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Thermal Dissolution
Thermal dissolution is a method of liquefaction of solid fossil fuels. It is a hydrogen-donor solvent refining process. It may be used for the shale oil extraction and coal liquefaction.[1] Other liquids extraction processes from solid fuels are pyrolysis and hydrogenation.[2] Compared to hydrogenation, the process of thermal dissolution has milder conditions, simpler process, and no consumption of catalyst.[3]

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American Chemical Society

The American Chemical Society (ACS) is a scientific society based in the United States that supports scientific inquiry in the field of chemistry. Founded in 1876 at New York University, the ACS currently has nearly 157,000 members at all degree levels and in all fields of chemistry, chemical engineering, and related fields. It is one of the world's largest scientific societies by membership.[3] The ACS is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization and holds a congressional charter under Title 36 of the United States Code
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Tallinn University Of Technology
Established in 1918, Tallinn University of Technology (TalTech;
Estonian: Tallinna Tehnikaülikool) is the only technical university in Estonia. TalTech, in the capital city of Tallinn, is a university for engineering, business, public administration and maritime affairs.[1][2] TalTech has colleges in Tartu and Kohtla-Järve. Despite the similar names, Tallinn University and Tallinn University of Technology are separate institutions. In the early twentieth century, Estonia recognised an urgent need for locally trained engineering specialists. Until then, young people from Estonia had received their specialist education in St. Petersburg, Germany or Riga
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Estonia
Coordinates: 59°N 26°E / 59°N 26°E / 59; 26 In 1928, a stable currency, the kroon, was established. It is issued by the Bank of Estonia, the country's central bank. The word kroon (Estonian pronunciation: [ˈkroːn], "crown") is related to that of the other Nordic currencies (such as the Swedish krona and the Danish and Norwegian krone). The kroon succeeded the mark in 1928 and was used until 1940
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Doi (identifier)

A digital object identifier (DOI) is a persistent identifier or handle used to identify objects uniquely, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports, data sets, and official publications. However, they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to identify their referents uniquely
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Hydrogenation
Hydrogenation is a chemical reaction between molecular hydrogen (H2) and another compound or element, usually in the presence of a catalyst such as nickel, palladium or platinum. The process is commonly employed to reduce or saturate organic compounds. Hydrogenation typically constitutes the addition of pairs of hydrogen atoms to a molecule, often an alkene. Catalysts are required for the reaction to be usable; non-catalytic hydrogenation takes place only at very high temperatures. Hydrogenation reduces double and triple bonds in hydrocarbons.[1] Hydrogenation has three components, the unsaturated substrate, the hydrogen (or hydrogen source) and, invariably, a catalyst
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Pyrolysis
Pyrolysis is the thermal decomposition of materials at elevated temperatures in an inert atmosphere.[1] It involves a change of chemical composition. The word is coined from the Greek-derived elements pyro "fire" and lysis "separating". Pyrolysis is most commonly used in the treatment of organic materials. It is one of the processes involved in charring wood.[2] In general, pyrolysis of organic substances produces volatile products and leaves a solid residue enriched in carbon, char. Extreme pyrolysis, which leaves mostly carbon as the residue, is called carbonization
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Coal Liquefaction
Coal liquefaction is a process of converting coal into liquid hydrocarbons: liquid fuels and petrochemicals. This process is often known as "Coal to X", where X can be many different hydrocarbon-based products. However, the most common process chain is "Coal to Liquid Fuels" (CTL).[1] Coal liquefaction originally was developed at the beginning of the 20th century.[2] The best-known CTL process is Fischer–Tropsch synthesis (FT), named after the inventors Franz Fischer and Hans Tropsch from the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute in the 1920s.[3] The FT synthesis is the basis for indirect coal liquefaction (ICL) technology
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