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Heroism
A hero (masculine) or heroine (feminine) is a person or main character of a literary work who, in the face of danger, combats adversity through feats of ingenuity, bravery or strength, often sacrificing their own personal concerns for a greater good. The concept of the hero can be found in classical literature. It is the main or revered character in heroic epic poetry celebrated through ancient legends of a people, often striving for military conquest and living by a continually flawed personal honor code.[1] The definition of a hero has changed throughout time
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Hero (other)
A hero is a person who performs extraordinary deeds for the benefit of others. Hero
Hero
may also refer to:Contents1 People 2 Ancient religion 3 Arts and entertainment3.1 Comics 3.2 Gaming 3.3 Literature 3.4 Film 3.5 Music3.5.1 Albums 3.5.2 Opera and musicals 3.5.3 Songs3.6 Publications 3.7 Television4 Government 5 Manufacturing companies 6 Sports and racing 7 Technology 8 Transportation 9 Other uses 10 See alsoPeople[edit] Hero
Hero
of Alexandria (c. 10–70 AD), ancient Greek mathematician Hero
Hero
the Younger (fl. 938), Byzantine land surveyor Agent Hero, codename for Soviet double agent Oleg Penkovsky (1919–1963) Hero, stage name of Justin Cassell (fl
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Homer
Homer
Homer
(/ˈhoʊmər/; Greek: Ὅμηρος [hómɛːros], Hómēros) is the name ascribed by the ancient Greeks to the legendary author of the Iliad
Iliad
and the Odyssey, two epic poems which are the central works of ancient Greek literature. The Iliad
Iliad
is set during the Trojan War, the ten-year siege of the city of Troy
Troy
by a coalition of Greek kingdoms. It focuses on a quarrel between King Agamemnon
Agamemnon
and the warrior Achilles
Achilles
lasting a few weeks during the last year of the war. The Odyssey
Odyssey
focuses on the journey home of Odysseus, king of Ithaca, after the fall of Troy. Many accounts of Homer's life circulated in classical antiquity, the most widespread being that he was a blind bard from Ionia, a region of central coastal Anatolia
Anatolia
in present-day Turkey
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Linear B
Linear B
Linear B
is a syllabic script that was used for writing Mycenaean Greek, the earliest attested form of Greek. The script predates the Greek alphabet
Greek alphabet
by several centuries. The oldest Mycenaean writing dates to about 1450 BC.[1] It is descended from the older Linear A, an undeciphered earlier script used for writing the Minoan language, as is the later Cypriot syllabary, which also recorded Greek. Linear B, found mainly in the palace archives at Knossos, Cydonia,[2] Pylos, Thebes and Mycenae,[3] disappeared with the fall of Mycenaean civilization during the Late Bronze Age
Late Bronze Age
collapse. The succeeding period, known as the Greek Dark Ages, provides no evidence of the use of writing
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Robert S. P. Beekes
Robert Stephen Paul Beekes (Dutch: [ˈbeːkəs]; 2 September 1937 – 21 September 2017)[1] was Emeritus Professor of Comparative Indo-European Linguistics at Leiden University
Leiden University
and the author of many monographs on the Proto-Indo-European language.Contents1 Scholarly work 2 Publications (selection)2.1 Monographs 2.2 Edited volumes 2.3 Articles3 ReferencesScholarly work[edit] One of his most well-known books is Comparative Indo-European Linguistics: An Introduction, a standard handbook on Proto-Indo-European that treats the area of linguistic reconstruction thoroughly but also features cultural reconstruction and comparative linguistic methods in general. Beekes was also a co-author, with L. Bouke van der Meer, of De Etrusken spreken (1991)
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Pre-Greek
The Pre-Greek substrate (or Pre-Greek substratum) consists of the unknown language or languages spoken in prehistoric ancient Greece before the settlement of Proto-Hellenic
Proto-Hellenic
speakers in the area. It is possible that Greek took over some thousand words and proper names from such a language (or languages), because some of its vocabulary cannot be satisfactorily explained as deriving from the Proto-Greek language.[1]Contents1 Pre-Greek loanwords 2 Substratum theories2.1 Minoan substratum 2.2 Anatolian Indo-European substratum 2.3 Tyrrhenian substratum3 See also3.1 Substrates of other Indo-European languages4 References 5 Sources 6 Further reading 7 External linksPre-Greek loanwords[edit] There are different categories of Pre-Greek, or "Aegean", loanwords such as:[2]Animals: e.g
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Hera
Hera
Hera
(/ˈhɛrə, ˈhɪərə/; Greek: Ἥρᾱ, Hērā; Ἥρη, Hērē in Ionic and Homeric Greek) is the goddess of women, marriage, family, and childbirth in Ancient Greek religion
Ancient Greek religion
and myth, one of the Twelve Olympians and the sister-wife of Zeus. She is the daughter of the Titans Cronus
Cronus
and Rhea. Hera
Hera
rules over Mount Olympus
Mount Olympus
as queen of the gods. A matronly figure, Hera
Hera
served as both the patroness and protectress of married women, presiding over weddings and blessing marital unions. One of Hera's defining characteristics is her jealous and vengeful nature against Zeus' numerous lovers and illegitimate offspring, as well as the mortals who cross her. Hera
Hera
is commonly seen with the animals she considers sacred including the cow, lion and the peacock
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Gender Neutrality In English
Gender-neutral language
Gender-neutral language
is language that minimizes assumptions about the social gender or biological sex of people referred to in speech or writing.Contents1 Debate1.1 Arguments for 1.2 Arguments against 1.3 In religion 1.4 Naming practices2 Problems and their resolution2.1 Job titles 2.2 Generic words for humans 2.3 Pronouns 2.4 Honorifics3 Style guidance by publishers and others 4 See also 5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksDebate[edit] Proponents of gender-neutral language argue that making language less biased is not only laudable, but achievable. Many people find non-neutral language to be offensive.[1][There is] a growing awareness that language does not merely reflect the way we think: it also shapes our thinking. If words and expressions that imply that women or men are inferior are constantly used, that assumption of inferiority tends to become part of our mindset ..
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Greek Hero Cult
Hero
Hero
cults were one of the most distinctive features of ancient Greek religion. In Homeric Greek, "hero" (ἥρως, hḗrōs) refers to a man who was fighting on either side during the Trojan War. By the historical period, however, the word came to mean specifically a dead man, venerated and propitiated at his tomb or at a designated shrine, because his fame during life or unusual manner of death gave him power to support and protect the living
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Hector
In Greek mythology
Greek mythology
and Roman mythology, Hector
Hector
(/ˈhɛktər/; Ἕκτωρ Hektōr, pronounced [héktɔːr]) was a Trojan prince and the greatest fighter for Troy
Troy
in the Trojan War. As the first-born son of King Priam
Priam
and Queen Hecuba, who was a descendant of Dardanus and Tros, the founder of Troy,[1] he was a prince of the royal house and the heir apparent to his father's throne. He was married to Andromache, with whom he had an infant son, Scamandrius (whom the people of Troy
Troy
called Astyanax)
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Twelve Olympians
In ancient Greek religion and mythology, the twelve Olympians are the major deities of the Greek pantheon, commonly considered to be Zeus, Hera, Poseidon, Demeter, Athena, Apollo, Artemis, Ares, Aphrodite, Hephaestus, Hermes, and either Hestia
Hestia
or Dionysus.[2] They were called 'Olympians' because they were considered to reside on Mount Olympus. Although Hades
Hades
was a major ancient Greek god, and was the brother of the first generation of Olympians (Zeus, Poseidon, Hera, Demeter, and Hestia), he resided in the underworld, far from Olympus, and thus was not usually considered to be one of the Olympians. Besides the twelve Olympians, there were many other cultic groupings of twelve gods.Contents1 Olympians 2 Twelve gods 3 List 4 Genealogy 5 See also 6 Notes 7 ReferencesOlympians[edit] The Olympians were the principal deities of the Greek pantheon, so named because of their residency atop Mount Olympus
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Troy
Troy
Troy
(Ancient Greek: Τροία, Troia or Τροίας, Troias and Ἴλιον, Ilion or Ἴλιος, Ilios; Latin: Troia and Ilium;[note 1] Hittite: Wilusha or Truwisha;[1][2] Turkish: Truva or Troya) was a city situated in the far northwest of the region known in late Classical antiquity
Classical antiquity
as Asia Minor, now known as Anatolia
Anatolia
in modern Turkey, near (just south of) the southwest mouth of the Dardanelles strait and northwest of Mount Ida. The present-day location is known as Hisarlik. It was the setting of the Trojan War
Trojan War
described in the Greek Epic Cycle, in particular in the Iliad, one of the two epic poems attributed to Homer
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Trojan War
Setting: Troy
Troy
(modern Hisarlik, Turkey) Period: Bronze Age Traditional dating: c. 1194–1184 BC Modern dating: c
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The Iliad
Setting: Troy
Troy
(modern Hisarlik, Turkey) Period: Bronze Age Traditional dating: c. 1194–1184 BC Modern dating: c
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Batman
Batman
Batman
is a fictional superhero appearing in American comic books published by DC Comics. The character was created by artist Bob Kane and writer Bill Finger,[4][5] and first appeared in Detective Comics #27 (1939). Originally named the "Bat-Man", the character is also referred to by such epithets as the Caped Crusader, the Dark Knight, and the World's Greatest Detective.[6] Batman's secret identity is Bruce Wayne, a wealthy American playboy, philanthropist, and owner of Wayne Enterprises. After witnessing the murder of his parents Dr. Thomas Wayne
Thomas Wayne
and Martha Wayne
Martha Wayne
as a child, he swore vengeance against criminals, an oath tempered by a sense of justice
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Athena
Athena[Notes 2] or Athene,[Notes 3] often given the epithet Pallas,[Notes 4] is the ancient Greek goddess of wisdom, handicraft, and warfare,[1] who was later syncretized with the Roman goddess Minerva.[2] Athena
Athena
was regarded as the patron and protectress of various cities across Greece, particularly the city of Athens, from which she most likely received her name.[3] She is usually shown in art wearing a helmet and holding a spear. Her major symbols include owls, olive trees, snakes, and the Gorgoneion. From her origin as an Aegean palace goddess, Athena
Athena
was closely associated with the city. She was known as Polias and Poliouchos (both derived from polis, meaning "city-state"), and her temples were usually located atop the fortified Acropolis
Acropolis
in the central part of the city
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