HOME
        TheInfoList






London Bridge National Rail
London January 5 2018 (47) London Bridge Station (38813334494).jpg
Main station concourse in January 2018
London Bridge is located in Central London
London Bridge
London Bridge
Location of London Bridge in Central London
LocationSouthwark
Local authorityLondon Borough of Southwark
Managed byNetwork Rail
Station codeLBG
DfT categoryA
Number of platforms15
AccessibleYes[1]
Fare zone1
OSI
London Bridge London Underground
London Bridge City Pier London River Services
National Rail annual entry and exit
2014–15Decrease 49.517 million[3]
– interchange Decrease 8.454 millioncentral London railway terminus and connected London Underground station in Southwark, south-east London. It occupies a large area on three levels immediately south-east of London Bridge, from which it takes its name. The main line station is the oldest railway station in London fare zone 1 and one of the oldest in the world having opened in 1836. It is one of two main line termini in London to the south of the River Thames (the other being Waterloo) and is the fourth-busiest station in London, handling over 50 million customers a year.

The station was originally opened by the London and Greenwich Railway as a local service. It subsequently served the London and Croydon Railway, the London and Brighton Railway and the South Eastern Railway, thus becoming an important London terminus. It was rebuilt in 1849 and again in 1864 to provide more services and increase capacity. Local services from London Bridge began to be electrified in the beginning of the 20th century, and had spread to national routes by the 1930s. The station was extensively rebuilt by British Rail during the 1970s, along with a comprehensive re-signalling scheme and track alignment. It was further redeveloped in the 2010s to better accommodate the Thameslink route which provides a connection to Gatwick Airport, Luton Airport and Crossrail.

London Bridge is served by Southeastern services from Charing Cross and Cannon Street to destinations in southeast London, Kent and East Sussex and is a terminus for many Southern commuter and regional services to south London and numerous destinations in South East England. Thameslink services from Bedford, Cambridge and Peterborough to Brighton and other destinations in Sussex and Kent began serving the station in 2018.

Location

The main line station is one of 19 UK stations managed by Network Rail.[4] It has a ticket hall and entrance area with its main frontage on Tooley Street, and other entrances on Borough High Street and within the main line station concourse. It is one of two mainline London termini south of the River Thames, the other is Waterloo.[5]

The Underground station is on the Jubilee line and the Bank branch of the Northern line.[6] River buses use the nearby London Bridge City Pier.[7]

History

London Bridge station was opened on 14 December 1836, making it the oldest London railway terminus that is still running.[8] It was not the earliest station in the London metropolitan area, as the London and Greenwich Railway had opened stations at Spa Road (in Bermondsey) and Deptford on 8 February 1836. The completion of the line into London Bridge was postponed because of delays in constructing a bridge at Bermondsey Street. From 10 October 1836, trains were able to operate as far as the east end of this bridge, with passengers having to walk the last 300 yards (270 m).[9] The station has had several changes of ownership and complete rebuilds since opening.[8]

London and Greenwich Railway station

The original London and Greenwich Railway station in December 1836

The original station had four tracks and was 60 feet (18 m) wide and 400 feet (120 m) long. It was approached through a pair of iron gates.[10] Three tracks led into two platforms as a stub end of a viaduct.[9] The station was entirely exposed to the weather until a tarred canvas roof was erected in 1840.[9] Sixteen columns and fourteen beams from this structure were retrieved in 2013 and given to the Vale of Rheidol Railway in Aberystwyth, Wales for use in a planned railway museum.[11]

Before completing the train shed, the London and Greenwich Railway entered into an agreement with the proposed London and Croydon Railway for the latter to use its tracks from Corbett's Lane, Bermondsey, and to share its station. However, the Greenwich railway had underestimated the cost of building the long viaduct leading to London Bridge and was not able to build a sufficiently large station for the traffic for both companies, and so in July 1836 it sold some land adjacent to its station (then still under construction) to the Croydon railway to build their own independent station.[12]

London and Croydon Railway station

A 1908 Railway Clearing House map of lines around the approaches to London Bridge

The London and Brighton Railway and the South Eastern Railway (SER) were also planning routes from London to Brighton and Dover respectively, and the British Parliament decided that the London and Greenwich line should become the entry corridor into London from South East England. The two railways were therefore required to share the route of the London and Croydon Railway from near Norwood (which in turn shared the route of the London and Greenwich Railway from Bermondsey to London Bridge). As a result, in 1838 the London and Croydon Railway obtained powers to enlarge the station it was then constructing at London Bridge, before it had opened for traffic.[13]

The London and Croydon Railway opened its line and began using its station on 5 June 1839; the London and Brighton Railway joined it on 12 July 1841, followed by the South Eastern Railway in 26 May 1842.[14] It was soon found that the viaduct approaching London Bridge would be inadequate to deal with the traffic generated by four railways, so it was widened by the Greenwich Railway between 1840 and 1842, doubling the number of tracks to four. The new lines, intended for the Croydon, Brighton and South Eastern trains, were situated on the south side of the existing Greenwich line, whereas their station was to the north of the London Bridge site, leading to an awkward and potentially dangerous crossing of one another's lines. The directors of the companies involved decided to exchange sites; the London and Greenwich Railway would take over the newly completed London and Croydon Railway station, whilst a new joint committee of the Croydon, Brighton and South Eastern companies would demolish the first station and build a new one on its site.[15]

Joint station

The proposed London Bridge joint station c. 1844

Plans for a large new station were drawn up, designed jointly by London and Greenwich Railway as a local service. It subsequently served the London and Croydon Railway, the London and Brighton Railway and the South Eastern Railway, thus becoming an important London terminus. It was rebuilt in 1849 and again in 1864 to provide more services and increase capacity. Local services from London Bridge began to be electrified in the beginning of the 20th century, and had spread to national routes by the 1930s. The station was extensively rebuilt by British Rail during the 1970s, along with a comprehensive re-signalling scheme and track alignment. It was further redeveloped in the 2010s to better accommodate the Thameslink route which provides a connection to Gatwick Airport, Luton Airport and Crossrail.

London Bridge is served by Southeastern services from Charing Cross and Cannon Street to destinations in southeast London, Kent and East Sussex and is a terminus for many Southern commuter and regional services to south London and numerous destinations in South East England. Thameslink services from Bedford, Cambridge and Peterborough to Brighton and other destinations in Sussex and Kent began serving the station in 2018.

The main line station is one of 19 UK stations managed by Network Rail.[4] It has a ticket hall and entrance area with its main frontage on Tooley Street, and other entrances on Borough High Street and within the main line station concourse. It is one of two mainline London termini south of the River Thames, the other is Waterloo.[5]

The Underground station is on the Jubilee line and the Bank branch of the Northern line.[6] River buses use the nearby London Bridge City Pier.[7]

History

London Bridge station was opened on 14 December 1836, making it the oldest London railway terminus that is still running.[8] It was not the earliest station in the London metropolitan area, as the London and Greenwich Railway had opened stations at Spa Road (in Bermondsey) and Deptford on 8 February 1836. The completion of the line into London Bridge was postponed because of delays in constructing a bridge at Bermondsey Street. From 10 October 1836, trains were able to operate as far as the east end of this bridge, with passengers having to walk the last 300 yards (270 m).[9] The station has had several changes of ownership and complete rebuilds since opening.[8]

London and Greenwich Railway station

The original London and Greenwich Railway station in December 1836

The original station had four tracks and was 60 feet (18 m) wide and 400 feet (120 m) long. It was approached through a pair of iron gates.[10] Three tracks led into two platforms as a stub end of a viaduct.Jubilee line and the Bank branch of the Northern line.[6] River buses use the nearby London Bridge City Pier.[7]

London Bridge station was opened on 14 December 1836, making it the oldest London railway terminus that is still running.[8] It was not the earliest station in the London metropolitan area, as the London and Greenwich Railway had opened stations at Spa Road (in Bermondsey) and Deptford on 8 February 1836. The completion of the line into London Bridge was postponed because of delays in constructing a bridge at Bermondsey Street. From 10 October 1836, trains were able to operate as far as the east end of this bridge, with passengers having to walk the last 300 yards (270 m).[9] The station has had several changes of ownership and complete rebuilds since opening.[8]

London and Greenwich Railway station

  • ^ This figure was decreased by 2.270 million due to methodological changes. Without the changes, the figure would have been 56.121 million.
  • ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Station usage estimates". Rail statistics. Office of Rail Regulation. Please note: Some methodology may vary year on year.
  • ^ "Commercial information". Our Stations. London: Network Rail. April 2014. Archived from the original on 10 April 2014. Retrieved 12 April 2014.
  • ^ "London Bridge station". Google Maps. Select StreetView to examine the various entrances. Retrieved 18 October 2017.Southeastern to/from Charing Cross

    The typical weekday off-peak service in trains per hour (tph) is:

    Southeastern to/from Cannon Street[79]

    The typical weekday off-peak service in trains per hour (tph) is:

    Southern

    The typical weekday off-peak services in trains per hour (tph) is:[80]

    Thameslink

    The typical weekday off-peak service in trains per hour (tph) is:[81][82]