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RISC
A reduced instruction set computer, or RISC (pronounced 'risk', /ɹɪsk/), is one whose instruction set architecture (ISA) allows it to have fewer cycles per instruction (CPI) than a complex instruction set computer (CISC).[1] Various suggestions have been made regarding a precise definition of RISC, but the general concept is that such a computer has a small set of simple and general instructions, rather than a large set of complex and specialized instructions. Another common RISC trait is their load/store architecture,[2] in which memory is accessed through specific instructions rather than as a part of most instructions. Although a number of computers from the 1960s and '70s have been identified as forerunners of RISCs, the modern concept dates to the 1980s
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Tablet Computer
A tablet computer, commonly shortened to tablet, is a portable personal computer, typically with a mobile operating system and LCD touchscreen display processing circuitry, and a rechargeable battery in a single thin, flat package. Tablets, being computers, do what other personal computers do, but lack some I/O
I/O
capabilities that others have. Modern tablets largely resemble modern smartphones, the only differences being that tablets are relatively larger than smartphones, with screens 7 inches (18 cm) or larger, measured diagonally,[1][2][3][4] and may not support access to a cellular network. The touchscreen display is operated by gestures executed by finger or stylus instead of the mouse, trackpad, and keyboard of larger computers. Portable computers can be classified according to the presence and appearance of physical keyboards
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Jack Dongarra
Jack J. Dongarra (born July 18, 1950) is an American University Distinguished Professor of Computer Science
Computer Science
in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Computer Science
Department[10] at the University of Tennessee. He holds the position of a Distinguished Research Staff member in the Computer Science
Computer Science
and Mathematics Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and is an Adjunct Professor in the Computer Science Department at Rice University. Dongarra holds the Turing Fellowship in the schools of Computer Science
Computer Science
and Mathematics at the University of Manchester. He is a Faculty Fellow at Texas A&M University's Institute for Advanced Study [11]
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Laser Printer
Laser printing
Laser printing
is an electrostatic digital printing process. It produces high-quality text and graphics (and moderate-quality photographs) by repeatedly passing a laser beam back and forth over a negatively charged cylinder called a "drum" to define a differentially charged image.[1] The drum then selectively collects electrically charged powdered ink (toner), and transfers the image to paper, which is then heated in order to permanently fuse the text, imagery, or both. As with digital photocopiers, laser printers employ a xerographic printing process. However, laser printing differs from analog photocopiers in that the image is produced by the direct scanning of the medium across the printer's photoreceptor
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Smartphone
A smartphone is a handheld personal computer with a mobile operating system and an integrated mobile broadband cellular network connection for voice, SMS, and Internet
Internet
data communication; most if not all smartphones also support Wi-Fi. Smartphones are typically pocket-sized, as opposed to tablet computers, which are much larger. They are able to run a variety of software components, known as “apps”. Most basic apps (e.g. event calendar, camera, web browser) come pre-installed with the system, while others are available for download from official sources like the Google Play Store
Google Play Store
or Apple App Store. Apps can receive bug fixes and gain additional functionality through software updates; similarly, operating systems are able to update
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Seymour Cray
Seymour Roger Cray (September 28, 1925[1] – October 5, 1996[2]) was an American electrical engineer and supercomputer architect who designed a series of computers that were the fastest in the world for decades, and founded Cray Research
Cray Research
which built many of these machines. Called "the father of supercomputing,"[2] Cray has been credited with creating the supercomputer industry.[3] Joel S
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Michael J. Flynn
Michael J. Flynn
Michael J. Flynn
(born May 20, 1934)[1] is an American professor emeritus at Stanford University.[2]Contents1 Early life and education 2 Career 3 Bibliography 4 References 5 External linksEarly life and education[edit] Flynn was born in New York City. Career[edit] Flynn proposed the Flynn's taxonomy, a method of classifying digital computers, in 1966[3] In the early 1970s, he was the founding chairman of IEEE Computer Society's Technical Committee on Computer Architecture
Computer Architecture
(TCCA)[4] and Association for Computing Machinery's Special Interest Group on Computer Architecture, ACM SIGARCH (initially SICARCH).[5] Flynn encouraged from the beginning, joint cooperation between the two groups[6] which now sponsors many leading joint symposiums and conferences like ACM/IEEE International Symposium on Computer Architecture (ISCA).[7] In 1995 he received a Harry H
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Supercomputer
A supercomputer is a computer with a high level of performance compared to a general-purpose computer. Performance of a supercomputer is measured in floating-point operations per second (FLOPS) instead of million instructions per second (MIPS)
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Android (operating System)
Android is a mobile operating system developed by Google, based on a modified version of the Linux kernel
Linux kernel
and other open source software and designed primarily for touchscreen mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets. In addition, Google
Google
has further developed Android TV
Android TV
for televisions, Android Auto
Android Auto
for cars, and Wear OS
Wear OS
for wrist watches, each with a specialized user interface. Variants of Android are also used on game consoles, digital cameras, PCs and other electronics. Initially developed by Android Inc., which Google
Google
bought in 2005, Android was unveiled in 2007, with the first commercial Android device launched in September 2008. The operating system has since gone through multiple major releases, with the current version being 8.1 "Oreo", released in December 2017
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IPad
iPad (/ˈaɪpæd/ EYE-pad) is a line of tablet computers designed, developed and marketed by Apple Inc., which run the iOS mobile operating system. The first iPad was released on April 3, 2010; the most recent iPad models are the iPad (2018), released on March 27, 2018, the 10.5-inch (270 mm) and 12.9-inch (330 mm) 2G iPad Pro released on June 13, 2017. The user interface is built around the device's multi-touch screen, including a virtual keyboard. All iPads can connect via Wi-Fi; some models also have cellular connectivity. As of January 2015, Apple had sold more than 250 million iPads[6], though sales peaked in 2013[17][18] and it is now the second-most popular kind of tablet computer, by sales, after Android-based types.[19] An iPad can shoot video, take photos, play music, and perform Internet functions such as web-browsing and emailing
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ROMP
Romp or ROMP may refer to:Look up romp in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.ROMP, Research (Office Products Division) Micro Processor Ring opening metathesis polymerization, an olefin polymerization method Romps (1885), a series of tales illustrated by Harry Furniss The Romp (1767), a comedic afterpiece play derived from Love in
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UltraSPARC
The Ultra SPARC
SPARC
is a microprocessor developed by Sun Microsystems
Sun Microsystems
and fabricated by Texas Instruments, introduced in mid-1995. It is the first microprocessor from Sun to implement the 64-bit SPARC
SPARC
V9 instruction set architecture (ISA). Marc Tremblay
Marc Tremblay
was a co-microarchitect.Contents1 Microarchitecture1.1 Functional units 1.2 Cache2 Fabrication 3 Package 4 Related processors 5 ReferencesMicroarchitecture[edit] The Ultra SPARC
SPARC
is a four-issue superscalar microprocessor that executes instructions in in-order
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Router (computing)
A router[a] is a networking device that forwards data packets between computer networks. Routers perform the traffic directing functions on the Internet. A data packet is typically forwarded from one router to another router through the networks that constitute an internetwork until it reaches its destination node.[2] A router is connected to two or more data lines from different networks.[b] When a data packet comes in on one of the lines, the router reads the network address information in the packet to determine the ultimate destination. Then, using information in its routing table or routing policy, it directs the packet to the next network on its journey. The most familiar type of routers are home and small office routers that simply forward IP packets between the home computers and the Internet
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IBM
IBM
IBM
(International Business
Business
Machines Corporation) is an American multinational technology company headquartered in Armonk, New York, United States, with operations in over 170 countries. The company originated in 1911 as the Computing-Tabulating-Recording Company
Computing-Tabulating-Recording Company
(CTR) and was renamed "International Business
Business
Machines" in 1924. IBM
IBM
manufactures and markets computer hardware, middleware and software, and provides hosting and consulting services in areas ranging from mainframe computers to nanotechnology. IBM
IBM
is also a major research organization, holding the record for most U.S
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IBM RT-PC
The IBM
IBM
RT (or IBM
IBM
6150 series) was a workstation sold by IBM
IBM
and built around IBM's ROMP processor, a spin-off of the IBM
IBM
801 pioneered at IBM
IBM
Research. The system was introduced in 1986 as the RT PC (RISC Technology Personal Computer) and ran AIX 1.x and 2.x, the Academic Operating System (AOS), or the Pick operating system. It was commonly, but incorrectly, known as the PC RT, and IBM
IBM
later simplified the name. It didn't enjoy much success, and all models were discontinued by May 1991
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University Of California, Berkeley
Urban Total 1,232 acres (499 ha) Core Campus 178 acres (72 ha)[5] Total land owned 6,679 acres (2,703 ha)[6]Colors Berkeley Blue, California
California
Gold[7]          Athletics NCAA Division I
NCAA Division I
FBS – Pac-12Nickname Golden BearsSporting affiliationsAm. East MPSFMascot Oski the BearWebsite www.berkeley.eduThe University of California, Berkeley
University of California, Berkeley
(UC Berkeley, Berkeley, Cal, or California[8][9]) is a public research university in Berkeley, California.[9] Founded in 1868, Berkeley is the flagship institution of the ten research universities affiliated with the University of California
California
system
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