2011 The Lives of Great Photographers, 2011 David Spero: Churches, 2011 Daniel Meadows: Early Photographic Works, 2011–2012 Outposts: Donovan Wylie, 2011–2012 In the Blink of an Eye, 2012 Art of Arrangement: Photography
Photography
and the Still Life Tradition, 2012–2013 [open source]: Is the internet you know under threat?, 2012–2013 Moving Stories: Children's Books from Page to Screen, 2013 Bollywood
Bollywood
Icons −100 Years of Indian Cinema, 2013 Tom Wood: Photographs 1973–2013, 2013 Copper Horses by Chris Harrison, 2013–2014 Doctor Who
Doctor Who
and Me, 2013–2014 Nature, Camera, Action!, 2014 Open for Business, 2014 Only in England: Photographs by Tony Ray-Jones
Tony Ray-Jones
and Martin Parr, 2014 Joan Fontcuberta: Stranger than Fiction, 2014–2015 Light
Light
Fantastic: Adventures in the Science of Light, 2015 Drawn by Light: The Royal Photographic Society
Royal Photographic Society
Collection, 2015 Revelations: Experiments in Photography, 2015–2016 Star Wars: The Fans Awaken, 2015–2016 Great Interactions: Photographs by Polly Braden, 2016 Gathered Leaves: Photographs by Alec Soth, 2016 In Your Face, 2016 El Salvador: Between Revolution and War, 2016 Fox Talbot: Dawn of the Photograph, 2016–2017 Britain in Focus: A Photographic History, 2017 Poetics of Light: Pinhole Photography, 2017 Supersenses, 2017 Soyuz TMA-19M: Tim Peake’s Spacecraft, 2017 Fake News, 2017–2018

Current festival programme[edit] Widescreen Weekend[edit] This event began as part of Bradford
Bradford
International Film Festival and has been expanded into a 4-day standalone film festival. It takes place every October and focuses on large-screen formats and cinema technologies. It includes 70mm and Cinerama
Cinerama
screenings.[33] Yorkshire Games Festival[edit] This video game festival began in 2016. It celebrates games culture, design and production, and includes a conference programme as well as a weekend of events for families. It takes place every November. Guests at the first Yorkshire Games Festival included John Romero, Rhianna Pratchett, Charles Cecil, Warren Spector
Warren Spector
(via live video link), Brenda Romero, and presenters of The Yogscast.[34] Bradford
Bradford
Science Festival[edit] This family science festival was first held in 2012, but was cancelled in 2016 after the previous organisers no longer had the capacity to carry it on. The museum took over the festival in 2017, in partnership with organisations including the University of Bradford, Bradford Council and Bradford
Bradford
College.[35] Discontinued film festivals[edit] The museum organised and held four major film events every year: Bradford
Bradford
International Film Festival, Bradford
Bradford
Animation
Animation
Festival, Bite the Mango and Fantastic Films Weekend. These attracted international speakers and new and classic works from around the world. All four festivals were eventually cancelled by the museum. Bradford
Bradford
International Film Festival[edit] From its inception in 1995, Bradford
Bradford
International Film Festival (BIFF) presented new and classic films from around the world. The Festival presented films in their original formats wherever possible, and existed to develop understanding of the art and science of the moving image by hosting innovators in many fields of filmmaking. BIFF included the Shine Awards – which highlighting the work of new European directors, a Filmmakers Weekend designed to offer guidance and support to filmmakers in the north of England, and the Widescreen Weekend, which discussed film formats including Cinerama, VistaVision, 70 mm and IMAX. Guests at Bradford
Bradford
International Film Festival included Riz Ahmed, Jenny Agutter, Michael Apted, David Arnold, Thomas Arslan, Ken Annakin, Olivier Assayas, Richard Attenborough, Simon Beaufoy, Alan Bennett, James Benning, Claire Bloom, Kenneth Branagh, Adam Buxton, Jack Cardiff, Ian Carmichael, Gurinder Chadha, Tom Courtenay, Mark Cousins, Alex Cox, Brian Cox, Benedict Cumberbatch, Terence Davies, Michael Deeley, Denis Dercourt, The Dodge Brothers, James Ellis, Mike Figgis, Freddie Francis, Terry Gilliam, Stephen Graham, Richard Griffiths, Ronald Harwood, Mike Hodges, Joanna Hogg, John Hurt, Derek Jacobi, Gualtiero Jacopetti, Terry Jones, Patrick Keiller, Mark Kermode, Mike Leigh, Euan Lloyd, Ken Loach, Malcolm McDowell, Virginia McKenna, Fernando Meirelles, Kay Mellor, Metamono, Chris Morris, Barry Norman, Michael Palin, Pawel Pawlikowski, Christian Petzold, Sally Potter, Godfrey Reggio, Menelik Shabazz, John Shuttleworth, Jean Simmons, Timothy Spall, Imelda Staunton, Eric Sykes, Julien Temple, Alex Thomson, Richard Todd, Danny Trejo, Roy Ward Baker, Peter Whitehead, Michael G. Wilson, Barbara Windsor, Ray Winstone, Stephen Woolley, Thierry Zéno and many independent filmmakers from around the world. Other special programmes included Bradford
Bradford
After Dark (new horror films), Alexey Balabanov, Stan Brakhage, Richard Burton, new Canadian cinema, Pierre Clementi, Alexander Dovzhenko, Hauntology, a centenary of Indian cinema, Chuck Jones, James Mason, Yoshitaro Nomura, Nicolas Roeg, sixpackfilm, American Teen Movies, Uncharted States of America (undiscovered American Cinema), Amos Vogel, and the science films of Charles Urban.[36] Bradford
Bradford
Animation
Animation
Festival[edit] The animation and video games festival was the UK's leading event of its kind; host to discussions, workshops and special events. The annual BAF Awards honoured new animation from around the world. Past guests include representatives from studios such as Pixar, Aardman, Weta Workshops
Weta Workshops
and Sony Interactive
Sony Interactive
plus animators Ray Harryhausen, Richard Williams, Bob Godfrey, Caroline Leaf, Michael Dudok de Wit and Bill Plympton. After the museum ended the festival following its 20th edition in 2014, former museum staff successfully revived the event in Manchester in November 2015 as Manchester Animation
Animation
Festival. Fantastic Films Weekend[edit] This festival began in 2002 as a weekend event focusing on classic ghost stories and the supernatural. It developed into an annual celebration of horror, fantasy and sci-fi cinema and television. In February 2013 it was announced that the Fantastic Films Weekend would not continue.[37] References[edit]

^ "Visits made in 2017 to visitor attractions in membership with ALVA". Association of Leading Visitor Attractions. Retrieved 16 March 2018.  ^ " Bradford
Bradford
museum is voted third best attraction". Bradford
Bradford
Telegraph and Argus. 21 September 2011. Retrieved 25 June 2014.  ^ " National Media Museum
National Media Museum
visitor numbers continue to fall". 4 July 2012. Retrieved 30 August 2012.  ^ Quinton-Tulloch, Jo My Message to Bradford
Bradford
Archived 28 February 2016 at the Wayback Machine. Museum Director, at blog.nationalmediamuseum.org.uk, 4 February 2016 ^ "Museum to benefit from £7.5 million investment plans over 5 years - National Science and Media Museum". www.nationalmediamuseum.org.uk.  ^ "Bradford's National Media Museum
National Media Museum
changes its name". BBC
BBC
News, 9 March 2017. Accessed 29 March 2017 ^ bfi-mediatheques Archived 16 November 2016 at the Wayback Machine. National Media Museum
National Media Museum
Bradford ^ Museum Future and History Archived 19 September 2009 at the Wayback Machine. (ASP). National Media Museum. Bradford, England. Retrieved on 17 December 2009. "First IMAX
IMAX
Cinema in Britain: 1983 the Museum launched one of its biggest attractions: Britain’s largest cinema screen, IMAX." "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 19 September 2009. Retrieved 17 December 2009.  ^ "Movie heaven right here in Bradford". Telegraph & Argus. 26 June 2009. Retrieved 24 October 2011.  ^ Winrow, Jo (18 August 2015). "Eye-opening spectacle as new IMAX screen is delivered through roof of National Media Museum". Retrieved 18 September 2017.  ^ "Picturehouse at NSMM - Cinema - Bradford-West Yorkshire". www.visitbradford.com.  ^ " Cinerama
Cinerama
in the UK: The history of 3-strip cinema in Pictureville Cinema". National Science and Media Museum
National Science and Media Museum
blog. 11 July 2013. Retrieved 19 September 2017.  ^ Zubrzycki, John (1 August 2012). "The Olympics in Super Hi-Vision". BBC
BBC
Research & Development blog. Retrieved 19 September 2017.  ^ "World's first colour moving pictures discovered". BBC
BBC
News. 12 September 2012. Retrieved 19 September 2017.  ^ " BBC
BBC
donates historical collection to National Media Museum
National Media Museum
to mark 90th anniversary". BBC
BBC
Media Centre. 12 November 2012. Retrieved 19 September 2017.  ^ "The Daily Herald Archive: A historic photography collection from the world of print journalism". National Science and Media Museum blog. 27 May 2013. Retrieved 19 September 2017.  ^ "An important photographic archive and an innovative collaboration". National Science and Media Museum
National Science and Media Museum
blog. 19 May 2013. Retrieved 19 September 2017.  ^ "Hammer Horror Collection at the National Media Museum". National Science and Media Museum on YouTube. 30 May 2012. Retrieved 1 February 2018.  ^ "Record grant creates world-class photography archive". The Independent. London. 10 June 2002. Retrieved 24 October 2011.  ^ a b Brown, Mark (1 February 2016). "V&A to hold world's largest collection on art of photography". the Guardian. Retrieved 26 May 2016.  ^ a b Bell, John (1983). The Flash, Bang, Wallop Show. New Scientist. p. 961.  ^ " Bradford
Bradford
wins Unesco City of Film award". The Guardian. 12 June 2009. Retrieved 18 February 2016.  ^ Maldonado, Adrián Medium Archaeology Part 1: Beyond TV Typology at the National Media Museum
National Media Museum
at almostarchaeology.com, 13 January 2016. Retrieved 18 February 2016 ^ "Cinema chain takes over operation of National Media Museum's three screens". 29 September 2014. Retrieved 2 January 2015.  ^ "Concern over future of Bradford
Bradford
International Film Festival". 24 July 2014. Retrieved 8 March 2016.  ^ Bradford
Bradford
International Film Festival cancelled for 2015. BBC
BBC
News, Leeds
Leeds
& West Yorkshire, 23 July 2014. Retrieved 18 February 2016 ^ National Media Museum
National Media Museum
axes Bradford
Bradford
International Film Festival. BBC News, Leeds
Leeds
& West Yorkshire, 4 February 2016. Retrieved 18 February 2016 ^ Furness, Hannah V&A accused of 'cultural rape' after Bradford museum loses photo collection. The Telegraph, 2 February 2016. Retrieved 18 February 2016 ^ Wilde, Claire, CUT! Anger and concern as Media Museum abandons Bradford
Bradford
International Film Festival. Telegraph & Argus, 4 February 2016. Retrieved 18 February 2016 ^ The Telegraph and Argus 13 August 2016 Last chance to experience TV relics from the past, ahead of £1.8m new gallery at National Media Museum ^ Wilde, Claire, New attraction at National Science and Media Museum is a '£2m vote of confidence for Bradford' says Lord Grade. Telegraph & Argus, 23 March 2017. Retrieved 18 September 2017 ^ Tim Peake's Space capsule to touch down at National Science and Media Museum. Telegraph & Argus, 18 August 2017. Retrieved 18 September 2017 ^ "Widescreen Weekend". National Science and Media Museum. Retrieved 18 September 2017.  ^ "Yorkshire Games Festival". National Science and Media Museum. Retrieved 18 September 2017.  ^ " Bradford
Bradford
to host big science festival with fun events planned for city centre". Telegraph & Argus. Retrieved 18 September 2017.  ^ http://www.nationalmediamuseum.org.uk/bradfordinternationalfilmfestival/aboutpages/archive ^ "Farewell Fantastic Films Weekend". National Media Museum
National Media Museum
Blog. Retrieved 9 February 2013. 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to National Science and Media Museum.

Official website Science Museum Group Science and Society Picture Library containing photographic images from the museum and other sources

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Bus Company

Road

M62 M606 A647 A650 A658 A6036 A6177

Miscellaneous

BD postcode area Crime History

Timeline

People

v t e

West Yorkshire
West Yorkshire
museums

City of Bradford
Bradford
museums

Baildon: Bracken Hall Countryside Centre and Museum

Bradford: Bolling Hall Museum Bradford
Bradford
Industrial Museum Cartwright Hall National Media Museum Peace Museum

Haworth: Brontë Parsonage Museum

Ilkley: Ilkley
Ilkley
Toy Museum Manor House Museum

Keighley: Cliffe Castle Museum East Riddlesden
Riddlesden
Hall Keighley
Keighley
and Worth Valley
Worth Valley
Railway Museum of Rail Travel

Saltaire: Salts Mill

Calderdale
Calderdale
museums

Brighouse: Smith Art Gallery

Halifax: Bankfield Museum Dean Clough Eureka! The National Children's Museum

Hebden Bridge: Gibson Mill

Heptonstall: Heptonstall
Heptonstall
Museum

Shibden: Shibden
Shibden
Hall

Kirklees
Kirklees
museums

Batley
Batley
& Birstall: Bagshaw Museum, Oakwell Hall

Dewsbury: Dewsbury
Dewsbury
Bus Museum Dewsbury
Dewsbury
Museum

Gomersal: Red House Museum

Huddersfield: Castle Hill Colne Valley Museum Rugby League Heritage Centre Tolson Museum

Marsden: Standedge Tunnel Visitor Centre

City of Leeds
Leeds
museums

Aberford: Lotherton Hall

Leeds: Abbey House Museum Armley Mills Industrial Museum Bramham Park Harewood House Henry Moore Institute in Leeds Kirkstall Abbey Leeds
Leeds
Art Gallery Leeds
Leeds
City Museum Leeds
Leeds
College of Art Middleton Railway
Middleton Railway
Museum Royal Armouries Museum Temple Newsam Thackray Museum Thwaite Mills Museum

Otley: Otley
Otley
Museum

City of Wakefield
City of Wakefield
museums

Netherton: National Coal Mining Museum for England

Nostell: Nostell
Nostell
Priory

Pontefract: Pontefract
Pontefract
Museum

Wakefield: The Hepworth Wakefield Wakefield
Wakefield
Museum

v t e

Cinema of the United Kingdom

Culture of the United Kingdom

Films by year

Pre 1920 1920 1921 1922 1923 1924 1925 1926 1927 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016

Production companies and studios

Active

Aardman
Aardman
Animations BBC
BBC
Films Big Talk
Talk
Productions British Lion Films DNA Films Double Negative (VFX) Ealing Studios Elstree Studios Eon Productions Film4
Film4
Productions Framestore Goldcrest Films Hammer Film Productions HandMade Films Heyday Films The Imaginarium Studios London Films Longcross Studios Palace Pictures Passion Pictures The Pinewood Studios
Pinewood Studios
Group

Pinewood Studios Shepperton Studios

Recorded Picture Company Scott Free Productions Syncopy Inc. S4C
S4C
Films Thin Man Films Vertigo Films Warner Bros. Studios, Leavesden Warp Films Wimbledon Studios Working Title Films

Former

Amicus Productions Associated British Picture Corporation Astra Films British Instructional Films British National Films Company Butcher's Film Service Clarendon Film Company Bryanston Films The Danzigers Denham Film Studios Eagle-Lion Films Eros Films G. B. Samuelson Productions Gainsborough Pictures General Film Distributors Halas and Batchelor Hemdale Film Corporation Ideal Film Company Mancunian Films MGM-British Studios Merton Park Studios Rank Organisation Southall Studios Stoll Pictures Tempean Films Tigon British Film Productions Warwick Films Woolf & Freedman Film Service

Organisations

BAFTA British Board of Film Classification British Film Institute BFI National Archive BFI Southbank British Society of Cinematographers Children's Film Foundation Cinema Exhibitors' Association National Film and Television
Television
School National Science and Media Museum Northern Ireland Screen Scottish Screen UK Film Council

People

Actors and actresses Directors

Other

British Academy Film Awards British Independent Film Awards British New Wave Carry On Cinematograph Films Act 1927 Documentary Film Movement Eady Levy Ealing comedies Edgar Wallace Mysteries Free Cinema Gainsborough melodramas Harry Potter History of British film certificates Home Video Charts James Bond London Film Festival Look at Life London in film National Theatre Live Telecinema

Category

v t e

Media in the United Kingdom

UK national newspapers, magazines, and other periodicals

Newspapers (History)

Berliner

The Guardian The Observer

Broadsheet

Financial Times The Daily Telegraph The Sunday Telegraph The Sunday Times

Compact

i The Times

Middle-market

Daily Express Daily Mail The Mail on Sunday

Tabloid

Daily Mirror Sunday Mirror Morning Star The Sunday People Daily Star Daily Star Sunday The Sun Sunday Sport

Magazines & other periodicals

List of magazines by circulation

Radio in the UK

National stations

BBC

Analogue / digital Radio 1 Radio 2 Radio 3 Radio 4 5 Live Digital only Radio 1Xtra Radio 4 Extra 5 Live Sports Extra 6 Music Asian Network World Service BBC
BBC
National DAB (multiplex)

Independent / commercial

Analogue / digital Absolute Radio Classic FM Heart Kiss Talksport Digital only Absolute 80s Absolute 90s BFBS Radio Capital Xtra Digital One (multiplex) Heart 80s Heart Extra heat The Hits Jazz FM Kerrang! Kiss Fresh Kisstory LBC Magic Planet Rock Premier Christian Radio Radio X RNIB Connect Radio Sound Digital (multiplex) Smooth Extra Talkradio UCB UK Virgin Radio UK

Regional & local stations

BBC

List of BBC
BBC
Local Radio stations List of BBC
BBC
Regional Radio stations

Independent / commercial

List of community radio stations List of local commercial radio stations List of semi-national / regional analogue and digital radio stations

Other stations

List of hospital radio stations Pirate radio Restricted Service Licence (RSL)

List of RSL stations

List of satellite radio stations List of student and schools radio

Other

Broadcasting House FM broadcasting The Studios, MediaCityUK Radio Academy

Radio Academy Awards

Radio Independents Group RAJAR Most listened to programmes

Television
Television
in the UK

Principal channels (List)

BBC

BBC
BBC
One BBC
BBC
Two BBC
BBC
Four BBC
BBC
News BBC
BBC
Parliament CBBC CBeebies

ITV

ITV ITV2 ITV3 ITV4 CITV ITV Encore ITVBe ITV Box Office

Ch 4

Channel 4 E4 Film4 More4 4seven

Ch 5

Channel 5 5Prime 5Spike 5Star 5USA

Sky

Challenge Pick Real Lives Sky One Sky Two Sky Arts Sky Atlantic Sky Cinema Sky Living Sky News Sky Sports Sky Sports
Sky Sports
F1 Sky Sports
Sky Sports
News

UKTV

Alibi Dave Drama Eden Gold Good Food Home Really W Yesterday

Sony Pictures Television

Chart Show TV Chart Show Hits Movies4Men Pop Pop Max Starz TV Sony Channel Sony Movie Channel Scuzz Tiny Pop True Crime True Entertainment True Movies truTV The Vault

Services & platforms

All 4

Film4oD

analogue

analogue terrestrial (defunct)

BBC
BBC
iPlayer

BBC
BBC
Three

BBC
BBC
Store TalkTalk TV
TalkTalk TV
Store BT TV cable digital

digital terrestrial List of channels

Freesat

Freesat+

Freeview high-definition

List of channels

ITV

ITV Hub, STV Player

local television My5 Now TV (Sky plc) Real Digital Restricted Service Licence satellite

List of channels

Sky

Freesat
Freesat
from Sky On Demand Sky+ Sky+
Sky+
HD

Talk Talk
Talk
TV Top Up TV TVPlayer Virgin Media

FilmFlex TiVo V+

YouView Zattoo

Studios

Current

BBC
BBC
Elstree Centre BBC
BBC
Pacific Quay The Bottle Yard Studios Broadcasting House Broadcasting House, Belfast Broadcasting House, Bristol Broadcasting House, Cardiff Elstree Studios
Elstree Studios
(Shenley Road) Gas Street Studios The Leeds
Leeds
Studios The London Studios The Maidstone Studios Mailbox Birmingham MediaCityUK Osterley Television
Television
Centre Roath Lock Television
Television
Centre, London

Defunct

British and Dominions Imperial Studios Fountain Studios Gate Studios Granada Studios MGM-British Studios Pebble Mill Studios Teddington Studios Television
Television
Centre, Newcastle upon Tyne Television
Television
Centre, Southampton Upper Boat Studios

Other

Defunct channels Edinburgh International Television
Television
Festival History

List of years

List of channels Student television Viewing statistics

Most-watched broadcasts

Companies and organisations

Companies

Major companies

Archant Ascential Bauer Radio BBC Bloomsbury Publishing BT Group Channel Four Television
Television
Corporation Daily Mail
Daily Mail
and General Trust Dentsu Aegis Network Economist Group EMI Music Publishing Endemol Shine UK Global Group Guardian Media Group Haymarket Media Group Informa ITN ITV plc Johnston Press Mecom Group News UK Newsquest Northern & Shell Now TV (Sky plc) Pearson plc Press Holdings RELX Group Reuters Sky UK
Sky UK
Limited Sky plc STV Group Syco Talk Talk
Talk
Group Time Inc. UK Trinity Mirror UBM plc Virgin Media Wireless Group

Other resources

Arqiva List of largest UK book publishers

Government & regulatory bodies

Advertising Standards Authority BBC
BBC
Trust British Board of Film Classification British Film Institute Culture, Media, and Sport Select Committee Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Independent Press Standards Organisation Ofcom Press Recognition Panel S4C
S4C
Authority

Industry & trades bodies

British Academy of Film and Television
Television
Arts British Phonographic Industry Broadcasting, Entertainment, Cinematograph and Theatre Union Clearcast Digital TV Group Digital UK Equity Federation Against Copyright Theft National Union of Journalists The Publishers Association Royal Television
Television
Society United Kingdom Independent Broadcasting

Other

BBC
BBC
Academy National Film and Television
Television
School National Science and Media Museum

Regional and student media

Regional media

Media in England

Birmingham London Manchester

Media in Scotland

Aberdeen Dundee Glasgow

Media in Wales

Cardiff

Student media

Student televisi

.