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Artisanal Rum distillery along the N7 road

Most rum is produced from molasses, which is made from sugarcane. A rum's quality is dependent on the quality and variety of the sugar cane that was used to create it. The sugar cane's quality depends on the soil type and climate that it was grown in. Within the Caribbean, much of this molasses is from Brazil.[27] A notable exception is the French-speaking islands, where sugarcane juice is the preferred base ingredient.[2] In Brazil itself, the distilled alcoholic drink derived from cane juice is distinguished from rum and called cachaça.

Yeast and water are added to the base ingredient to start the fermentation process. While some rum producers allow wild yeasts to perform the fermentation, most use specific strains of yeast to help provide a consistent taste and predictable fermentation time.[49] Dunder, the yeast-rich foam from previous fermentations, is the traditional yeast source in Jamaica.[50] "The yeast employed will determine the final taste and aroma profile," says Jamaican master blender Joy Spence.[2] Distillers that make lighter rums, such as Bacardi, prefer to use faster-working yeasts.[2] Use of slower-working yeasts causes more esters to accumulate during fermentation, allowing for a fuller-tasting rum.[27] A notable exception is the French-speaking islands, where sugarcane juice is the preferred base ingredient.[2] In Brazil itself, the distilled alcoholic drink derived from cane juice is distinguished from rum and called cachaça.

Yeast and water are added to the base ingredient to start the fermentation process. While some rum producers allow wild yeasts to perform the fermentation, most use specific strains of yeast to help provide a consistent taste and predictable fermentation time.[49] Dunder, the yeast-rich foam from previous fermentations, is the traditional yeast source in Jamaica.[50] "The yeast employed will determine the final taste and aroma profile," says Jamaican master blender Joy Spence.[2] Distillers that make lighter rums, such as Bacardi, prefer to use faster-working yeasts.[2] Use of slower-working yeasts causes more esters to accumulate during fermentation, allowing for a fuller-tasting rum.[49]

Fermentation products like 2-ethyl-3-methyl butyric acid and esters like ethyl butyrate and ethyl hexanoate give rise to the sweet and fruitiness of rum.[51]

Distillation

As with all other aspects of rum production, no standard method is used for distillation. While some prod

Yeast and water are added to the base ingredient to start the fermentation process. While some rum producers allow wild yeasts to perform the fermentation, most use specific strains of yeast to help provide a consistent taste and predictable fermentation time.[49] Dunder, the yeast-rich foam from previous fermentations, is the traditional yeast source in Jamaica.[50] "The yeast employed will determine the final taste and aroma profile," says Jamaican master blender Joy Spence.[2] Distillers that make lighter rums, such as Bacardi, prefer to use faster-working yeasts.[2] Use of slower-working yeasts causes more esters to accumulate during fermentation, allowing for a fuller-tasting rum.[49]

Fermentation products like 2-ethyl-3-methyl butyric acid and esters like ethyl butyrate and ethyl hexanoate give rise to the sweet and fruitiness of rum.[51]

As with all other aspects of rum production, no standard method is used for distillation. While some producers work in batches using pot stills, most rum production is done using column still distillation.[49] Pot still output contains more congeners than the output from column stills, so produces fuller-tasting rums.[2]

Ageing and blending