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Stoke-on-Trent
STOKE-ON-TRENT (/stoʊk ɒn trɛnt/ ( listen ); often abbreviated to STOKE) is a city and unitary authority area in Staffordshire
Staffordshire
, England, with an area of 36 square miles (93 km2). Together with the neighbouring boroughs of Newcastle-under-Lyme and Staffordshire Moorlands , it is part of North Staffordshire
Staffordshire
, which, in 2011, had a population of 469,000. Stoke is polycentric , having been formed by a federation of six towns in the early 20th century. It took its name from Stoke-upon-Trent , where the town hall and the railway station are located. Hanley is the primary commercial centre. The four other towns are Burslem
Burslem
, Tunstall , Longton and Fenton . Stoke-on-Trent
Stoke-on-Trent
is the home of the pottery industry in England
England
and is commonly known as the Potteries . Formerly a primarily industrial conurbation , it is now a centre for service industries and distribution centres
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Stoke-on-Trent (other)
STOKE-ON-TRENT is a city in Staffordshire, England. STOKE-ON-TRENT may also refer to: * Stoke-upon-Trent , a constituent town of the city of Stoke-on-TrentPARLIAMENTARY CONSTITUENCIES * Stoke-upon-Trent (UK Parliament constituency) , a UK parliamentary constituency that existed between 1832–1918 * Stoke-on-Trent, Stoke (UK Parliament constituency) , a UK parliamentary constituency that existed between 1918–1950 * Burslem (UK Parliament constituency) , a UK parliamentary constituency that existed between 1918–1950; sometimes referred to as STOKE-ON-TRENT, BURSLEM * Hanley (UK Parliament constituency) , a UK parliamentary constituency that existed between 1885–1918; known as STOKE-ON-TRENT, HANLEY between 1918–1950 * Stoke-on-Trent Central (UK Parliament constituency) , a current UK parliamentary constituency existing since 1950 * Stoke-on-Trent North (UK Parliament constituency) , a current UK parliamentary constituency existing since 1950 * Stoke-on-Trent South (UK Parliament constituency) , a current UK parliamentary constituency existing since 1950 This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title STOKE-ON-TRENT. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article. Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Stoke-on-Trent_(other) additional terms may apply
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City Status In The United Kingdom
CITY STATUS IN THE UNITED KINGDOM is granted by the monarch of the United Kingdom to a select group of communities: as of 2014 , there are 69 cities in the United Kingdom – 51 in England , six in Wales , seven in Scotland and five in Northern Ireland . The holding of city status gives a settlement no special rights other than that of calling itself a _city_. Nonetheless, this appellation carries its own prestige and, consequently, competitions for the status are hard fought. The status does not apply automatically on the basis of any particular criteria, although in England and Wales it was traditionally given to towns with diocesan cathedrals . This association between having a cathedral and being called a city was established in the early 1540s when King Henry VIII founded dioceses (each having a cathedral in the see city ) in six English towns and also granted them city status by issuing letters patent . City status in Ireland was granted to far fewer communities than in England and Wales, and there are only two pre–19th-century cities in present-day Northern Ireland . In Scotland, city status did not explicitly receive any recognition by the state until the 19th century
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Unitary Authorities Of England
UNITARY AUTHORITIES OF ENGLAND are local authorities that are responsible for the provision of all local government services within a district. They are constituted under the Local Government Act 1992 , which amended the Local Government Act 1972 to allow the existence of counties that do not have multiple districts. They typically allow large towns to have separate local authorities from the less urbanised parts of their counties and provide a single authority for small counties where division into districts would be impractical. Unitary authorities do not cover all of England. Most were established during the 1990s and a further tranche were created in 2009 . Unitary authorities have the powers and functions that are elsewhere separately administered by councils of non-metropolitan counties and the non-metropolitan districts within them. CONTENTS* 1 History * 1.1 Background * 1.2 1990s reform * 1.3 2009 changes * 2 Functions * 3 Electoral arrangements * 4 Current list * 5 Similar authorities * 6 See also * 7 Footnotes * 8 References HISTORYBACKGROUNDThe term "unitary authority " was first used in the Redcliffe-Maud Report in 1969 in its current sense of a local government authority which combines the functions of a county council and a district council
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The Potteries
The STAFFORDSHIRE POTTERIES is the industrial area encompassing the six towns, Tunstall , Burslem , Hanley , Stoke , Fenton and Longton that now make up the city of Stoke-on-Trent in Staffordshire
Staffordshire
, England. North Staffordshire
Staffordshire
became a centre of ceramic production in the early 17th century, due to the local availability of clay, salt, lead and coal. Hundreds of companies produced decorative or industrial items. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 See also * 3 References * 4 External links HISTORYThe boom came after the discovery in 1720 by potter John Astbury of Shelton , that by adding heated and ground flint powder to the local reddish clay could create a more palatable white or cream ware. The flint was sourced from either the South Coast of England or France
France
, and then shipped to the Port of Liverpool or Shardlow
Shardlow
on the River Trent . After shipping to the watermills locally to the potteries, or commercial flint grinding mills in either the Churnet Valley or Moddershall Valley by pack horses , it was sorted to remove the flint with reddish-hues, and then heated to 1,200 °C (2,190 °F) to create an easily ground product
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Anna Of The Five Towns
'ANNA OF THE FIVE TOWNS\' is a novel by Arnold Bennett
Arnold Bennett
, first published in 1902 and one of his best-known works. CONTENTS * 1 Plot summary * 2 "The Five Towns" * 3 BBC
BBC
adaptations * 4 References * 5 External links PLOT SUMMARYThe plot centres on Anna Tellwright, daughter of a wealthy but miserly and dictatorial father, living in the Potteries area of Staffordshire
Staffordshire
, England. Her activities are strictly controlled by the Methodist church. The novel tells of Anna's struggle for freedom and independence against her father's restraints, and her inward battle between wanting to please her father and wanting to help Willie Price whose father, Titus Price, commits suicide after falling into bankruptcy and debt. During the novel, Anna is courted by the town's most eligible bachelor Henry Mynors, and agrees to be his wife, much to her young sister Agnes' pleasure. She discovers in the end, however, that she loves Willie Price, but does not follow her heart, as he is leaving for Australia, and she is already promised to Mynors. Willie then also commits suicide. "THE FIVE TOWNS" Stoke-on-Trent has become known as "The Five Towns", because of the name given to it by local novelist Arnold Bennett
Arnold Bennett
. In his novels, Bennett used mostly recognisable aliases for five of the six towns (although he called Stoke "Knype")
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Geographic Coordinate System
A GEOGRAPHIC COORDINATE SYSTEM is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position , and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position . A common choice of coordinates is latitude , longitude and elevation . To specify a location on a two-dimensional map requires a map projection
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List Of Sovereign States
This LIST OF SOVEREIGN STATES provides an overview of sovereign states around the world , with information on their status and recognition of their sovereignty . Membership within the United Nations
United Nations
system divides the 206 listed states into three categories: 193 member states , two observer states , and 11 other states. The _sovereignty dispute_ column indicates states whose sovereignty is undisputed (190 states) and states whose sovereignty is disputed (16 states, out of which there are 6 member states, 1 observer state and 9 other states). Compiling a list such as this can be a difficult and controversial process, as there is no definition that is binding on all the members of the community of nations concerning the criteria for statehood . For more information on the criteria used to determine the contents of this list, please see the _criteria for inclusion _ section below. The list is intended to include entities that have been recognized to have _de facto_ status as sovereign states, and inclusion should not be seen as an endorsement of any specific claim to statehood in legal terms
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United Kingdom
The UNITED KINGDOM OF GREAT BRITAIN AND NORTHERN IRELAND, commonly known as the UNITED KINGDOM (UK) or BRITAIN, is a sovereign country in western Europe. Lying off the north-western coast of the European mainland , the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
includes the island of Great Britain
Great Britain
, the north-eastern part of the island of Ireland
Ireland
and many smaller islands. Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
is the only part of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
that shares a land border with another sovereign state‍—‌the Republic of Ireland
Ireland
. Apart from this land border, the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
is surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
, with the North Sea to its east, the English Channel to its south and the Celtic Sea to its south-south-west, giving it the 12th-longest coastline in the world . The Irish Sea lies between Great Britain
Great Britain
and Ireland. With an area of 242,500 square kilometres (93,600 sq mi), the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
is the 78th-largest sovereign state in the world and the 11th-largest in Europe
Europe
. It is also the 21st-most populous country , with an estimated 65.1 million inhabitants
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Countries Of The United Kingdom
The United Kingdom (UK) comprises four countries : England , Scotland , Wales and Northern Ireland . Within the United Kingdom, a unitary sovereign state , Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales have gained a degree of autonomy through the process of devolution . The UK Parliament and British Government deal with all _reserved matters _ for Northern Ireland and Scotland and all _non-transferred matters_ for Wales, but not in general matters that have been devolved to the Northern Ireland Assembly , Scottish Parliament and National Assembly for Wales . Additionally, devolution in Northern Ireland is conditional on co-operation between the Northern Ireland Executive and the Government of Ireland (see North/South Ministerial Council ) and the British Government consults with the Government of Ireland to reach agreement on some non-devolved matters for Northern Ireland (see British–Irish Intergovernmental Conference ). England, comprising the majority of the population and area of the United Kingdom, remains fully the responsibility of the UK Parliament centralised in London . England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales are not themselves listed in the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) list of countries
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England
ENGLAND is a country that is part of the United Kingdom . It shares land borders with Scotland to the north and Wales to the west. The Irish Sea lies northwest of England and the Celtic Sea lies to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain (which lies in the North Atlantic ) in its centre and south; and includes over 100 smaller islands such as the Isles of Scilly , and the Isle of Wight . The area now called England was first inhabited by modern humans during the Upper Palaeolithic period, but takes its name from the Angles , one of the Germanic tribes who settled during the 5th and 6th centuries. England became a unified state in the 10th century, and since the Age of Discovery , which began during the 15th century, has had a significant cultural and legal impact on the wider world. The English language , the Anglican Church , and English law – the basis for the common law legal systems of many other countries around the world – developed in England, and the country's parliamentary system of government has been widely adopted by other nations
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Regions Of England
The REGIONS (formerly known as the GOVERNMENT OFFICE REGIONS; GORS) are the highest tier of sub-national division in England . Between 1994 and 2011, nine regions had officially devolved functions within Government. While they no longer fulfil this role, they continue to be used for statistical and some administrative purposes. They define areas (constituencies) for the purposes of elections to the European Parliament . Eurostat also uses them to demarcate first level Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics (NUTS) regions ("NUTS 1 regions") within the European Union . The regions generally follow the boundaries of the former standard regions , established in the 1940s for statistical purposes. The London region (also known as Greater London ) has a directly elected Mayor and Assembly . Six regions have local authority leaders\' boards to assist with correlating the headline policies of local authorities. The remaining two regions no longer have any administrative functions, having abolished their regional local authority leaders' boards. In 1998, regional chambers were established in the eight regions outside of London, which produced strategic plans and recommendations to local authorities
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West Midlands (region)
The WEST MIDLANDS is one of nine official regions of England
England
at the first level of NUTS for statistical purposes. It covers the western half of the area traditionally known as the Midlands . It contains the second most populous British city, Birmingham
Birmingham
, and the larger West Midlands conurbation , which includes the city of Wolverhampton
Wolverhampton
and large towns of Dudley
Dudley
, Solihull , Walsall and West Bromwich . The city of Coventry
Coventry
is also located within the West Midlands county
West Midlands county
, but is separated from the conurbation to the west by several miles of green belt . The region is geographically diverse, from the urban central areas of the conurbation to the rural western counties of Shropshire
Shropshire
and Herefordshire which border Wales
Wales
. The longest river in the UK, the River Severn , traverses the region southeastwards, flowing through the county towns of Shrewsbury
Shrewsbury
and Worcester
Worcester
, and the Ironbridge Gorge , a UNESCO World Heritage Site , as birthplace of the Industrial Revolution
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Ceremonial Counties Of England
The CEREMONIAL COUNTIES, also referred to as the LIEUTENANCY AREAS OF ENGLAND, are areas of England to which a Lord Lieutenant is appointed. Legally the areas in England, as well as in Wales and Scotland, are defined by the Lieutenancies Act 1997 as COUNTIES AND AREAS FOR THE PURPOSES OF THE LIEUTENANCIES IN GREAT BRITAIN, in contrast to the areas used for local government . They are also informally known as GEOGRAPHIC COUNTIES, as often representing more permanent features of English geography, and to distinguish them from counties of England which have a present-day administrative function. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Shrieval counties * 3 Definition * 3.1 Ceremonial counties since 1997 * 4 Lieutenancy areas in 1890 * 5 See also * 6 References * 7 Notes * 8 External links HISTORY Ceremonial counties before the creation of Greater London in 1965 (showing counties corporate as part of the main counties.) The distinction between a county for purposes of the Lieutenancy and a county for administrative purposes is not a new one: in some cases a county corporate that was part of a county was appointed its own Lieutenant (although the Lieutenant of the containing county would often be appointed to this position as well), and the three Ridings of Yorkshire had been treated as three counties for Lieutenancy purposes since the 17th century
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Staffordshire
STAFFORDSHIRE (/ˈstæfədʃɪər/ or /ˈstæfədʃə/ ; abbreviated STAFFS) is a landlocked county in the West Midlands of England. It adjoins Cheshire to the north west, Derbyshire and Leicestershire to the east, Warwickshire to the south east, West Midlands and Worcestershire to the south, and Shropshire to the west. Stone railway station in Stone . The largest city in Staffordshire is Stoke-on-Trent , which is administered separately from the rest of the county as an independent unitary authority . Lichfield also has city status , although this is a considerably smaller cathedral city . Major towns include Stafford (the county town), Burton upon Trent , Cannock , Newcastle-under-Lyme , Leek , and Tamworth . Smaller towns include Stone , Uttoxeter , Rugeley , Eccleshall , Penkridge and large villages Wombourne , Kinver , Tutbury and Stretton . Cannock Chase AONB is within the county as well as parts of the National Forest and the Peak District national park. Wolverhampton , Walsall , West Bromwich , and Smethwick were historic Staffordshire towns until local government reorganisation created the West Midlands county in 1974
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County Borough
COUNTY BOROUGH is a term introduced in 1889 in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (excluding Scotland ), to refer to a borough or a city independent of county council control. They were abolished by the Local Government Act 1972 in England and Wales , but continue in use for lieutenancy and shrievalty in Northern Ireland . In the Republic of Ireland they remain in existence but have been renamed _cities_ under the provisions of the Local Government Act 2001 . The Local Government (Wales) Act 1994 re-introduced the term for certain "principal areas " in Wales. Scotland did not have county boroughs but instead counties of cities . These were abolished on 16 May 1975. All four Scottish cities of the time — Aberdeen , Dundee , Edinburgh , and Glasgow — were included in this category. There was an additional category of large burgh in the Scottish system, which were responsible for all services apart from police, education and fire
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