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Sake
Sake (Japanese: , Japanese pronunciation: [Sake]), also spelled saké, (IPA: /ˈsɑːk/ SAH-kay or American English /ˈsɑːki/ SAH-kee) also referred to as a Japanese rice wine, is an alcoholic beverage made by fermenting rice that has been polished to remove the bran. Unlike wine, in which alcohol is produced by fermenting sugar that is naturally present in fruit, typically grapes, sake is produced by a brewing process more akin to that of beer, where starch is converted into sugars which ferment into alcohol. The brewing process for sake differs from the process for beer in that, for beer, the conversion from starch to sugar and from sugar to alcohol occurs in two distinct steps. Like other rice wines, when sake is brewed, these conversions occur simultaneously. Furthermore, the alcohol content differs between sake, wine, and beer
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North Gyeongsang Province
North Gyeongsang Province (Korean: 경상북도; RR: Gyeongsangbuk-do; Korean pronunciation: [kjʌŋ.saŋ.buk̚.t͈o]), also known as Gyeongbuk (Korean pronunciation: [kjʌŋ.buk̚]), is a province in eastern South Korea. The province was formed in 1896 from the northern half of the former Gyeongsang province, remained a province of Korea until the country's division in 1945, then became part of South Korea. Daegu was the capital of North Gyeongsang Province between 1896 and 1981, but has not been a part of the province since 1981
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Fermentation (food)
Fermentation in food processing is the process of converting carbohydrates to alcohol or organic acids using microorganismsyeasts or bacteria—under anaerobic conditions. Fermentation usually implies that the action of microorganisms is desired. The science of fermentation is known as zymology or zymurgy. The term fermentation sometimes refers specifically to the chemical conversion of sugars into ethanol, producing alcoholic drinks such as wine, beer, and cider. However, similar processes take place in the leavening of bread (CO2 produced by yeast activity), and in the preservation of sour foods with the production of lactic acid, such as in sauerkraut and yogurt. Other widely consumed fermented foods include vinegar, olives, and cheese
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Amino Acid
Amino acids are organic compounds containing amine (-NH2) and carboxyl (-COOH) functional groups, along with a side chain (R group) specific to each amino acid. The key elements of an amino acid are carbon (C), hydrogen (H), oxygen (O), and nitrogen (N), although other elements are found in the side chains of certain amino acids. About 500 naturally occurring amino acids are known (though only 20 appear in the genetic code) and can be classified in many ways. They can be classified according to the core structural functional groups' locations as alpha- (α-), beta- (β-), gamma- (γ-) or delta- (δ-) amino acids; other categories relate to polarity, pH level, and side chain group type (aliphatic, acyclic, aromatic, containing hydroxyl or sulfur, etc.)
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Brown Rice
Brown rice is whole grain rice, with the inedible outer hull removed; white rice is the same grain with the hull, bran layer and cereal germ removed. Red rice, gold rice, and black rice (sometimes known as purple rice) are all whole rices, but with a differently-pigmented outer layer.
African rice in its inedible husk (seed rice, will sprout)
The same rice, dehusked (whole brown rice) (colour varies by variety)
The same rice, with almost all bran and germ removed to make white rice
Any type of rice may be eaten whole. Whole rice has a mild, nutty flavor, and is chewier. Rice plants accumulate arsenic, and there have been concerns over excessive arsenic levels in rice. There is more arsenic in the bran, so brown rice contains more arsenic
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Japonica Rice
Japonica rice, sometimes called sinica rice, is one of the two major domestic varieties of Asian rice. Japonica rice is extensively cultivated and consumed in Korea, Japan, Taiwan, and northern China, whereas in most other regions Indica rice is the dominant type of rice. Japonica rice grains are rounder, thicker, and harder, compared to longer, thinner, and fluffier Indica rice grains
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Nuruk
Nuruk (누룩) is a traditional Korean fermentation starter. It imparts a unique flavor to Korean food and is used to make different types of Korean alcoholic beverages including takju, cheongju, and
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South Chungcheong Province
South Chungcheong Province (Korean: 충청남도, Chungcheongnam-do, literally "Chungcheong Southern Province"), abbreviated as Chungnam, is a province in the west of South Korea. The province was formed in 1896 from the south-western half of the former Chungcheong Province and remained a province of Korea until the country's division in 1945, thereafter becoming part of South Korea
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Ark Of Taste
The Ark of Taste is an international catalogue of endangered heritage foods which is maintained by the global Slow Food movement. The Ark is designed to preserve at-risk foods that are sustainably produced, unique in taste, and part of a distinct ecoregion. Contrary to the most literal definition of plant and animal conservation, the Ark of Taste aims to maintain edibles in its purview by actively encouraging their cultivation for consumption. By doing so, Slow Food hopes to promote the growing and eating of foods which are sustainable and preserve biodiversity in the human food chain. Foods included in the list are intended to be "culturally or historically linked to a specific region, locality, ethnicity or traditional production practice", in addition to being rare
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