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Rajasthan
Rajasthan
(/ˈrɑːdʒəstæn/ Hindustani pronunciation: [raːdʒəsˈt̪ʰaːn] ( listen); literally, "Land of Kings")[4] is India's largest state by area (342,239 square kilometres (132,139 sq mi) or 10.4% of India's total area). It is located on the north western side of the India, where it comprises most of the wide and inhospitable Thar Desert (also known as the " Rajasthan
Rajasthan
Desert" and "Great Indian Desert") and shares a border with the Pakistani provinces of Punjab to the northwest and Sindh
Sindh
to the west, along the Sutlej- Indus
Indus
river valley. Elsewhere it is bordered by five[5] other Indian states: Punjab to the north; Haryana
Haryana
and Uttar Pradesh
Uttar Pradesh
to the northeast; Madhya Pradesh
Madhya Pradesh
to the southeast; and Gujarat
Gujarat
to the southwest. Major features include the ruins of the Indus
Indus
Valley Civilisation at Kalibanga; the Dilwara Temples, a Jain
Jain
pilgrimage site at Rajasthan's only hill station, Mount Abu, in the ancient Aravalli mountain range; and, in eastern Rajasthan, the Keoladeo National Park
Keoladeo National Park
near Bharatpur, a World Heritage Site[6] known for its bird life. Rajasthan
Rajasthan
is also home to three national tiger reserves, the Ranthambore National Park in Sawai Madhopur, Sariska Tiger
Tiger
Reserve in Alwar
Alwar
and Mukundra Hill Tiger
Tiger
Reserve in Kota. The state was formed on 30 March 1949 when Rajputana – the name adopted by the British Raj
British Raj
for its dependencies in the region[7] – was merged into the Dominion of India. Its capital and largest city is Jaipur. Other important cities are Jodhpur, Kota, Bikaner, Ajmer
Ajmer
and Udaipur.

Contents

1 Etymology 2 History

2.1 Ancient 2.2 Classical

2.2.1 Gurjars 2.2.2 Gurjara-Pratihara

2.3 Medieval and Early Modern

2.3.1 Historical tribes 2.3.2 Major rulers 2.3.3 Rajput
Rajput
martial history

2.4 Modern

3 Geography 4 Flora and fauna

4.1 Wildlife
Wildlife
protection

5 Communication

5.1 Email in Hindi

6 Government and politics 7 Administrative divisions 8 Economy

8.1 Agricultural production

9 Transport 10 Demographics

10.1 Language

11 Culture 12 Education

12.1 Literacy 12.2 Schools 12.3 Higher education

13 Tourism 14 See also 15 References 16 Further reading 17 External links

Etymology[edit] The first mention of the name "Rajasthan" appears in the 1829 publication Annals and Antiquities of Rajast'han or the Central and Western Rajpoot States of India, while the earliest known record of "Rajputana" as a name for the region is in George Thomas's 1800 memoir Military Memories.[8] John Keay, in his book India: A History, stated that "Rajputana" was coined by the British in 1829, John Briggs, translating Ferishta's history of early Islamic India, used the phrase "Rajpoot (Rajput) princes" rather than "Indian princes".[9] History[edit] Main article: History of Rajasthan Main article: List of battles of Rajasthan Ancient[edit] Parts of what is now Rajasthan
Rajasthan
were partly part of the Vedic Civilisation and Indus
Indus
Valley Civilization. Kalibangan, in Hanumangarh district, was a major provincial capital of the Indus
Indus
Valley Civilization.[10] Matsya Kingdom
Matsya Kingdom
of the Vedic civilisation
Vedic civilisation
of India, is said to roughly corresponded to the former state of Jaipur
Jaipur
in Rajasthan
Rajasthan
and included the whole of Alwar
Alwar
with portions of Bharatpur.[11][12] The capital of Matsya was at Viratanagar (modern Bairat), which is said to have been named after its founder king Virata.[13] Bhargava[14] identifies the two districts of Jhunjhunu
Jhunjhunu
and Sikar
Sikar
and parts of Jaipur
Jaipur
district along with Haryana
Haryana
districts of Mahendragarh and Rewari
Rewari
as part of Vedic state of Brahmavarta. Bhargava also locates the present day Sahibi River
Sahibi River
as the Vedic Drishadwati
Drishadwati
River, which along with Saraswati River
Saraswati River
formed the borders of the Vedic state of Brahmavarta.[15] Manu and Bhrigu
Bhrigu
narrated the Manusmriti
Manusmriti
to a congregation of seers in this area only. Ashrams of Vedic seers Bhrigu and his son Chayvan Rishi, for whom Chyawanprash was formulated, were near Dhosi Hill
Dhosi Hill
part of which lies in Dhosi village of Jhunjhunu district of Rajasthan
Rajasthan
and part lies in Mahendragarh
Mahendragarh
district of Haryana. The Western Kshatrapas
Western Kshatrapas
(405–35 BC), the Saka
Saka
rulers of the western part of India, were successors to the Indo-Scythians, and were contemporaneous with the Kushans, who ruled the northern part of the Indian subcontinent. The Indo-Scythians
Indo-Scythians
invaded the area of Ujjain
Ujjain
and established the Saka
Saka
era (with their calendar), marking the beginning of the long-lived Saka
Saka
Western Satraps
Western Satraps
state.[16] Classical[edit] Gurjars[edit] Gurjars
Gurjars
ruled for many dynasties in this part of the country, the region was known as Gurjaratra.[17] Up to the tenth century almost the whole of North India, acknowledged the supremacy of the Gurjars
Gurjars
with their seat of power at Kannauj.[18] Gurjara-Pratihara[edit] The Gurjar Pratihar Empire acted as a barrier for Arab
Arab
invaders from the 8th to the 11th century. The chief accomplishment of the Gurjara Pratihara empire lies in its successful resistance to foreign invasions from the west, starting in the days of Junaid. Historian R. C. Majumdar says that this was openly acknowledged by the Arab writers. He further notes that historians of India
India
have wondered at the slow progress of Muslim
Muslim
invaders in India, as compared with their rapid advance in other parts of the world. Now there seems little doubt that it was the power of the Gurjara Pratihara army that effectively barred the progress of the Arabs beyond the confines of Sindh, their first conquest for nearly 300 years.[19] Medieval and Early Modern[edit] Historical tribes[edit] Traditionally the Rajputs, Gurjars, Jats, Meenas, Bhils, Rajpurohit, Charans, Yadavs, Bishnois, Meghwal, Sermals, PhulMali (Saini) and other tribes made a great contribution in building the state of Rajasthan. All these tribes suffered great difficulties in protecting their culture and the land. Millions of them were killed trying to protect their land. A number of Gurjars
Gurjars
had been exterminated in Bhinmal
Bhinmal
and Ajmer
Ajmer
areas fighting with the invaders. Bhils once ruled Kota. Meenas
Meenas
were rulers of Bundi, Hadoti
Hadoti
and the Dhundhar
Dhundhar
region.[13]

Meenas

The powerful Meenas
Meenas
ruled over Dhundhar
Dhundhar
region, Hadoti
Hadoti
and many other places in Rajasthan
Rajasthan
until 12th century.[20] Major rulers[edit]

A portrait of Hem Chandra Vikramaditya
Hem Chandra Vikramaditya
from the 1910s.

Hemu, the Hindu Emperor, was born in the village of Machheri in Alwar District in 1501. He won 22 battles against Afghans, from Punjab to Bengal
Bengal
including states of Ajmer
Ajmer
and Alwar
Alwar
in Rajasthan, and defeated Akbar's forces twice at Agra
Agra
and Delhi
Delhi
in 1556 at Battle of Delhi[21] before acceding to the throne of Delhi
Delhi
and establishing the "Hindu Raj" in North India, albeit for a short duration, from Purana Quila
Purana Quila
in Delhi. Hem Chandra was killed in the battlefield at Second Battle of Panipat fighting against Mughals
Mughals
on 5 November 1556.

Maharana Pratap
Maharana Pratap
Singh, legendary sixteenth-century Rajput
Rajput
ruler of Mewar.

Maharana Pratap
Maharana Pratap
of Mewar
Mewar
resisted Akbar
Akbar
in the famous Battle of Haldighati (1576) and later operated from hilly areas of his kingdom. The Bhils were Maharana's main allies during these wars. Most of these attacks were repulsed even though the Mughal forces outnumbered Mewar Rajputs
Rajputs
in all the wars fought between them. The Haldighati war was fought between 10,000 Mewaris and a 100,000-strong Mughal force (including many Rajputs
Rajputs
like Kachwahas from Dhundhar). Jat
Jat
king Maharaja Suraj Mal
Suraj Mal
(February 1707 – 25 December 1765) or Sujan Singh was ruler of Bharatpur in Rajasthan. A contemporary historian has described him as "the Plato
Plato
of the Jat
Jat
people" and by a modern writer as the " Jat
Jat
Odysseus", because of his political sagacity, steady intellect, and clear vision.[22]

Rajput
Rajput
martial history[edit] Rajput
Rajput
families rose to prominence in the 6th century CE. The Rajputs put up a valiant resistance to the Islamic invasions and protected the Indian subcontinent
Indian subcontinent
with their warfare and chivalry for more than 700 years. Later, the Turks, Afghans and Persians through skilled warfare, were able to get a firm grip on northern India, including parts of Rajasthan. The Rana's of Mewar
Mewar
led other kingdoms in its resistance to outside rule. Rana Hammir Singh, defeated the Tughlaq dynasty
Tughlaq dynasty
and recovered a large portion of Rajasthan. The indomitable Rana Kumbha defeated the Sultans of Malwa and Gujarat
Gujarat
and made Mewar
Mewar
the most powerful Rajput
Rajput
Kingdom in India. The ambitious Rana Sanga
Rana Sanga
united the various Rajput
Rajput
clans and fought against the foreign powers in India. Rana Sanga
Rana Sanga
defeated the Afghan Lodi Empire
Lodi Empire
of Delhi
Delhi
and crushed the Turkic Sultanates of Malwa and Gujarat. Rana Sanga
Rana Sanga
then tried to create an Indian empire but was defeated by the first Mughal Emperor Babur
Babur
at Khanua. The defeat was due to betrayal by the Tomar king Silhadi of Raisen. After Rana Sangas death there was no one who could check the rapid expansion of the Mughal Empire.[23] During Akbars reign most of the Rajput
Rajput
kings accepted Mughal Suzerainty, but the rulers of Mewar
Mewar
(Rana Udai Singh II) and Marwar (Rao Chandrasen Rathore) refused to have any form of alliance with the Mughals. To teach the Rajputs
Rajputs
a lesson Akbar
Akbar
massacred the citizens of Rajasthan
Rajasthan
in large numbers. Akbar
Akbar
killed 30,000 unarmed citizens in Chittor
Chittor
alone.[24] Maharana Pratap
Maharana Pratap
took an oath to avenge the citizens of Chittor, he fought the Mughal empire till his death and liberated most of Mewar apart from Chittor
Chittor
itself. Maharana Pratap
Maharana Pratap
soon became the most celebrated warrior of Rajasthan
Rajasthan
and became famous all over India
India
for his sporadic warfare and noble actions. According to Satish Chandra, "Rana Pratap's defiance of the mighty Mughal empire, almost alone and unaided by the other Rajput
Rajput
states, constitutes a glorious saga of Rajput
Rajput
valour and the spirit of self sacrifice for cherished principles. Rana Pratap's methods of sporadic warfare was later elaborated further by Malik Ambar, the Deccani general, and by Shivaji".[25] Rana Amar Singh I
Amar Singh I
continued his ancestors war against the Mughal's under Jehangir, he repelled the Mughal armies at Dewar. Later an expedition was again sent under leadership of Prince Khurram, which caused much damage to life and property of Mewar.[26] Many temples were destroyed, several villages were put on fire and ladies and children were captured and tortured to make Amar Singh accept surrender.[26] During Aurangzebs rule Rana Raj Singh I
Raj Singh I
and Veer Durgadas Rathore
Durgadas Rathore
were chief among those who defied the intolerant emperor of Delhi. They took advantage of the Aravalli hills and caused heavy damage on the Mughal armies that were trying to occupy Rajasthan.[27][28] After Aurangzebs death Bahadur Shah I
Bahadur Shah I
tried to subjugate Rajasthan like his ancestors but his plan backfired when the three Rajput
Rajput
Raja's of Amber, Udaipur
Udaipur
and Jodhpur
Jodhpur
made a joint resistance to the Mughals. The Rajputs
Rajputs
first expelled the commandants of Jodhpur
Jodhpur
and Bayana
Bayana
and recovered Amer by a night attack. They next killed Sayyid Hussain Khan Barha, the commandant of Mewat and many other Mughal officers. Bahadur Shah I, then in the Deccan was forced to patch up a truce with the Rajput
Rajput
Rajas.[29]

Hawa Mahal
Hawa Mahal
("Palace of Winds") in Jaipur

Over the years, the Mughals
Mughals
began to have internal disputes which greatly distracted them at times. The Mughal Empire
Mughal Empire
continued to weaken, and with the decline of the Mughal Empire
Mughal Empire
in the late 18th century, Rajputana
Rajputana
came under the influence of the Marathas. The Maratha Empire, which had replaced the Mughal Empire
Mughal Empire
as the overlord of the subcontinent, was finally replaced by the British Empire
British Empire
in 1818. In the 19th century the Rajput
Rajput
kingdoms were exhausted, they had been drained financially and in manpower after continuous wars and due to heavy tributes exacted by the Maratha Empire. In order to save their kingdoms from instability, rebellions and banditry the Rajput
Rajput
kings concluded treaties with the British in the early 19th century, accepting British suzerainty and control over their external affairs in return for internal autonomy.

The Mehrangarh Fort
Mehrangarh Fort
at Jodhpur
Jodhpur
was built by Rao Jodha
Rao Jodha
in 1459.

Modern[edit] Modern Rajasthan
Rajasthan
includes most of Rajputana, which comprises the erstwhile nineteen princely states, two chiefships, and the British district of Ajmer-Merwara.[30] Marwar
Marwar
(Jodhpur), Bikaner, Mewar (Chittorgarh), Alwar
Alwar
and Dhundhar
Dhundhar
(Jaipur) were some of the main Rajput
Rajput
princely states. Bharatpur and Dholpur
Dholpur
were Jat
Jat
princely states whereas Tonk was a princely state under a Muslim
Muslim
Nawab. Rajasthan's formerly independent kingdoms created a rich architectural and cultural heritage, seen even today in their numerous forts and palaces (Mahals and Havelis), which are enriched by features of Rajput and Jain
Jain
architecture.[citation needed] The development of frescos in Rajasthan
Rajasthan
is linked with the history of the Marwaris
Marwaris
(Jodhpur-pali), who played a crucial role in the economic development of the region.[citation needed] Many wealthy families throughout Indian history have links to Marwar. These include the legendary Birla, Bajaj, Dalmia, and Mittal families.[citation needed] See also: List of palaces in Rajasthan Geography[edit] Main article: Climate of Rajasthan

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The geographic features of Rajasthan
Rajasthan
are the Thar Desert
Thar Desert
and the Aravalli Range, which runs through the state from southwest to northeast, almost from one end to the other, for more than 850 kilometres (530 mi). Mount Abu
Mount Abu
lies at the southwestern end of the range, separated from the main ranges by the West Banas River, although a series of broken ridges continues into Haryana
Haryana
in the direction of Delhi
Delhi
where it can be seen as outcrops in the form of the Raisina Hill
Raisina Hill
and the ridges farther north. About three-fifths of Rajasthan
Rajasthan
lies northwest of the Aravallis, leaving two-fifths on the east and south direction.

Camel
Camel
ride in the Thar Desert
Thar Desert
near Jaisalmer.

The northwestern portion of Rajasthan
Rajasthan
is generally sandy and dry. Most of this region is covered by the Thar Desert
Thar Desert
which extends into adjoining portions of Pakistan. The Aravalli Range
Aravalli Range
does not intercept the moisture-giving southwest monsoon winds off the Arabian Sea, as it lies in a direction parallel to that of the coming monsoon winds, leaving the northwestern region in a rain shadow. The Thar Desert
Thar Desert
is thinly populated; the town of Jodhpur
Jodhpur
is the largest city in the desert and known as the gateway of thar desert. The desert has some major districts like Jodhpur, Jaisalmer, Barmer, Bikaner
Bikaner
and Nagour. This area is also important defence point of view. Jodhpur
Jodhpur
airbase is Indias largest airbase and military, BSF bases are also situated here. A single civil airport is also situated in Jodhpur. The Northwestern thorn scrub forests lie in a band around the Thar Desert, between the desert and the Aravallis. This region receives less than 400 mm of rain in an average year. Temperatures can sometimes exceed 54 °C in the summer months or 129 degrees Fahrenheit and drop below freezing in the winter. The Godwar, Marwar, and Shekhawati regions lie in the thorn scrub forest zone, along with the city of Jodhpur. The Luni River
Luni River
and its tributaries are the major river system of Godwar and Marwar
Marwar
regions, draining the western slopes of the Aravallis and emptying southwest into the great Rann of Kutch
Rann of Kutch
wetland in neighbouring Gujarat. This river is saline in the lower reaches and remains potable only up to Balotara in Barmer district. The Ghaggar River, which originates in Haryana, is an intermittent stream that disappears into the sands of the Thar Desert
Thar Desert
in the northern corner of the state and is seen as a remnant of the primitive Sarasvati river. The Aravalli Range
Aravalli Range
and the lands to the east and southeast of the range are generally more fertile and better watered. This region is home to the Kathiarbar-Gir dry deciduous forests
Kathiarbar-Gir dry deciduous forests
ecoregion, with tropical dry broadleaf forests that include teak, Acacia, and other trees. The hilly Vagad
Vagad
region, home to the cities of Dungarpur
Dungarpur
and Banswara
Banswara
lies in southernmost Rajasthan, on the border with Gujarat and Madhya Pradesh. With the exception of Mount Abu, Vagad
Vagad
is the wettest region in Rajasthan, and the most heavily forested. North of Vagad
Vagad
lies the Mewar
Mewar
region, home to the cities of Udaipur
Udaipur
and Chittaurgarh. The Hadoti
Hadoti
region lies to the southeast, on the border with Madhya Pradesh. North of Hadoti
Hadoti
and Mewar
Mewar
lies the Dhundhar region, home to the state capital of Jaipur. Mewat, the easternmost region of Rajasthan, borders Haryana
Haryana
and Uttar Pradesh. Eastern and southeastern Rajasthan
Rajasthan
is drained by the Banas and Chambal rivers, tributaries of the Ganges.

Hills around Jaipur, viewed from Jaigarh Fort.

The Aravalli Range
Aravalli Range
runs across the state from the southwest peak Guru Shikhar (Mount Abu), which is 1,722 metres (5,650 ft) in height, to Khetri
Khetri
in the northeast. This range divides the state into 60% in the northwest of the range and 40% in the southeast. The northwest tract is sandy and unproductive with little water but improves gradually from desert land in the far west and northwest to comparatively fertile and habitable land towards the east. The area includes the Thar Desert. The south-eastern area, higher in elevation (100 to 350 m above sea level) and more fertile, has a very diversified topography. in the south lies the hilly tract of Mewar. In the southeast, a large area within the districts of Kota and Bundi forms a tableland. To the northeast of these districts is a rugged region (badlands) following the line of the Chambal River. Farther north the country levels out; the flat plains of the northeastern Bharatpur district
Bharatpur district
are part of an alluvial basin. Merta City
Merta City
lies in the geographical centre of Rajasthan.

State symbols of Rajasthan

Formation day 1 November

State animal Chinkara[31] and Camel[32]

State bird Godavan (great Indian bustard)[31]

State flower Flower – Rohida[31]

State Tree Khejri[31]

Flora and fauna[edit]

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The great Indian bustard has been classed as critically endangered since 2011.

Though a large percentage of the total area is desert with little forest cover, Rajasthan
Rajasthan
has a rich and varied flora and fauna. The natural vegetation is classed as Northern Desert Thorn Forest (Champion 1936). These occur in small clumps scattered in a more or less open form. The density and size of patches increase from west to east following the increase in rainfall. The Desert National Park
Desert National Park
in Jaisalmer
Jaisalmer
is spread over an area of 3,162 square kilometres (1,221 sq mi), is an excellent example of the ecosystem of the Thar Desert
Thar Desert
and its diverse fauna. Seashells and massive fossilised tree trunks in this park record the geological history of the desert. The region is a haven for migratory and resident birds of the desert. One can see many eagles, harriers, falcons, buzzards, kestrels and vultures. Short-toed snake eagles (Circaetus gallicus), tawny eagles (Aquila rapax), spotted eagles (Aquila clanga), laggar falcons (Falco jugger) and kestrels are the commonest of these. The Ranthambore National Park
Ranthambore National Park
located in Sawai Madhopur,[33] one of the well known tiger reserves in the country, became a part of Project Tiger
Tiger
in 1973. The Dhosi Hill
Dhosi Hill
located in the district of Jhunjunu, known as 'Chayvan Rishi's Ashram', where 'Chyawanprash' was formulated for the first time, has unique and rare herbs growing. The Sariska Tiger
Tiger
Reserve located in Alwar
Alwar
district, 200 kilometres (120 mi) from Delhi
Delhi
and 107 kilometres (66 mi) from Jaipur, covers an area of approximately 800 square kilometres (310 sq mi). The area was declared a national park in 1979. Tal Chhapar Sanctuary
Tal Chhapar Sanctuary
is a very small sanctuary in Sujangarh, Churu District, 210 kilometres (130 mi) from Jaipur
Jaipur
in the Shekhawati region. This sanctuary is home to a large population of blackbuck. Desert foxes and the caracal, an apex predator, also known as the desert lynx, can also be spotted, along with birds such as the partridge and sand grouse.[34] The great Indian bustard, known locally as the godavan, and which is a state bird, has been classed as critically endangered since 2011.[35] Wildlife
Wildlife
protection[edit]

Reclining tiger, Ranthambore National Park

Rajasthan
Rajasthan
is also noted for its national parks and wildlife sanctuaries. There are four national park and wildlife sanctuaries: Keoladeo National Park
Keoladeo National Park
of Bharatpur, Sariska Tiger
Tiger
Reserve of Alwar, Ranthambore National Park
Ranthambore National Park
of Sawai Madhopur, and Desert National Park of Jaisalmer. A national level institute, Arid Forest Research Institute (AFRI) an autonomous institute of the ministry of forestry is situated in Jodhpur
Jodhpur
and continuously work on desert flora and their conservation. Ranthambore National Park
Ranthambore National Park
is 7 km from Sawai Madhopur
Sawai Madhopur
Railway Station. it is known worldwide for its tiger population and is considered by both wilderness lovers and photographers as one of the best place in India
India
to spot tigers. At one point, due to poaching and negligence, tigers became extinct at Sariska, but five tigers have been relocated there.[36] Prominent among the wildlife sanctuaries are Mount Abu
Mount Abu
Sanctuary, Bhensrod Garh Sanctuary, Darrah Sanctuary, Jaisamand Sanctuary, Kumbhalgarh
Kumbhalgarh
Wildlife
Wildlife
Sanctuary, Jawahar Sagar sanctuary, and Sita Mata Wildlife
Wildlife
Sanctuary. Communication[edit] Major ISP and Telecom companies are present in Rajasthan
Rajasthan
including Airtel, Data Infosys Limited, Reliance Limited, Jio, RAILTEL, Software Technology Parks of India
India
(STPI), Tata Telecom and Vodafone. Data Infosys was the first Internet Service Provider[37](ISP) to bring internet in Rajasthan
Rajasthan
in April 1999 and OASIS was first private mobile telephone company. Email in Hindi[edit] Chief Minister Vasundhara Raje
Vasundhara Raje
of Rajasthan
Rajasthan
launched one Free Email address @rajasthan.in and @राजस्थान.भारत domain.[38] Rajasthan
Rajasthan
state became the World's first state to provide email address to every citizen in their own language. Government and politics[edit] Main articles: Politics of Rajasthan, Government of Rajasthan, and Legislative Assembly of Rajasthan The politics of Rajasthan
Rajasthan
is dominated mainly by the Bharatiya Janata Party and the Indian National Congress. The Chief Minister, serving the second term, is Vasundhara Raje. Administrative divisions[edit]

The Jain
Jain
temple at Ranakpur
Ranakpur
is in Pali district.

Main articles: Divisions of Rajasthan
Divisions of Rajasthan
and Districts of Rajasthan Rajasthan
Rajasthan
is divided into 33 districts within seven divisions:

Division Districts

Jaipur

Jaipur Alwar Jhunjhunu Sikar Dausa

Jodhpur

Barmer Jaisalmer Jalore Jodhpur Pali Sirohi

Ajmer

Ajmer Bhilwara Nagaur Tonk

Udaipur

Udaipur Banswara Chittorgarh Pratapgarh Dungarpur Rajsamand

Bikaner

Bikaner Churu Sri Ganganagar Hanumangarh

Kota

Baran Bundi Jhalawar Kota

Bharatpur

Bharatpur Dholpur Karauli Sawai Madhopur

Economy[edit]

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Main article: Economy of Rajasthan Rajasthan's economy is primarily agricultural and pastoral. Wheat and barley are cultivated over large areas, as are pulses, sugarcane, and oilseeds. Cotton and tobacco are the state's cash crops. Rajasthan
Rajasthan
is among the largest producers of edible oils in India
India
and the second largest producer of oilseeds. Rajasthan
Rajasthan
is also the biggest wool-producing state in India
India
and the main opium producer and consumer. There are mainly two crop seasons. The water for irrigation comes from wells and tanks. The Indira Gandhi Canal
Indira Gandhi Canal
irrigates northwestern Rajasthan.

A marble quarry in Kishangarh
Kishangarh
Ajmer.

The main industries are mineral based, agriculture based, and textile based. Rajasthan
Rajasthan
is the second largest producer of polyester fibre in India. Several prominent chemical and engineering companies are located in the city of Kota, in southern Rajasthan. Rajasthan
Rajasthan
is pre-eminent in quarrying and mining in India. The Taj Mahal
Taj Mahal
was built from the white marble which was mined from a town called Makrana. The state is the second largest source of cement in India. It has rich salt deposits at Sambhar, copper mines at Khetri, Jhunjhunu, and zinc mines at Dariba, Zawar mines and Rampura Agucha (opencast) near Bhilwara. Dimensional stone mining is also undertaken in Rajasthan. Jodhpur
Jodhpur
sandstone is mostly used in monuments, important buildings and residential buildings. This stone is termed as "chittar patthar". Jodhpur
Jodhpur
leads in Handicraft
Handicraft
and Guar Gum
Guar Gum
industry. Rajasthan
Rajasthan
is also a part of the Mumbai- Delhi
Delhi
Industrial corridor is set to benefit economically. The State gets 39% of the DMIC, with major districts of Jaipur, Alwar, Kota and Bhilwara
Bhilwara
benefiting.[39]

The Indira Gandhi Canal
Indira Gandhi Canal
passes through the Thar Desert
Thar Desert
near Ramgarh, Jaisalmer.

Crude oil and Mineral stones

Rajasthan
Rajasthan
is[when?] earning Rs. 150 million (approx. US$2.5 million) per day as revenue from the crude oil sector. This earning is expected to reach ₹250 million per day in 2013 (which is an increase of ₹100 million or more than 66 percent). The government of India
India
has given permission to extract 300,000 barrels of crude per day from Barmer region which is now 175,000 barrels per day. Once this limit is achieved Rajasthan
Rajasthan
will become a leader in Crude extraction in Country. Bombay High leads with a production of 250,000 barrels crude per day. Once the limit of 300,000 barrels per day is reached, the overall production of the country will increase by 15 percent. Cairn India
India
is doing the work of exploration and extraction of crude oil in Rajasthan. Rajasthan
Rajasthan
has rich reserves of limestone.Niki Chemical Industries, Jodhpur
Jodhpur
is one of the largest manufacturer of Slaked lime (Hydrated Lime or Ca(OH)2) Agricultural production[edit]

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Rajasthan
Rajasthan
is the largest producer of barley, mustard, pearl millet, coriander, fenugreek and guar in India. Ramganj Mandi
Ramganj Mandi
in Kota district is the Asia's largest mandi or market of coriander. Rajasthan
Rajasthan
produces over 72% of guar of the world and 60% of India's barley. Rajasthan
Rajasthan
is major producer of aloe vera, amla, oranges leading producer of maize, groundnut. Rajasthan
Rajasthan
is 2nd in production of cumin, gram and 3rd in seed spices.[clarification needed] Rajasthan
Rajasthan
government had initiated olive cultivation with technical support from Israel.The current production of olives in the state is around 100-110 tonnes annually. Rajasthan
Rajasthan
is India's second largest producer of milk. Rajasthan
Rajasthan
has 13800 dairy co-operative societies. Transport[edit]

Jaipur
Jaipur
International Airport

Road Tunnel in Jaipur
Jaipur
Rajasthan

NH 8
NH 8
between Udaipur
Udaipur
and Ahmedabad.

Rajasthan
Rajasthan
is connected by many national highways. Most renowned being NH 8, which is India's first 4–8 lane highway.[40] Rajasthan
Rajasthan
also has an inter-city surface transport system both in terms of railways and bus network. All chief cities are connected by air, rail and road.

Air

There are three main airports at Rajasthan
Rajasthan
- Jaipur
Jaipur
International Airport, Jodhpur
Jodhpur
Airport, Udaipur
Udaipur
Airport and the recently started Bikaner
Bikaner
Airport and Jaisalmer. These airports connect Rajasthan
Rajasthan
with the major cities of India
India
such as Delhi
Delhi
and Mumbai. There is another airport in Kota but is not open for commercial/civilian flights yet. One more airport at Kishangarh, Ajmer
Ajmer
.i.e. Kishangarh Airport
Kishangarh Airport
is being constructed by the Airport Authority of India.

Rail

Rajasthan
Rajasthan
is connected with the main cities of India
India
by rail.[41] Jaipur, Jodhpur, Kota, Bharatpur, Bikaner, Ajmer, Alwar, Abu Road
Abu Road
and Udaipur
Udaipur
are the principal railway stations in Rajasthan. Kota City is the only Electrified Section served by three Rajdhani Expresses and trains to all major cities of India. There is also an international railway, the Thar Express from Jodhpur
Jodhpur
(India) to Karachi
Karachi
(Pakistan). However, this is not open to foreign nationals.

Road

Rajasthan
Rajasthan
is well connected to the main cities of the country including Delhi, Ahmedabad
Ahmedabad
and Indore
Indore
by State and National Highways and served by Rajasthan State Road Transport Corporation
Rajasthan State Road Transport Corporation
(RSRTC)[42] and Private operators. Now in March 2017,75 per cent of all national highways being built in Rajasthan
Rajasthan
according to the public works minister of Rajasthan. Indian Army signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) with Rajasthan State Government to improve infrastructure for their posts near the India- Pakistan
Pakistan
border. As per the terms of the MoU, Indian Army will be able to use an airstrip in Lalgarh-Jatan area in Sri Ganganagar district of Rajasthan
Rajasthan
for 10 years. Rajasthan
Rajasthan
State Government has sanctioned funds for this airstrip, which is near the India-Pakistan border. Besides, Indian Army can undertake temporary construction work as per their requirement in the border areas of the state. Demographics[edit] See also: List of people from Rajasthan

Religion in Rajasthan
Religion in Rajasthan
(2011)[43]    Hinduism
Hinduism
(88.49%)    Islam
Islam
(9.07%)    Sikhism
Sikhism
(1.27%)    Jainism
Jainism
(0.91%)    Christianity
Christianity
(0.14%)    Buddhism
Buddhism
(0.02%)   Other religions (0.006%)   Atheist (0.001%)

Children performing for Independence Day in village in Alwar
Alwar
district, Rajasthan

According to final results of 2011 Census of India, Rajasthan
Rajasthan
has a total population of 68,548,437.[1] Rajasthan's population is made up mainly of Hindus, who account for 88.49% of the population. Muslims make up 9.07%, Sikhs
Sikhs
1.27% and Jains 0.91% of the population.[44] The state of Rajasthan
Rajasthan
is also populated by Sindhis, who came to Rajasthan from Sindh
Sindh
province (now in Pakistan) during the India-Pakistan separation in 1947.

Largest cities of Rajasthan
Rajasthan
by population

City Name Population

Jaipur

3,073,349

Jodhpur

1,138,300

Kota

1,001,694

Bikaner

647,804

Ajmer

551,101

Udaipur

474,531

Bhilwara

360,009

Alwar

341,422

Bharatpur

252,838

Sri Ganganagar

249,914

Language[edit] Hindi
Hindi
is the official and the most widely spoken language in the state (90.97% of the population as per the 2001 census), followed by Bhili (4.60%), Punjabi (2.01%), and Urdu
Urdu
(1.17%).[45] The languages taught under the three-language formula are:[46] First Language: Hindi Second Language: English Third Language: Urdu/Sindhi/Punjabi/Sanskrit/Gujarati Culture[edit]

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Main article: Culture of Rajasthan

Part of a series on

Rajasthani people

Culture

Architecture Art Cinema Cuisine

Literature

Music

Religion

Tourism

Religion

Hinduism Islam Jainism Sufism

Language

Rajasthani

Rajasthan
Rajasthan
Portal

v t e

Rajasthan
Rajasthan
is culturally rich and has artistic and cultural traditions which reflect the ancient Indian way of life. There is rich and varied folk culture from villages which are often depicted as a symbol of the state. Highly cultivated classical music and dance with its own distinct style is part of the cultural tradition of Rajasthan. The music has songs that depict day-to-day relationships and chores, often focused around fetching water from wells or ponds.

Special
Special
Jodhpuri Mirchi vada

Rajasthani cooking was influenced by both the war-like lifestyles of its inhabitants and the availability of ingredients in this arid region. Food[47] that could last for several days and could be eaten without heating was preferred. The scarcity of water and fresh green vegetables have all had their effect on the cooking. It is known for its snacks like Bikaneri Bhujia. Other famous dishes include bajre ki roti (millet bread) and lahsun ki chutney (hot garlic paste), mawa kachori Mirchi Bada, Pyaaj Kachori and ghevar from Jodhpur, Alwar
Alwar
ka Mawa( Milk
Milk
Cake), Kadhi kachori from Ajmer, malpauas from Pushkar
Pushkar
and rassgollas from Bikaner. Originating from the Marwar
Marwar
region of the state is the concept Marwari Bhojnalaya, or vegetarian restaurants, today found in many parts of India, which offer vegetarian food of the Marwari people. Sawai Madhopur
Sawai Madhopur
is famous for it good quality Guava. Around 30 km around the city the farmers are growing the Guava of good quality and they are supplying thought the Rajasthan. Dal-Bati-Churma is very popular in Rajasthan. The traditional way to serve it is to first coarsely mash the Baati then pour pure Ghee on top of it. It is served with the daal (lentils) and spicy garlic chutney. Also served with Besan (gram flour) ki kadi. It is commonly served at all festivities, including religious occasions, wedding ceremonies, and birthday parties in Rajasthan. "Dal-Baati-Churma", is a combination of three different food items — Daal (lentils), Baati and Churma (Sweet). It is a typical Rajasthani dish.

"Up-down" dolls are found in the roadside shops of Jaisalmer.

The Ghoomar
Ghoomar
dance from Jodhpur
Jodhpur
Marwar
Marwar
and Kalbeliya
Kalbeliya
dance of Jaisalmer have gained international recognition. Folk music is a large part of Rajasthani culture. Kathputli, Bhopa, Chang, Teratali, Ghindr, Kachchhighori, and Tejaji
Tejaji
are examples of traditional Rajasthani culture. Folk songs are commonly ballads which relate heroic deeds and love stories; and religious or devotional songs known as bhajans and banis which are often accompanied by musical instruments like dholak, sitar, and sarangi are also sung.

Traditional musical instruments of Rajasthan

Rajasthan
Rajasthan
is known for its traditional, colourful art. The block prints, tie and dye prints, Bagaru prints, Sanganer prints, and Zari embroidery are major export products from Rajasthan. Handicraft
Handicraft
items like wooden furniture and crafts, carpets, and blue pottery are commonly found here. Shopping reflects the colourful culture, Rajasthani clothes have a lot of mirror work and embroidery. A Rajasthani traditional dress for females comprises an ankle-length skirt and a short top, also known as a lehenga or a chaniya choli. A piece of cloth is used to cover the head, both for protection from heat and maintenance of modesty. Rajasthani dresses are usually designed in bright colours like blue, yellow and orange.

A traditional folk singer practising in front of Jodhpur
Jodhpur
fort.

The main religious festivals are Deepawali, Holi, Gangaur, Teej, Gogaji, Shri Devnarayan
Devnarayan
Jayanti, Makar Sankranti
Makar Sankranti
and Janmashtami, as the main religion is Hinduism. Rajasthan's desert festival is held once a year during winter. Dressed in costumes, the people of the desert dance and sing ballads. There are fairs with snake charmers, puppeteers, acrobats and folk performers. Camels play a role in this festival. The phenomenon of spirit possession has been documented in modern Rajasthan. Some of the spirits that are claimed to possess Rajasthanis are seen as good and beneficial while others are seen as malevolent. The good spirits include murdered royalty, the underworld god Bhaironji, and Muslim
Muslim
saints. Bad spirits include perpetual debtors who die in debt, stillborn infants, deceased widows, and foreign tourists. The possessed individual is referred to as a ghorala ("mount"). Possession, even if it is by a benign spirit, is regarded as undesirable, as it entails loss of self-control and violent emotional outbursts.[48] Education[edit] See also: List of institutions of higher education in Rajasthan

Children at a non-formal education centre

AIIMS Campus at Jodhpur.

During recent years, Rajasthan
Rajasthan
has worked on improving education. The state government has been making sustained efforts to raise the education standard. Rajasthan
Rajasthan
produces 30% CA's of India. Rajasthani are topping in IAS, IIT JEE, science olympiads. Literacy[edit] In recent decades, the literacy rate of Rajasthan
Rajasthan
has increased significantly. In 1991, the state's literacy rate was only 38.55% (54.99% male and 20.44% female). In 2001, the literacy rate increased to 60.41% (75.70% male and 43.85% female). This was the highest leap in the percentage of literacy recorded in India
India
(the rise in female literacy being 23%).[49] At the Census 2011, Rajasthan
Rajasthan
had a literacy rate of 67.06% (80.51% male and 52.66% female). Although Rajasthan's literacy rate is below the national average of 74.04% and although its female literacy rate is the lowest in the country, the state has been praised for its efforts and achievements in raising literacy rates.[50][51] In rural areas of Rajasthan, the literacy rate is 76.16% for males and 45.8% for females. This has been debated across all the party level except BJP, when the governor of Rajasthan
Rajasthan
set a minimum educational qualification for the village panchayat elections.[52][53][54] Schools[edit] Rajasthan
Rajasthan
has 55,000 primary and 7,400 secondary schools. Higher education[edit] In Rajasthan, Jodhpur
Jodhpur
and Kota are major education hubs. Kota is known for its quality education in preparation for competitive exams, coaching for medical and engineering exams, while Jodhpur
Jodhpur
is home to many higher education institutions like IIT,NIT, AIIMS, National Law University, Sardar Patel Police University, National Institute of Fashion Technology, MBM Engineering College etc. Kota is popularly referred to as, "coaching capital of India". Other major education institutions are Birla Institute of Technology and Science
Birla Institute of Technology and Science
Pilani, Indian Institute of Technology
Indian Institute of Technology
Jodhpur, Indian Instiute of Information Technology, Kota, Malaviya National Institute of Technology, Jaipur, IIM Udaipur, AIIMS Jodhpur
Jodhpur
and LNMIIT. Rajasthan
Rajasthan
has nine universities and more than 250 colleges. There are 41 engineering colleges with an annual enrolment of about 11,500 students. Apart from above there are 41 private universities like Singhania University, Pacheri Bari Amity University Rajasthan (Jaipur), Mewar
Mewar
University Chittorgarh, OPJS University, Churu, Mody University of Technology and Science Lakshmangarh (Women's University, Sikar), RNB Global University, Bikaner. The state has 23 polytechnic colleges and 152 Industrial Training Institutes (ITIs) that impart vocational training.[55] In 2009, Central University of Rajasthan
Central University of Rajasthan
a central university fully funded by Government of India, came into force near Kishangarh
Kishangarh
in Ajmer
Ajmer
district Tourism[edit]

Blue City- a beautiful Aerial view

Main article: Tourism in Rajasthan Rajasthan
Rajasthan
attracted 14 percent of total foreign visitors during 2009–2010 which is the fourth highest among Indian states. It is fourth also in Domestic tourist visitors.[56] Tourism is a flourishing industry in Rajasthan. The palaces of Jaipur
Jaipur
and Ajmer-Pushkar, the lakes of Udaipur, the desert forts of Jodhpur, Taragarh Fort (Star Fort) in Ajmer, and Bikaner
Bikaner
and Jaisalmer
Jaisalmer
rank among the most preferred destinations in India
India
for many tourists both Indian and foreign. Tourism accounts for eight percent of the state's domestic product. Many old and neglected palaces and forts have been converted into heritage hotels. Tourism has increased employment in the hospitality sector.

Pushkar
Pushkar
Lake, a sacred Hindu lake, is surrounded by fifty-two bathing ghats.

Rajasthan
Rajasthan
is famous for its forts, carved temples, and decorated havelis, which were built by Rajput
Rajput
kings in pre- Muslim
Muslim
era Rajasthan.[citation needed] Rajasthan's Jaipur
Jaipur
Jantar Mantar, Mehrangarh Fort
Mehrangarh Fort
and Stepwell
Stepwell
of Jodhpur, Dilwara Temples, Chittor Fort, Lake Palace, miniature paintings in Bundi, and numerous city palaces and haveli's are part of the architectural heritage of India. Jaipur, the Pink City, is noted for the ancient houses made of a type of sandstone dominated by a pink hue. In Jodhpur, maximum houses are painted blue. At Ajmer, there is white marble Bara-dari on the Anasagar
Anasagar
lake. Jain
Jain
Temples dot Rajasthan
Rajasthan
from north to south and east to west. Dilwara Temples
Dilwara Temples
of Mount Abu, Ranakpur
Ranakpur
Temple dedicated to Lord Adinath in Pali District, Jain
Jain
temples in the fort complexes of Chittor, Jaisalmer
Jaisalmer
and Kumbhalgarh, Lodurva Jain
Jain
temples, Mirpur Jain Temple of Sirohi, Sarun Mata Temple kotputli, Bhandasar and Karni Mata Temple of Bikaner
Bikaner
and Mandore
Mandore
of Jodhpur
Jodhpur
are some of the best examples.[57]

See also[edit]

Rajasthan
Rajasthan
portal India
India
portal South Asia portal Asia portal

Outline of Rajasthan List of people from Rajasthan Tourism in Rajasthan

References[edit]

^ a b " Rajasthan
Rajasthan
Profile" (PDF). Census of India. Retrieved 21 July 2016.  ^ "Report of the Commissioner for linguistic minorities: 52nd report (July 2014 to June 2015)" (PDF). Commissioner for Linguistic Minorities, Ministry of Minority Affairs, Government of India. pp. 34–35. Archived from the original (PDF) on 28 December 2017. Retrieved 16 February 2016.  ^ "Symbols of Rajasthan". Government of Rajasthan. Retrieved 13 November 2016.  ^ Tara Boland-Crewe, David Lea, The Territories and States of India, p. 208. ^ http://www.answers.com/Q/How_many_state_border_touches_rajasthan?#slide=1 ^ "World Heritage List".  ^ R.K. Gupta; S.R. Bakshi (1 January 2008). Studies In Indian History: Rajasthan
Rajasthan
Through The Ages The Heritage Of Rajputs
Rajputs
(Set Of 5 Vols.). Sarup & Sons. pp. 143–. ISBN 978-81-7625-841-8.  ^ F. K. Kapil (1990). Rajputana
Rajputana
states, 1817–1950. Book Treasure. p. 1.  ^ John Keay
John Keay
(2001). India: a history. Grove Press. pp. 231–232. ISBN 0-8021-3797-0. ISBN 978-0-8021-3797-5. Colonel James Todd, who, as the first British official to visit Rajasthan, spent most of the 1820s exploring its political potential, formed a very different idea of "Rush boots" […] and the whole region thenceforth became, for the British, 'Rajputana'. The word even achieved a retrospective authenticity, [for,] in [his] 1829 translation of Ferishta's history of early Islamic India, John Bridge discarded the phrase 'Indian princes', as rendered in Dow's earlier version, and substituted 'Rajpoot princes'.Many great scientists like aryabhatta cv raman were born here  ^ "INDUS VALLEY CIVILIZATION Related Articles arsenical bronze writing, literature". Amazines.com. Retrieved 5 June 2012.  ^ Ramananda Chatterjee (1948). The Modern review (History). 84. Prabasi Press Private Ltd.  ^ Sita Sharma; Pragati Prakashan (1987). Krishna Leela theme in Rajasthani miniatures. p. 132.  ^ a b Rajasthan
Rajasthan
aajtak. ISBN 81-903622-6-7.  ^ Sudhir Bhargava, "Location of Brahmavarta and Drishadwati
Drishadwati
river is important to find earliest alignment of Saraswati river" Seminar, Saraswati river-a perspective, 20–22 Nov. 2009, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra, organised by: Saraswati Nadi Shodh Sansthan, Haryana, Seminar Report: pages 114-117 ^ Manusmriti ^ "The dynastic art of the Kushans", John Rosenfield, p 130. ^ R.C. Majumdar (1994). Ancient India. Motilal Banarsidassr. p. 263. ISBN 81-208-0436-8, ISBN 978-81-208-0436-4.  ^ Asiatic Society of Bombay (1904). Journal of the Asiatic Society of Bombay, Volume 21. Royal Asiatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Bombay Branch. p. 432. Up to the tenth century almost the whole of North India, excepting Bengal, owned their supremacy at Kannauj.  ^ Radhey Shyam Chaurasia (2002). History of Ancient India: Earliest Times to 1000 A. D. Atlantic Publishers & Distributors. p. 207 to 208. ISBN 81-269-0027-X. ISBN 978-81-269-0027-5.  ^ https://books.google.co.in/books/about/Mina_the_ruling_tribe_of_Rajasthan.html?id=jF9uAAAAMAAJ ^ Bhardwaj, K. K. "Hemu-Napoleon of Medieval India", Mittal Publications, New Delhi, p.25 ^ R.C.Majumdar, H.C.Raychaudhury, Kalikaranjan Datta: An Advanced History of India, fourth edition, 1978, ISBN 0-333-90298-X, Page-535 ^ (Elliot's History of India, Vol. V) ^ John Richards 1995 pg=26 ^ Chandra, Satish (2000). Medieval India. New Delhi: National Council of Educational Research and Training. p. 164.  ^ a b Pant 2012, p. 129. ^ Storia do Mogor By Niccolao Manucci ^ Cambridge history of India
India
pg. 304 ^ The Cambridge History of India, Volume 3 pg 322 ^ R.K. Gupta; S.R. Bakshi (1 January 2008). Studies in Indian History: Rajasthan
Rajasthan
Through The Ages The Heritage Of Rajputs
Rajputs
(5 Vols.). Sarup & Sons. pp. 143–. ISBN 978-81-7625-841-8.  ^ a b c d "States and Union Territories Symbols". Archived from the original on 12 November 2013. Retrieved 7 July 2014.  ^ "Now the state animal camel". Patrika Group. 1 July 2014. Retrieved 7 July 2014.  ^ Sadhu, Ayan; Jayam, Peter Prem Chakravarthi; Qureshi, Qamar; Shekhawat, Raghuvir Singh; Sharma, Sudarshan; Jhala, Yadvendradev Vikramsinh (2017-11-28). "Demography of a small, isolated tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) population in a semi-arid region of western India". BMC Zoology. 2: 16. doi:10.1186/s40850-017-0025-y. ISSN 2056-3132.  ^ "Caracal". Global Twitcher. Retrieved 7 January 2013.  ^ "Ardeotis Nigriceps". The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources. Retrieved 31 December 2015.  ^ "A tale of two tiger reserves". The Hindu. Jaipur. 21 March 2012. Retrieved 29 January 2014.  ^ "Rajasthan's first ISP". timesofindia-economictimes. Retrieved 10 June 2016.  ^ "Please read this article on Bhaskar.com http://epaper.bhaskar.com/detail/1327726/1242543678/0/map/tabs-1/12-04-2017/18/4/image/". epaper.bhaskar.com. Retrieved 2017-12-09.  External link in title= (help) ^ "Business Opportunities". Government of Rajasthan. Archived from the original on 10 February 2014. Retrieved 11 February 2014.  ^ " Rajasthan
Rajasthan
National Highways - List of Rajasthan
Rajasthan
Roads and Highway". Retrieved 18 December 2016.  ^ " Rajasthan
Rajasthan
Railways". Retrieved 18 December 2016.  ^ "rsrtc.gov.in". Retrieved 18 December 2016.  ^ "Population by religion community – 2011". Census of India, 2011. The Registrar General & Census Commissioner, India. Archived from the original on 25 August 2015.  ^ "Census of India".  ^ "Report of the Commissioner for linguistic minorities: 50th report (July 2012 to June 2013)" (PDF). Commissioner for Linguistic Minorities, Ministry of Minority Affairs, Government of India. p. 22. Retrieved 26 December 2014.  ^ "51st REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER FOR LINGUISTIC MINORITIES IN INDIA" (PDF). nclm.nic.in. Ministry of Minority Affairs. 15 July 2015. p. 44. Retrieved 15 February 2018.  ^ https://fashionablefoodz.com/travel-tales-cuisines-of-rajasthan/ ^ Jeffrey G. Snodgrass, "Imitation Is Far More than the Sincerest of Flattery: The Mimetic Power of Spirit Possession in Rajasthan, India," Cultural Anthropology, Vol. 17, No. 1 (Feb. 2002), pp. 32–64. ^ "Directorate of Literacy
Literacy
and Continuing Education: Government of Rajasthan". Rajliteracy.org. Archived from the original on 23 March 2012. Retrieved 5 June 2012.  ^ " Rajasthan
Rajasthan
literacy rate now 67.06 : Census Data Census 2011 Indian Population". Census2011.co.in. 27 April 2011. Archived from the original on 23 March 2012. Retrieved 5 June 2012.  ^ " Rajasthan
Rajasthan
Population 2011 – Growth rate, literacy, sex ratio in Census 2011 "2011 Updates" InfoPiper". Infopiper.com. Archived from the original on 23 March 2012. Retrieved 5 June 2012.  ^ " Rajasthan
Rajasthan
Governor fixes minimum education qualifications for Panchayat polls". The Indian Express. 22 December 2014. Retrieved 16 June 2015.  ^ "Lok Sabha TV Insights: Educational Qualification and Elections". INSIGHTS. Retrieved 16 June 2015.  ^ " Rajasthan
Rajasthan
Education". Rajshiksha.  ^ " Rajasthan
Rajasthan
Education, Education in Rajasthan". Mapsofindia.com. 1 December 2011. Retrieved 5 June 2012.  ^ " India
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Inbound Tourism Statistics, India
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Inbound Visitors Summary, India
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Tourism Statistics Inbound tourism Growth Statistics India". Itopc.org. Archived from the original on 4 August 2012. Retrieved 5 June 2012.  ^ "Tourist Places to Visit in Rajasthan
Rajasthan
- Rajasthan
Rajasthan
Tourism". tourism.rajasthan.gov.in. Retrieved 2016-11-16. 

Further reading[edit]

Bhattacharya, Manoshi. 2008. The Royal Rajputs: Strange Tales and Stranger Truths. Rupa & Co, New Delhi. Gahlot, Sukhvirsingh. 1992. RAJASTHAN: Historical & Cultural. J. S. Gahlot Research Institute, Jodhpur. Somani, Ram Vallabh. 1993. History of Rajasthan. Jain
Jain
Pustak Mandir, Jaipur. Tod, James & Crooke, William. 1829. Annals and Antiquities of Rajast'han or the Central and Western Rajpoot States of India,. Numerous reprints, including 3 Vols. Reprint: Low Price Publications, Delhi. 1990. ISBN 81-85395-68-3 (set of 3 vols.) Mathur, P.C., 1995. Social and Economic Dynamics of Rajasthan
Rajasthan
Politics (Jaipur, Aaalekh)

External links[edit]

Find more aboutRajasthanat's sister projects

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Government

Official Site of the Government of Rajasthan, India Official Tourism Site of Rajasthan, India

General information

Rajasthan
Rajasthan
Encyclopædia Britannica entry Rajasthan
Rajasthan
at Curlie (based on DMOZ) Geographic data related to Rajasthan
Rajasthan
at OpenStreetMap

v t e

State of Rajasthan

Capital: Jaipur

Outline

Geography Climate Cuisine Economy History Politics Government Tourism Language Rivers Highest point Films Institutions of higher education Municipalities Chief Secretaries Chief Justices of Rajasthan
Rajasthan
High Court

Governance

Governors Chief Ministers Speaker Legislative Assembly Political parties Constituencies of Rajasthan
Rajasthan
Legislative Assembly High Court Police

Divisions and districts

Ajmer
Ajmer
Division

Ajmer
Ajmer
district Bhilwara
Bhilwara
district Nagaur
Nagaur
district Tonk district

Bharatpur Division

Bharatpur district Dholpur
Dholpur
district Karauli
Karauli
district Sawai Madhopur
Sawai Madhopur
district

Bikaner
Bikaner
Division

Bikaner
Bikaner
district Churu
Churu
district Sri Ganganagar
Sri Ganganagar
district Hanumangarh
Hanumangarh
district

Jaipur
Jaipur
Division

Alwar
Alwar
district Dausa
Dausa
district Jaipur
Jaipur
district Jhunjhunu
Jhunjhunu
district Sikar
Sikar
district

Jodhpur
Jodhpur
Division

Barmer district Jaisalmer
Jaisalmer
district Jalor district Jodhpur
Jodhpur
district Pali district Sirohi
Sirohi
district

Kota Division

Baran district Bundi
Bundi
district Jhalawar
Jhalawar
district Kota district

Udaipur
Udaipur
Division

Banswara
Banswara
district Chittorgarh
Chittorgarh
district Dungarpur
Dungarpur
district Pratapgarh district Rajsamand
Rajsamand
district Udaipur
Udaipur
district

Major cities

Jaipur
Jaipur
(capital) Alwar Ajmer Bikaner Jodhpur Kota Udaipur

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Forts in Rajasthan Hydrography of Rajathan Power stations and power organisations

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Divisions and Districts of Rajasthan

Ajmer
Ajmer
division

Ajmer
Ajmer
district

Ajmer Kekri Kiranipura Kishangarh Nasirabad Pushkar Sarwar Beawar Vijainagar

Bhilwara
Bhilwara
district

Asind Beejoliya Kalan Bhilwara Gangapur Gulabpura Jahazpur Mandalgarh Shahpura

Nagaur
Nagaur
district

Basni Belima Didwana Goredi Chancha Kuchaman City Kuchera Ladnun Makrana Merta City Mundwa Nagaur Nawa Parbatsar

Tonk district

Deoli Malpura Niwai Todaraisingh Tonk Uniara Vanasthali Dev Dham Jodhpuriya Manoharpura Kacholiya

Bharatpur division

Bharatpur district

Bayana Bharatpur Bhusawar Deeg Farsho Kaman Kumher Nadbai Nagar Weir Jurehra Pahadi

Dholpur
Dholpur
district

Bari Dholpur Rajakhera Sarmathura

Karauli
Karauli
district

Hindaun Karauli Todabhim Mandrayal Suroth Shri Mahaveer Ji Mahu Ibrahimpur Kailadevi Karanpur Kurhganv Langra Rodhai

Sawai Madhopur district

Gangapur Mahu Kalan Sawai Madhopur Todra

Bikaner
Bikaner
division

Bikaner
Bikaner
district

Bikaner Deshnoke Dungargarh Khajuwala Loonkaransar Udasar Napasar Nokha

Churu
Churu
district

Bidasar Chhapar Churu Dungargarh Rajaldesar Rajgarh Ratangarh Ratannagar Sardarshahar Sujangarh Taranagar

Sri Ganganagar district

Anupgarh Gajsinghpur Ganeshgarh Karanpur Kesrisinghpur Padampur Raisinghnagar Rawla Mandi Sadulshahar Sri Ganganagar Suratgarh Vijainagar

Hanumangarh district

Bhadra Hanumangarh Nohar Pilibanga Rawatsar Sangaria

Jaipur
Jaipur
division

Alwar
Alwar
district

Alwar Behror Bhiwadi Govindgarh Khairthal Kherli Kishangarh Rajgarh Tijara

Dausa
Dausa
district

Bandikui Dausa Lalsot Mahwa Mandawar

Jaipur
Jaipur
district

Bagru Bairat Chaksu Chomu Jaipur Jamwa Ramgarh Jobner Kishangarh
Kishangarh
Renwal Kotputli Phagi Phulera Sambhar Shahpura

Jhunjhunu
Jhunjhunu
district

Baggar Bissau Buhana Chirawa Gothra Gudhagorji Jhunjhunu Khetri Kodesar Malsisar Mandawa Mukandgarh Nawalgarh Pilani Surajgarh Togra Sawroop Singh Udaipurwati Vidyavihar

Sikar
Sikar
district

Fatehpur Khandela Khatushyamji Lachhmangarh Losal Neem-Ka-Thana Ramgarh Reengus Sikar Sri Madhopur

Jodhpur
Jodhpur
division

Barmer district

Balotra Barmer Gudamalani Siwana Dhorimana Sheo Sindhri Samdari

Jaisalmer
Jaisalmer
district

Jaisalmer Pokhran

Jalore
Jalore
district

Bhinmal Jalore Sanchore Ahore Raniwara

Jodhpur
Jodhpur
district

Bilara Jodhpur Phalodi Piparcity Bhopalgarh Osian

Pali district

Bali Falna Jaitaran Marwar
Marwar
Junction Pali Rani Nimaj Sadri Sojat Sojat
Sojat
Road Sumerpur Takhatgarh Nadol

Sirohi
Sirohi
district

Abu Road Mount Abu Pindwara Sheoganj Sirohi

Kota division

Baran district

Antah Atru Baran Chhabra Chhipabarod Kherliganj Mangrol

Bundi
Bundi
district

Budhpura Bundi Indragarh Kaprain Keshoraipatan Lakheri Nainwa

Jhalawar
Jhalawar
district

Aklera Bakani Bhawani Mandi Jhalawar Jhalrapatan Kolvi Mandi Rajendra pura Manohar Thana Pirawa

Kota district

Chechat Kaithoon Kota Kumbhkot Modak Ramganj Mandi Sangod Satalkheri Sogariya Suket Udpura

Udaipur
Udaipur
division

Banswara
Banswara
district

Banswara Kushalgarh Partapur

Chittorgarh
Chittorgarh
district

Bari Sadri Begun Chittorgarh Kapasan Nimbahera Rawatbhata

Dungarpur
Dungarpur
district

Dungarpur Galiakot Sagwara Simalwara

Pratapgarh district

Chhoti Sadri Pratapgarh

Rajsamand
Rajsamand
district

Amet Dariba Devgrah Nathdwara Rajsamand

Udaipur
Udaipur
district

Bhalariya Bhinder Dhariawad Fatehnagar Jhadol Kanor Kherwara Chhaoni Newa Talai Rikhabdeo Salumbar Saradit Udaipur

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States and union territories of India

States

Arunachal Pradesh Andhra Pradesh Assam Bihar Chhattisgarh Goa Gujarat Haryana Himachal Pradesh Jammu and Kashmir Jharkhand Karnataka Kerala Madhya Pradesh Maharashtra Manipur Meghalaya Mizoram Nagaland Odisha Punjab Rajasthan Sikkim Tamil Nadu Telangana Tripura Uttar Pradesh Uttarakhand West Bengal

Union Territories

Andaman and Nicobar Islands Chandigarh Dadra and Nagar Haveli National Capital Territory of Delhi Daman and Diu Lakshadweep Puducherry

Capitals in India Proposed states and territories Historical Regions

.