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The Info List - Brian Sipe


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Brian Winfield Sipe (born August 8, 1949) is a former professional American football
American football
quarterback who played for the Cleveland Browns
Cleveland Browns
of the National Football League
National Football League
(NFL) from 1974 to 1983. He then played in the United States Football League
United States Football League
for two seasons. Although mostly sidelined for the first several years of his NFL career, Sipe was eventually recognized as one of the better quarterbacks in Browns history, winning the league's MVP Award in 1980. He was a college football star under head coach Don Coryell
Don Coryell
at San Diego
San Diego
State University, where he studied architecture and became the team's quarterbacks coach in 2009, remaining in that role for five years, through 2014.[1] He also competed in the 1961 Little League World Series for El Cajon, California, and prepped at Grossmont High School.

Contents

1 Playing career

1.1 National Football League

1.1.1 1980 MVP award winning season 1.1.2 1981-82 seasons

1.2 United States Football League

2 Post-playing career 3 Career stats 4 See also 5 References 6 External links

Playing career[edit] National Football League[edit] Drafted in the 13th round of the 1972 NFL Draft by the Cleveland Browns, Sipe spent the first two years of his career as a member of the team's reserve squad, seeing no action on the field. In 1974, Sipe started four games after helping the Browns come back from a 12-point deficit against the Denver Broncos
Denver Broncos
on October 27. However, after winning just one of the four contests (a 21-14 victory against the New England Patriots
New England Patriots
on November 11), he was replaced by Mike Phipps. The team's disastrous 1975 season saw Sipe enter the starting lineup after three consecutive losses in which the Browns were outscored 124-26. Sipe's three starts reduced the margin of defeat for the squad, but still resulted in a trio of defeats, sending him back to the sidelines. The following year, he finally moved into a consistent starting role following an opening game injury to Phipps on September 12, 1976. As the team's signal caller that season, he led them to a 9-5 record, a six-game improvement over the previous season. During the first half of the 1977 season, he led the team to five wins in their first seven games. However, on November 13 of that year, Sipe suffered a season-ending shoulder injury at Three Rivers Stadium against the Pittsburgh Steelers
Pittsburgh Steelers
in the second quarter of the team's 35-31 defeat. Sipe came back the following year to throw for more than 2,900 yards and 21 touchdown passes, but the team's overall inconsistency resulted in an 8-8 finish. Serving as the catalyst for many thrilling moments during the 1979 and 1980 seasons, Sipe helped the team earn the nickname "Kardiac Kids." The designation was in recognition of their tendency to produce heart-stopping comeback victories in the final minutes of many games. Over the course of these two seasons, Sipe led the Browns to eight comebacks and eleven game-winning drives in the fourth quarter or overtime.[2] 1980 MVP award winning season[edit] In 1980, Sipe passed for 4,132 yards and 30 touchdowns, helping to lead the Browns to their first postseason berth since 1972. Individually, his efforts earned him the NFL MVP
NFL MVP
award and a selection to the 1981 Pro Bowl. At the end of the divisional playoff game the Browns played against the Raiders following the 1980 NFL season, the Browns trailed the Raiders with a score of 14-12. After the Browns forced the Raiders to turn the ball over on downs on their own 15-yard line, Sipe led the Browns back down the field, reaching the Raiders 13-yard line in just 5 plays. With just 49 seconds remaining, the Browns could have settled for a game-winning field goal, but due to the brutally cold and windy weather in Cleveland that day (which rendered a field goal attempt significantly more risky) Browns head coach Sam Rutigliano
Sam Rutigliano
instead opted to pass the ball. Sipe attempted a pass to Browns Hall of Fame tight end Ozzie Newsome, but it was intercepted in the end zone by Raiders safety Mike Davis. That play brought the Browns' season to a heartbreaking close, while the Raiders went on to win Super Bowl XV over the Philadelphia Eagles. The play call - "Red Right 88" - would be immortalized in Cleveland sports infamy. 1981-82 seasons[edit]

Sipe signing autographs in Canton, Ohio in 1979.

Despite throwing for 3,876 yards the following year, Sipe was at the controls as the team staggered to a 5-11 mark. In 1982, Sipe and the Browns won just two of the team's first six games in the strike-marred NFL season, and Sipe was benched in favor of third-year signal caller Paul McDonald. United States Football League[edit] Sipe regained his starting role the following year, but angered Browns management by negotiating with springtime football's USFL
USFL
New Jersey Generals during the season. Sipe finished the season with 3,566 passing yards and 26 touchdown passes. He then signed with the Generals and played for them in 1984, before concluding his career with the Jacksonville Bulls
Jacksonville Bulls
in 1985. Post-playing career[edit] Sipe lives in San Diego
San Diego
and coached the football team at Santa Fe Christian School in Solana Beach, California, where he helped the Eagles to four CIF titles and a combined record of 75-21-1. Sipe was hired on January 18, 2009, as the quarterbacks coach for his alma mater, San Diego
San Diego
State. Sipe served in that role through the end of the 2014 season.[1] Career stats[edit]

Year Team GP Att Com Pct Yds TD Int Rate

1974 Cleveland Browns 10 108 59 54.6 603 1 7 47.0

1975 Cleveland Browns 7 88 45 51.1 427 1 3 54.4

1976 Cleveland Browns 14 312 178 57.1 2113 17 14 77.3

1977 Cleveland Browns 9 195 112 57.4 1233 9 14 61.8

1978 Cleveland Browns 16 399 222 55.6 2906 21 15 80.7

1979 Cleveland Browns 16 535 286 53.5 3793 28 26 73.4

1980 Cleveland Browns 16 554 337 60.8 4132 30 14 91.4

1981 Cleveland Browns 16 567 313 55.2 3876 17 25 68.2

1982 Cleveland Browns 6 185 101 54.6 1064 4 8 60.7

1983 Cleveland Browns 15 496 291 58.7 3566 26 23 79.1

NFL Career Totals

125 3439 1944 56.5 23713 154 149 74.8

1984 New Jersey Generals 16 324 192 59.3 2540 17 15 82.3

1985 Jacksonville Bulls - 89 55 61.8 685 4 2 91.5

USFL
USFL
Career Totals

- 413 247 56.5 3225 21 17 84.3

Key to Abbreviations GP= Games Played Att= Passes attempted Com= Passes Completed Pct= Completion percentage Yds= Yards TD= Touchdowns Int= Interceptions Rate= Passer rating See also[edit]

List of NCAA major college football yearly passing leaders Most consecutive starts by a quarterback (NFL)

References[edit]

^ a b Kiesel, Connor (2015-01-07). "Former Browns QB Sipe reportedly removed as San Diego
San Diego
State QB coach". Fox Sports. Retrieved 2016-01-20.  ^ "Brian Sipe's Career 4th quarter comebacks and game-winning drives" Pro-Football-Reference.com

External links[edit]

San Diego
San Diego
State Aztecs coaching bio

v t e

San Diego
San Diego
State Aztecs starting quarterbacks

Rod Dowhower Dennis Shaw Brian Sipe Jesse Freitas Jr. Craig Penrose Mark Halda Matt Kofler Todd Santos Tim Gutierrez Billy Blanton Dan McGwire David Lowrey Brian Russell Adam Hall Kevin O'Connell Kevin Craft Ryan Lindley Adam Dingwell Ryan Katz Quinn Kaehler Maxwell Smith Christian Chapman

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Cleveland Browns
Cleveland Browns
1972 NFL draft selections

Thom Darden Cliff Brooks Lester Sims George Hunt Greg Kucera Leonard Forey Don Wesley Hugh McKinnis Larry McKee Bill Lefear Herschell Mosier Mel Long Bernie Chapman Brian Sipe Ed Stewart Jewel McCuller Dick Wakefield Bill Portz

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Cleveland Browns
Cleveland Browns
starting quarterbacks

Cliff Lewis (1946–1947, 1949) Otto Graham
Otto Graham
(1946–1955) George Ratterman
George Ratterman
(1953–1956) Babe Parilli
Babe Parilli
(1956) Tommy O'Connell
Tommy O'Connell
(1956–1957) Milt Plum (1957–1961) Len Dawson
Len Dawson
(1961) Jim Ninowski (1962–1963, 1965) Frank Ryan (1962–1968) Gary Lane (1967) Bill Nelsen (1968–1972) Mike Phipps
Mike Phipps
(1970–1976) Don Gault (1970) Brian Sipe
Brian Sipe
(1974–1983) Will Cureton (1975) Dave Mays (1977) Terry Luck (1977) Paul McDonald (1982–1984) Gary Danielson
Gary Danielson
(1985–1988) Bernie Kosar
Bernie Kosar
(1985–1993) Jeff Christensen (1987) Mike Pagel (1988, 1990) Don Strock (1988) Mike Tomczak (1992) Todd Philcox (1992–1993) Vinny Testaverde
Vinny Testaverde
(1993–1995) Mark Rypien
Mark Rypien
(1994) Eric Zeier
Eric Zeier
(1995) Ty Detmer
Ty Detmer
(1999) Tim Couch (1999–2003) Doug Pederson
Doug Pederson
(2000) Spergon Wynn (2000) Kelly Holcomb (2002–2004) Jeff Garcia
Jeff Garcia
(2004) Luke McCown
Luke McCown
(2004) Trent Dilfer
Trent Dilfer
(2005) Charlie Frye
Charlie Frye
(2005–2007) Derek Anderson (2006–2009) Brady Quinn
Brady Quinn
(2008–2009) Ken Dorsey
Ken Dorsey
(2008) Bruce Gradkowski
Bruce Gradkowski
(2008) Jake Delhomme
Jake Delhomme
(2010) Seneca Wallace
Seneca Wallace
(2010–2011) Colt McCoy
Colt McCoy
(2010–2011) Brandon Weeden
Brandon Weeden
(2012–2013) Thad Lewis
Thad Lewis
(2012) Brian Hoyer
Brian Hoyer
(2013–2014) Jason Campbell
Jason Campbell
(2013) Johnny Manziel
Johnny Manziel
(2014–2015) Connor Shaw
Connor Shaw
(2014) Josh McCown
Josh McCown
(2015–2016) Austin Davis
Austin Davis
(2015) Robert Griffin III
Robert Griffin III
(2016) Cody Kessler
Cody Kessler
(2016) DeShone Kizer
DeShone Kizer
(2017) Kevin Hogan
Kevin Hogan
(2017)

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Associated Press NFL Most Valuable Player
NFL Most Valuable Player
Award winners

1957: J. Brown 1958: J. Brown 1959: Unitas 1960: Van Brocklin 1961: Hornung 1962: J. Taylor 1963: Tittle 1964: Unitas 1965: J. Brown 1966: Starr 1967: Unitas 1968: Morrall 1969: Gabriel 1970: Brodie 1971: Page 1972: L. Brown 1973: Simpson 1974: Stabler 1975: Tarkenton 1976: Jones 1977: Payton 1978: Bradshaw 1979: Campbell 1980: Sipe 1981: Anderson 1982: Moseley 1983: Theismann 1984: Marino 1985: Allen 1986: L. Taylor 1987: Elway 1988: Esiason 1989: Montana 1990: Montana 1991: Thomas 1992: Young 1993: Smith 1994: Young 1995: Favre 1996: Favre 1997: Favre & Sanders 1998: Davis 1999: Warner 2000: Faulk 2001: Warner 2002: Gannon 2003: Manning & McNair 2004: Manning 2005: Alexander 2006: Tomlinson 2007: Brady 2008: Manning 2009: Manning 2010: Brady 2011: Rodgers 2012: Peterson 2013: Manning 2014: Rodgers 2015: Newton 2016: Ryan 2017: Brady

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NFL annual passing touchdowns leaders

1932: Herber 1933: Newman 1934: Herber 1935: Danowski 1936: Herber 1937: Masterson 1938: Monnett 1939: Filchock 1940: Baugh 1941: Isbell 1942: Isbell 1943: Luckman 1944: Filchock 1945: Luckman & Waterfield 1946: Luckman & Waterfield 1947: Baugh 1948: Thompson 1949: Lujack 1950: Ratterman 1951: Layne 1952: Finks & Graham 1953: Thomason 1954: Burk 1955: Rote & Tittle 1956: Rote 1957: Unitas 1958: Unitas 1959: Unitas 1960: Unitas 1961: Jurgensen 1962: Tittle 1963: Tittle 1964: Ryan 1965: Brodie 1966: Ryan 1967: Jurgensen 1968: Morrall 1969: Gabriel 1970: Brodie 1971: Hadl 1972: Kilmer & Namath 1973: Gabriel & Staubach 1974: Stabler 1975: Ferguson & Tarkenton 1976: Stabler 1977: Griese 1978: Bradshaw 1979: Grogan & Sipe 1980: Bartkowski 1981: Fouts 1982: Bradshaw, Fouts & Montana 1983: Dickey 1984: Marino 1985: Marino 1986: Marino 1987: Montana 1988: Everett 1989: Everett 1990: Moon 1991: Kelly 1992: Young 1993: Young 1994: Young 1995: Favre 1996: Favre 1997: Favre 1998: Young 1999: Warner 2000: Culpepper & Manning 2001: Warner 2002: Brady 2003: Favre 2004: Manning 2005: Palmer 2006: Manning 2007: Brady 2008: Brees & Rivers 2009: Brees 2010: Brady 2011: Brees 2012: Brees 2013: Manning 2014: Luck 2015: Brady 2016: Rodgers 2017: Wilson

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NFL quarterbacks with a perfect passer rating game

Ray Mallouf Sammy Baugh Len Dawson Y. A. Tittle Frank Ryan Sonny Jurgensen Joe Namath Johnny Unitas Don Meredith Craig Morton (2) Fran Tarkenton Daryle Lamonica Dick Shiner Bob Lee James Harris Ken Anderson Jim Hart Dan Fouts Scott Hunter Terry Bradshaw Steve Grogan Brian Sipe Bob Griese Vince Evans Dave Krieg (2) Steve Bartkowski Ken O'Brien (2) Steve Young Joe Montana Rich Gannon Bobby Hebert Mick Buck Drew Bledsoe Craig Erickson Chris Chandler Jeff Blake Kurt Warner
Kurt Warner
(3) Peyton Manning
Peyton Manning
(4) Doug Flutie Kerry Collins Chad Pennington Trent Green Ben Roethlisberger
Ben Roethlisberger
(3) Donovan McNabb Tom Brady
Tom Brady
(2) Eli Manning Drew Brees Robert Griffin III Nick Foles Alex Smith Geno Smith Marcus Mariota Ryan Tannehill Kirk Cousins

Names in bold are still active

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 232543697 LCCN: no2012041599 ISNI: 0000 00

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