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Fukuoka
Fukuoka
Fukuoka
(福岡市, Fukuoka-shi, Japanese: [ɸɯ̥kɯꜜoka]) is the capital city of Fukuoka
Fukuoka
Prefecture, situated on the northern shore of Japanese island Kyushu. It is the most populous city on the island, followed by Kitakyushu. It is the largest city and metropolitan area west of Keihanshin. The city was designated on April 1, 1972, by government ordinance. Greater Fukuoka, with a population of 2.5 million people (2005 census), is part of the heavily industrialized Fukuoka– Kitakyushu
Kitakyushu
zone as well as Northern Kyushu. As of 2015[update], Fukuoka
Fukuoka
is Japan’s sixth largest city, having passed the population of Kobe.[1] As of July 2011[update], Fukuoka
Fukuoka
passed the population of Kyoto
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Mongolia
Mongolia
Mongolia
/mɒŋˈɡoʊliə/ ( listen) (Monggol Ulus in Mongolian; Монгол Улс in Mongolian Cyrillic) is a landlocked unitary sovereign state in East Asia. Its area is roughly equivalent with the historical territory of Outer Mongolia, and that term is sometimes used to refer to the current state. It is sandwiched between China
China
to the south and Russia
Russia
to the north. Mongolia
Mongolia
does not share a border with Kazakhstan, although only 37 kilometres (23 mi) separates them. At 1,564,116 square kilometres (603,909 sq mi), Mongolia
Mongolia
is the 18th largest and the most sparsely populated fully sovereign country in the world, with a population of around 3 million people
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Time Zone
A time zone is a region of the globe that observes a uniform standard time for legal, commercial, and social purposes. Time
Time
zones tend to follow the boundaries of countries and their subdivisions because it is convenient for areas in close commercial or other communication to keep the same time. Most of the time zones on land are offset from Coordinated Universal Time
Time
(UTC) by a whole number of hours (UTC−12:00 to UTC+14:00), but a few zones are offset by 30 or 45 minutes (e.g. Newfoundland
Newfoundland
Standard Time
Time
is UTC−03:30, Nepal
Nepal
Standard Time
Time
is UTC+05:45, and Indian Standard Time
Time
is UTC+05:30). Some higher latitude and temperate zone countries use daylight saving time for part of the year, typically by adjusting local clock time by an hour
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Kamakura Shogunate
The Kamakura
Kamakura
shogunate (Japanese: 鎌倉幕府, Kamakura
Kamakura
bakufu) was a Japanese feudal military government[1] that ruled from 1185 to 1333. The heads of the government were the shōguns.[2] The first three were members of the Minamoto clan.[3] The next two were members of the Fujiwara clan.[4] The last six were minor Imperial princes.[1] These years are known as the Kamakura
Kamakura
period
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Suzerainty
Suzerainty (/ˈsjuːzərənti/, /ˈsjuːzərɛnti/ and /ˈsjuːzrənti/) is a back-formation from the late 18th-century word suzerain, meaning upper-sovereign, derived from the French sus (meaning above) + -erain (from souverain, meaning sovereign). It was first used to refer to the dominant position of the Ottoman Empire in relation to its surrounding regions; the Ottoman Empire being the suzerain, and the relationship being suzerainty
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Mongol Empire
The Mongol
Mongol
Empire
Empire
(Mongolian: Mongolyn Ezent Güren  listen (help·info); Mongolian Cyrillic: Монголын эзэнт гүрэн; [mɔŋɡ(ɔ)ɮˈiːŋ ɛt͡sˈɛnt ˈɡurəŋ]; also Орда ("Horde") in Russian c
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Kublai Khan
Kublai
Kublai
(/ˈkuːblaɪ/; Mongolian: Хубилай, Hubilai) was the fifth Khagan
Khagan
(Great Khan) of the Mongol Empire
Mongol Empire
(Ikh Mongol Uls), reigning from 1260 to 1294 (although due to the division of the empire this was a nominal position). He also founded the Yuan dynasty
Yuan dynasty
in China
China
as a conquest dynasty in 1271, and ruled as the first Yuan emperor until his death in 1294. Kublai
Kublai
was the fourth son of Tolui
Tolui
(his second son with Sorghaghtani Beki) and a grandson of Genghis Khan. He succeeded his older brother Möngke as Khagan
Khagan
in 1260, but had to defeat his younger brother Ariq Böke in the Toluid Civil War
Toluid Civil War
lasting until 1264
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Kojiki
Kojiki
Kojiki
(古事記, "Records of Ancient Matters" or "An Account of Ancient Matters"), also sometimes read as Furukotofumi,[1] is the oldest extant chronicle in Japan, dating from the early 8th century (711–712) and composed by Ō no Yasumaro
Ō no Yasumaro
at the request of Empress Genmei.[2] The Kojiki
Kojiki
is a collection of myths concerning the origin of the Japanese archipelago, and the Kami
Kami
(神). The myths contained in the Kojiki
Kojiki
as well as the Nihon Shoki
Nihon Shoki
(日本書紀) are part of the inspiration behind many practices
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Kofun
Kofun
Kofun
(古墳, from Sino-Japanese "ancient grave") are megalithic tombs or tumuli in Japan, constructed between the early 3rd century and the early 7th century AD. The term Kofun
Kofun
is the origin of the name of the Kofun
Kofun
period, which indicates the middle 3rd century to early-middle 6th century. Many Kofun
Kofun
have distinctive keyhole-shaped mounds (zenpō-kōen fun (前方後円墳)), which are unique to ancient Japan
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Old Stone Age
The Paleolithic
Paleolithic
or Palaeolithic /ˌpæliːəˈlɪθɪk/ is a period in human prehistory distinguished by the original development of stone tools that covers c. 95% of human technological prehistory.[1] It extends from the earliest known use of stone tools by hominins c. 3.3 million years ago, to the end of the Pleistocene
Pleistocene
c. 11,650 cal BP.[2] The Paleolithic
Paleolithic
is followed in Europe by the Mesolithic, although the date of the transition varies geographically by several thousand years. During the Paleolithic, hominins grouped together in small societies such as bands, and subsisted by gathering plants and fishing, hunting or scavenging wild animals.[3] The Paleolithic
Paleolithic
is characterized by the use of knapped stone tools, although at the time humans also used wood and bone tools
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Yamato Province
Yamato Province
Yamato Province
(大和国, Yamato no Kuni) was a province of Japan, located in Kinai, corresponding to present-day Nara Prefecture
Nara Prefecture
in Honshū.[1] It was also called Washū (和州). At first, the name was written with one different character (大倭; cf. Names of Japan), and for about ten years after 737, this was revised to use more desirable characters (大養徳). The final revision was made in the second year of the Tenpyō-hōji
Tenpyō-hōji
era (c. 758). It is classified as a great province in the Engishiki. The Yamato Period
Yamato Period
in the history of Japan
Japan
refers to the late Kofun Period (c. 250–538) and Asuka Period
Asuka Period
(538–710)
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Romanization Of Japanese
The romanization of Japanese is the use of Latin script
Latin script
to write the Japanese language.[1] This method of writing is sometimes referred to in English as rōmaji (ローマ字, literally, "Roman letters") ([ɾoːmaꜜʑi] ( listen). There are several different romanization systems. The three main ones are Hepburn romanization, Kunrei-shiki romanization (ISO 3602), and Nihon-shiki romanization ( ISO 3602 Strict). Variants of the Hepburn system are the most widely used. Japanese is normally written in a combination of logographic characters borrowed from Chinese (kanji) and syllabic scripts (kana) that also ultimately derive from Chinese characters. Rōmaji may be used in any context where Japanese text is targeted at non-Japanese speakers who cannot read kanji or kana, such as for names on street signs and passports, and in dictionaries and textbooks for foreign learners of the language
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Black-headed Gull
Larus
Larus
ridibundusThe black-headed gull ( Chroicocephalus
Chroicocephalus
ridibundus) is a small gull that breeds in much of Europe
Europe
and Asia, and also in coastal eastern Canada. Most of the population is migratory and winters further south, but some birds reside in the milder westernmost areas of Europe. Some black-headed gulls also spend the winter in northeastern North America, where it was formerly known as the common black-headed gull. As is the case with many gulls, it was previously placed in the genus Larus. The genus name Chroicocephalus
Chroicocephalus
is from Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
khroizo, "to colour", and kephale, "head"
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Camellia
About 100–250, see textSynonymsThea Camellia
Camellia
is a genus of flowering plants in the family Theaceae. They are found in eastern and southern Asia, from the Himalayas east to Japan
Japan
and Indonesia. There are 100–300 described species, with some controversy over the exact number. There are also around 3,000 hybrids. The genus was named by Linnaeus after the Jesuit
Jesuit
botanist Georg Joseph Kamel, who worked in the Philippines and described a species of camellia (although Linnaeus did not refer to Kamel's account when discussing the genus).[1] Camellias are famous throughout East Asia; they are known as cháhuā (茶花, 'tea flower') in Chinese, tsubaki (椿) in Japanese, dongbaek-kkot (동백꽃) in Korean, and as hoa trà or hoa chè in Vietnamese. Of economic importance in East Asia, Southeast Asia, and the Indian subcontinent, leaves of C
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Camphor Laurel
Cinnamomum
Cinnamomum
camphora (commonly known as camphor tree, camphorwood or camphor laurel) is a large evergreen tree that grows up to 20–30 m (66–98 ft) tall.[1] The leaves have a glossy, waxy appearance and smell of camphor when crushed. In spring, it produces bright green foliage with masses of small white flowers. It produces clusters of black, berry-like fruit around 1 cm (0.39 in) in diameter
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UTC+9
UTC+09:00 is an identifier for a time offset from UTC
UTC
of +09. During the Japanese occupations of Borneo, Burma, Hong Kong, Dutch East Indies, Malaya, Philippines, Singapore, and French Indochina, it was used as a common time with Tokyo <
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