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Hayao Miyazaki
Hayao Miyazaki
(宮崎 駿, Miyazaki Hayao, born January 5, 1941) is a Japanese film director, producer, screenwriter, animator, author, and manga artist. A co-founder of Studio Ghibli, a film and animation studio, he has attained international acclaim as a masterful storyteller and as a maker of anime feature films, and is widely regarded as one of the greatest animation directors. Born in Bunkyō
Bunkyō
Ward of Tokyo, Miyazaki expressed interest in manga and animation from an early age, and he joined Toei Animation
Toei Animation
in 1963. During his early years at Toei Animation
Toei Animation
he worked as an in-between artist and later collaborated with director Isao Takahata. Notable films to which Miyazaki contributed at Toei include Doggie March and Gulliver's Travels Beyond the Moon. He provided key animation to other films at Toei, such as Puss in Boots and Animal Treasure Island, before moving to A-Pro in 1971, where he co-directed Lupin the Third Part I alongside Takahata. After moving to Zuiyō Eizō (later known as Nippon Animation) in 1973, Miyazaki worked as an animator on World Masterpiece Theater, and directed the television series Future Boy Conan. He joined Telecom Animation Film in 1979 to direct his first feature films, The Castle of Cagliostro
The Castle of Cagliostro
in 1979 and Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind in 1984, as well as the television series Sherlock Hound. Miyazaki co-founded Studio Ghibli
Studio Ghibli
in 1985. He directed multiple films with Ghibli, including Castle in the Sky
Castle in the Sky
in 1986, My Neighbor Totoro in 1988, Kiki's Delivery Service
Kiki's Delivery Service
in 1989, and Porco Rosso
Porco Rosso
in 1992. The films were met with commercial and critical success in Japan. Miyazaki's film Princess Mononoke
Princess Mononoke
was the first animated film to win the Japan Academy Prize for Picture of the Year, and briefly became the highest-grossing film in Japan following its release in 1997;[a] its distribution to the Western world
Western world
greatly increased Ghibli's popularity and influence outside Japan. His 2001 film Spirited Away became the highest-grossing film in Japanese history, winning the Academy Award for Best Animated Feature at the 75th Academy Awards
75th Academy Awards
and considered among the greatest films of the decade. Miyazaki's later films—Howl's Moving Castle, Ponyo, and The Wind Rises—also enjoyed critical and commercial success. Following the release of The Wind Rises, Miyazaki announced his retirement from feature films, though he returned to work on a new feature film in 2016. Miyazaki's works are characterized by the recurrence of themes such as humanity's relationship with nature and technology, the wholesomeness of natural and traditional patterns of living, the importance of art and craftsmanship, and the difficulty of maintaining a pacifist ethic in a violent world. The protagonists of his films are often strong girls or young women, and several of his films present morally ambiguous antagonists with redeeming qualities. Miyazaki's works have been highly praised and awarded; he was named a Person of Cultural Merit for outstanding cultural contributions in November 2012, and received the Academy Honorary Award for his impact on animation and cinema in November 2014. In 2002, American film critic Roger Ebert suggested that Miyazaki may be the best animation filmmaker in history, praising the depth and artistry of his films.[2]

Contents

1 Early life 2 Career

2.1 Early career 2.2 Breakthrough films 2.3 Studio Ghibli

2.3.1 Early films (1985–1996) 2.3.2 Global emergence (1997–2008) 2.3.3 Final films (2009–2013) 2.3.4 Focus on short films and manga (2013–present)

3 Personal life 4 Views 5 Themes 6 Creation process and influences 7 Awards and nominations 8 Notes 9 References 10 Sources 11 External links

Early life[edit] Hayao Miyazaki
Hayao Miyazaki
was born on January 5, 1941, in the town of Akebono-cho in Bunkyō, Tokyo, the second of four sons.[3][b] His father, Katsuji Miyazaki (c. 1915 – March 18, 1993),[3] was the director of Miyazaki Airplane, which manufactured rudders for fighter planes during World War II.[4] The business allowed his family to remain affluent during Miyazaki's early life.[5] During the war, when Miyazaki was three years old, his family evacuated to Utsunomiya.[c] After the bombing of Utsunomiya
Utsunomiya
in July 1945, Miyazaki's family evacuated to Kanuma.[3][5] The bombing left a lasting impression on Miyazaki, who was aged four at the time.[5] From 1947 to 1955, Miyazaki's mother suffered from spinal tuberculosis; she spent the first few years in hospital, before being nursed from home.[4] Miyazaki's mother was a strict, intellectual woman.[d] She died in July 1983 at the age of 71.[3] Miyazaki began school in 1947, at an elementary school in Utsunomiya, completing the first through third grades. After his family moved back to Suginami-ku, Miyazaki completed the fourth grade at Ōmiya Elementary School, and fifth grade at Eifuku Elementary School. After graduating from Eifuku, he attended Ōmiya Junior High.[3] He aspired to become a manga artist,[6] but discovered he could not draw people;[3] instead, he only drew planes, tanks, and battleships for several years.[6] Miyazaki was influenced by several manga artists, such as Tetsuji Fukushima, Soji Yamakawa and Osamu Tezuka. Miyazaki destroyed much of his early work, believing it was "bad form" to copy Tezuka's style as it was hindering his own development as an artist.[7][8][9] After graduating from Ōmiya Junior High and Ōmiya Middle School, Miyazaki attended Toyotama High School.[3][10] During his third year, Miyazaki's interest in animation was sparked by Panda and the Magic Serpent (1958).[3] He "fell in love" with the movie's heroine and it left a strong impression on him.[e] After graduating from Toyotama, Miyazaki attended Gakushuin University
Gakushuin University
and was a member of the "Children's Literature Research Club", the "closest thing to a comics club in those days".[3] In his free time, Miyazaki would visit his art teacher from middle school and sketch in his studio, where the two would drink and "talk about politics, life, all sorts of things".[12] Miyazaki graduated from Gakushuin in 1963 with degrees in political science and economics.[3] Career[edit] Main article: Works of Hayao Miyazaki Early career[edit]

Miyazaki first worked with Isao Takahata
Isao Takahata
in 1964, spawning a collaboration which lasted until Takahata's death in 2018.[13][14]

In 1963, Miyazaki was employed at Toei Animation.[13] He worked as an in-between artist on the theatrical feature anime Doggie March and the television anime Wolf Boy Ken (both 1963). He also worked on Gulliver's Travels Beyond the Moon
Gulliver's Travels Beyond the Moon
(1964).[15] He was a leader in a labor dispute soon after his arrival, and became chief secretary of Toei's labor union in 1964.[13] Miyazaki later worked as chief animator, concept artist, and scene designer on The Great Adventure of Horus, Prince of the Sun (1968). Throughout the film's production, Miyazaki worked closely with his mentor, Yasuo Ōtsuka, whose approach to animation had a profound impact on Miyazaki's work.[16] Directed by Isao Takahata, with whom Miyazaki would continue to collaborate for the remainder of his career, the film was highly praised, and deemed a pivotal work in the evolution of animation.[17][18][19] Under the pseudonym Saburō Akitsu (秋津三朗), Miyazaki wrote and illustrated the manga People of the Desert, published in 26 instalments between September 1969 and March 1970 in Boys and Girls Newspaper (少年少女新聞, Shōnen shōjo shinbun).[20] He was influenced by illustrated stories such as Fukushima's Evil Lord of the Desert (沙漠の魔王, Sabaku no maō).[21] Miyazaki also provided key animation for The Wonderful World of Puss 'n Boots (1969), directed by Kimio Yabuki.[22] He created a 12-chapter manga series as a promotional tie-in for the film; the series ran in the Sunday edition of Tokyo
Tokyo
Shimbun from January to March 1969.[23][24] Miyazaki later proposed scenes in the screenplay for Flying Phantom Ship (1961), in which military tanks would cause mass hysteria in downtown Tokyo, and was hired to storyboard and animate the scenes.[25] In 1971, he developed structure, characters and designs for Hiroshi Ikeda's adaptation of Animal Treasure Island; he created the 13-part manga adaptation, printed in Tokyo
Tokyo
Shimbun from January to March 1971.[23][24][26] Miyazaki also provided key animation for Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves.[27] Miyazaki left Toei Animation
Toei Animation
in August 1971, and was hired at A-Pro,[28] where he directed, or co-directed with Takahata, 23 episodes of Lupin the Third Part I.[27] The two also began pre-production on a series based on Astrid Lindgren's Pippi Longstocking books, designing extensive storyboards; the series was canceled after Miyazaki and Takahata met Lindgren, and permission was refused to complete the project.[28] In 1972 and 1973, Miyazaki wrote, designed and animated two Panda! Go, Panda!
Panda! Go, Panda!
shorts, directed by Takahata.[29] After moving from A-Pro to Zuiyō Eizō in June 1973,[30] Miyazaki and Takahata worked on World Masterpiece Theater, which featured their animation series Heidi, Girl of the Alps, an adaptation of Johanna Spyri's Heidi. Zuiyō Eizō continued as Nippon Animation in July 1975.[30] Miyazaki also directed the television series Future Boy Conan
Future Boy Conan
(1978), an adaptation of Alexander Key's The Incredible Tide.[31] Breakthrough films[edit] Miyazaki left Nippon Animation
Nippon Animation
in 1979, during the production of Anne of Green Gables;[32] he provided scene design and organization on the first fifteen episodes.[33] He moved to Telecom Animation Film, a subsidiary of TMS Entertainment, to direct his first feature anime film, The Castle of Cagliostro
The Castle of Cagliostro
(1979), a Lupin III film.[34] In his role at Telecom, Miyazaki helped train the second wave of employees.[31] Miyazaki directed six episodes of Sherlock Hound in 1981, until issues with Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's estate led to a suspension in production; Miyazaki was busy with other projects by the time the issues were resolved, and the remaining episodes were directed by Koysuke Mikuriya. They were broadcast from November 1984 to May 1985.[35] Miyazaki also wrote the graphic novel The Journey of Shuna, inspired by the Tibetan folk tale "Prince who became a dog". The novel was published by Tokuma Shoten
Tokuma Shoten
in June 1983,[36] and dramatised for radio broadcast in 1987.[37] Hayao Miyazaki's Daydream Data Notes was also irregularly published from November 1984 to October 1994 in Model Graphix;[38] selections of the stories received radio broadcast in 1995.[37] After the release of The Castle of Cagliostro, Miyazaki began working on his ideas for an animated film adaptation of Richard Corben's comic book Rowlf and pitched the idea to Yutaka Fujioka at TMS. In November 1980, a proposal was drawn up to acquire the film rights.[39][40] Around that time, Miyazaki was also approached for a series of magazine articles by the editorial staff of Animage. During subsequent conversations, he showed his sketchbooks and discussed basic outlines for envisioned animation projects with editors Toshio Suzuki and Osamu Kameyama, who saw the potential for collaboration on their development into animation. Two projects were proposed: Warring States Demon Castle (戦国魔城, Sengoku ma-jō), to be set in the Sengoku period; and the adaptation of Corben's Rowlf. Both were rejected, as the company was unwilling to fund anime projects not based on existing manga, and the rights for the adaptation of Rowlf could not be secured.[41][42] An agreement was reached that Miyazaki could start developing his sketches and ideas into a manga for the magazine with the proviso that it would never be made into a film.[43][44] The manga—titled Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind—ran from February 1982 to March 1994. The story, as re-printed in the tankōbon volumes, spans seven volumes for a combined total of 1060 pages.[45] Miyazaki drew the episodes primarily in pencil, and it was printed monochrome in sepia toned ink.[46][47][44] Miyazaki resigned from Telecom Animation Film in November 1982.[48]

Miyazaki opened his own personal studio in 1984, named Nibariki.[49]

Following the success of Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind, Yasuyoshi Tokuma, the founder of Tokuma Shoten, encouraged Miyazaki to work on a film adaptation.[50] Miyazaki initially refused, but agreed on the condition that he could direct.[51] Miyazaki's imagination was sparked by the mercury poisoning of Minamata Bay
Minamata Bay
and how nature responded and thrived in a poisoned environment, using it to create the film's polluted world. Miyazaki and Takahata chose the minor studio Topcraft to animate the film, as they believed its artistic talent could transpose the sophisticated atmosphere of the manga to the film.[50] Pre-production began on May 31, 1983; Miyazaki encountered difficulties in creating the screenplay, with only sixteen chapters of the manga to work with.[52] Takahata enlisted experimental and minimalist musician Joe Hisaishi
Joe Hisaishi
to compose the film's score.[53] Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind was released on March 11, 1984. It grossed ¥1.48 billion at the box office, and made an additional ¥742 million in distribution income.[54] It is often seen as Miyazaki's pivotal work, cementing his reputation as an animator.[55][f] It was lauded for its positive portrayal of women, particularly that of main character Nausicaä.[57][58][g] Several critics have labeled Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind as possessing anti-war and feminist themes; Miyazaki argues otherwise, stating that he only wishes to entertain.[60][h] The successful cooperation on the creation of the manga and the film laid the foundation for other collaborative projects.[61] In April 1984, Miyazaki opened his own office in Suginami Ward, naming it Nibariki.[49] Studio Ghibli[edit] Early films (1985–1996)[edit] In June 1985, Miyazaki, Takahata, Tokuma and Suzuki founded the animation production company Studio Ghibli, with funding from Tokuma Shoten. Studio Ghibli's first film, Laputa: Castle in the Sky
Castle in the Sky
(1986), employed the same production crew of Nausicaä. Miyazaki's designs for the film's setting were inspired by Greek architecture and "European urbanistic templates".[62] Some of the architecture in the film was also inspired by a Welsh mining town; Miyazaki witnessed the mining strike upon his first visit to Wales
Wales
in 1984, and admired the miners' dedication to their work and community.[63] Laputa was released on August 2, 1986. It was the highest-grossing animation film of the year in Japan.[62] Miyazaki's following film, My Neighbor Totoro, was released alongside Takahata's Grave of the Fireflies in April 1988 to ensure Studio Ghibli's financial status. The simultaneous production was chaotic for the artists, as they switched between projects.[64][i] My Neighbor Totoro
My Neighbor Totoro
features the theme of the relationship between the environment and humanity—a contrast to Nausicaä, which emphasises technology's negative effect on nature.[65] The film was commercially unsuccessful at the box office, though merchandising was successful, and it received critical acclaim.[66][67] In 1987, Studio Ghibli
Studio Ghibli
acquired the rights to create a film adaptation of Eiko Kadono's novel Kiki's Delivery Service. Miyazaki's work on My Neighbor Totoro prevented him from directing the adaptation; Sunao Katabuchi was chosen as director, and Nobuyuki Isshiki was hired as script writer. Miyazaki's dissatisfaction of Isshiki's first draft led him to make changes to the project, ultimately taking the role of director. Kadono was unhappy with the differences between the book and the screenplay. Miyazaki and Suzuki visited Kadono and invited her to the studio; she allowed the project to continue.[68] The film was originally intended to be a 60-minute special, but expanded into a feature film after Miyazaki completed the storyboards and screenplay.[69] Kiki's Delivery Service
Kiki's Delivery Service
premiered on July 29, 1989. It earned ¥2.15 billion at the box office,[70] and was the highest-grossing film in Japan in 1989.[71] From March to May 1989, Miyazaki's manga Hikōtei Jidai was published in the magazine Model Graphix.[72] Miyazaki began production on a 45 minute in-flight film for Japan Airlines
Japan Airlines
based on the manga; Suzuki ultimately extended the film into the feature-length film, titled Porco Rosso, as expectations grew. Due to the end of production on Takahata's Only Yesterday (1991), Miyazaki initially managed the production of Porco Rosso
Porco Rosso
independently.[73] The outbreak of the Yugoslav Wars
Yugoslav Wars
in 1991 had an impact on Miyazaki, prompting a more sombre tone for the film;[74] Miyazaki would later refer to the film as "foolish", as its mature tones were unsuitable for children.[75] The film featured anti-war themes, which Miyazaki would later revisit.[76][j] The airline remained a major investor in the film, resulting in its initial premiere as an in-flight film, prior to its theatrical release on July 18, 1992.[74] The film was critically and commercially successful,[k] remaining the highest-grossing animated film in Japan for several years.[73][l] Studio Ghibli
Studio Ghibli
set up its headquarters in Koganei, Tokyo
Tokyo
in August 1992.[78] In November 1992, two television spots directed by Miyazaki were broadcast by Nippon Television Network (NTV): Sora Iro no Tane, a 90-second spot loosely based on the illustrated story The Sky Blue Seed by Reiko Nakagawa and Yuriko Omura, and commissioned to celebrate NTV's fortieth anniversary;[79] and Nandarou, aired as one 15-second and four 5-second spots, centered on an undefinable creature which ultimately became NTV's mascot.[80] Miyazaki designed the storyboards and wrote the screenplay for Whisper of the Heart
Whisper of the Heart
(1995), directed by Yoshifumi Kondō.[81][m] Global emergence (1997–2008)[edit] Miyazaki began work on the initial storyboards for Princess Mononoke in August 1994,[82] based on preliminary thoughts and sketches from the late 1970s.[83] While experiencing writer's block during production, Miyazaki accepted a request for the creation of On Your Mark, a music video for the song of the same name by Chage and Aska.[84] In the production of the video, Miyazaki experimented with computer animation to supplement traditional animation, a technique he would soon revisit for Princess Mononoke.[85] On Your Mark premiered as a short before Whisper of the Heart.[86] Despite the video's popularity, Suzuki said that it was not given "100 percent" focus.[87]

Miyazaki used 3D rendering
3D rendering
in Princess Mononoke
Princess Mononoke
(1997) to create writhing "demon flesh" and composite them onto the hand-drawn characters. Approximately five minutes of the film uses similar techniques.[88]

In May 1995, Miyazaki took a group of artists and animators to the ancient forests of Yakushima
Yakushima
and the mountains of Shirakami-Sanchi, taking photographs and making sketches.[89] The landscapes in the film were inspired by Yakushima.[90] In Princess Mononoke, Miyazaki revisited the ecological and political themes of Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind.[91][n] Miyazaki supervised the 144,000 cels in the film, about 80,000 of which were key animation.[92][93] Princess Mononoke was produced with an estimated budget of ¥2.35 billion (approximately US$23.5 million),[94] making it the most expensive film by Studio Ghibli
Studio Ghibli
at the time.[95] Approximately fifteen minutes of the film uses computer animation: about five minutes uses techniques such as 3D rendering, digital composition, and texture mapping; the remaining ten minutes uses digital ink and paint. While the original intention was to digitally paint 5,000 of the film's frames, time constraints doubled this.[88] Upon its premiere on July 12, 1997, Princess Mononoke
Princess Mononoke
was critically acclaimed, becoming the first animated film to win the Japan Academy Prize for Picture of the Year.[96][97] The film was also commercially successful, earning a domestic total of ¥14 billion (US$148 million),[95] and becoming the highest-grossing film in Japan for several months.[1][a] Miramax Films
Miramax Films
purchased the film's distributions rights for North America;[63] it was the first Studio Ghibli production to receive a substantial theatrical distribution in the United States. While it was largely unsuccessful at the box office, grossing about US$3 million,[98] it was seen as the introduction of Studio Ghibli
Studio Ghibli
to global markets.[99][o] Miyazaki claimed that Princess Mononoke would be his final film.[99] Tokuma Shoten
Tokuma Shoten
merged with Studio Ghibli
Studio Ghibli
in June 1997.[78] Miyazaki's next film was conceived while on vacation at a mountain cabin with his family and five young girls who were family friends. Miyazaki realised that he had not created a film for ten-year-old girls, and set out to do so. He read shōjo manga magazines like Nakayoshi
Nakayoshi
and Ribon
Ribon
for inspiration, but felt they only offered subjects on "crushes and romance", which is not what the girls "held dear in their hearts". He decided to produce the film about a female heroine whom they could look up to.[100] Production of the film, titled Spirited Away, commenced in 2000 on a budget of ¥1.9 billion (US$15 million). As with Princess Mononoke, the staff experimented with computer animation, but kept the technology at a level to enhance the story, not to "steal the show".[101] Spirited Away
Spirited Away
deals with symbols of human greed,[102][p] and a liminal journey through the realm of spirits.[103][q] The film was released on July 20, 2001; it received critical acclaim, and is considered among the greatest films of the 2000s.[104] It won the Japan Academy Prize for Picture of the Year,[105] and the Academy Award for Best Animated Feature.[106] The film was also commercially successful, earning ¥30.4 billion (US$289.1 million) at the box office.[107] It is the highest-grossing film in Japan.[108] In September 2001, Studio Ghibli
Studio Ghibli
announced the production of Howl's Moving Castle, based on the novel by Diana Wynne Jones.[109] Mamoru Hosoda of Toei Animation
Toei Animation
was originally selected to direct the film,[110] but disagreements between Hosoda and Studio Ghibli executives led to the project's abandonment.[109] After six months, Studio Ghibli
Studio Ghibli
resurrected the project. Miyazaki was inspired to direct the film upon reading Jones' novel, and was struck by the image of a castle moving around the countryside; the novel does not explain how the castle moved, which led to Miyazaki's designs.[111] He travelled to Colmar
Colmar
and Riquewihr
Riquewihr
in Alsace, France, to study the architecture and the surroundings for the film's setting.[112] Additional inspiration came from the concepts of future technology in Albert Robida's work,[113] as well as the "illusion art" of 19th century Europe.[114][r] The film was produced digitally, but the characters and backgrounds were drawn by hand prior to being digitized.[115] It was released on November 20, 2004, and received widespread critical acclaim. The film received the Osella Award for Technical Excellence at the 61st Venice International Film Festival,[109] and was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Animated Feature.[116] In Japan, the film grossed a record $14.5 million in its first week of release.[111] It remains among the highest-grossing films in Japan, with a worldwide gross of over ¥19.3 billion.[117] Miyazaki received the honorary Golden Lion
Golden Lion
for Lifetime Achievement award at the 62nd Venice International Film Festival in 2005.[109] In March 2005, Studio Ghibli
Studio Ghibli
split from Tokuma Shoten.[118] In the 1980s, Miyazaki contacted Ursula K. Le Guin
Ursula K. Le Guin
expressing interest in producing an adaptation of her Earthsea
Earthsea
novels; unaware of Miyazaki's work, Le Guin declined. Upon watching My Neighbor Totoro
My Neighbor Totoro
several years later, Le Guin expressed approval to the concept of the adaptation. She met with Suzuki in August 2005, who wanted Miyazaki's son Gorō to direct the film, as Miyazaki had wished to retire. Disappointed that Miyazaki was not directing, but under the impression that he would supervise his son's work, Le Guin approved of the film's production.[119] Miyazaki later publicly opposed and criticized Gorō's appointment as director.[120] Upon Miyazaki's viewing of the film, he wrote a message for his son: "It was made honestly, so it was good".[121] Miyazaki designed the covers for several manga novels in 2006, including A Trip to Tynemouth; he also worked as editor, and created a short manga for the book.[122] Miyazaki's next film, Ponyo, began production in May 2006.[123] It was initially inspired by "The Little Mermaid" by Hans Christian Andersen, though began to take its own form as production continued.[124] Miyazaki aimed for the film to celebrate the innocence and cheerfulness of a child's universe. He intended for it to only use traditional animation,[123] and was intimately involved with the artwork. He preferred to draw the sea and waves himself, as he enjoyed experimenting.[125] Ponyo
Ponyo
features 170,000 frames—a record for Miyazaki.[126] The film's seaside village was inspired by Tomonoura, a town in Setonaikai National Park, where Miyazaki stayed in 2005.[127] The main character is based on Gorō.[128] Following its release on July 19, 2008, Ponyo
Ponyo
was critically acclaimed, receiving Animation of the Year at the 32nd Japan Academy Prize.[129] The film was also a commercial success, earning ¥10 billion (US$93.2 million) in its first month[128] and ¥15.5 billion by the end of 2008, placing it among the highest-grossing films in Japan.[130] Final films (2009–2013)[edit]

Miyazaki at the 2009 San Diego Comic-Con.

In early 2009, Miyazaki began writing a manga called Kaze Tachinu (風立ちぬ, The Wind Rises), telling the story of Mitsubishi A6M Zero fighter designer Jiro Horikoshi. The manga was first published in two issues of the Model Graphix magazine, published on February 25 and March 25, 2009.[131] Miyazaki later co-wrote the screenplay for Arrietty
Arrietty
(2010) and From Up on Poppy Hill, directed by Hiromasa Yonebayashi and Gorō Miyazaki, respectively.[132] Miyazaki wanted his next film to be a sequel to Ponyo, but Suzuki convinced him to instead adapt Kaze Tachinu to film.[133] In November 2012, Studio Ghibli announced the production of The Wind Rises, based on Kaze Tachinu, to be released alongside Takahata's The Tale of the Princess Kaguya.[134] Miyazaki was inspired to create The Wind Rises after reading a quote from Horikoshi: "All I wanted to do was to make something beautiful".[135] Several scenes in The Wind Rises were inspired by Tatsuo Hori's novel The Wind Has Risen (風立ちぬ), in which Hori wrote about his life experiences with his fiancée before she died from tuberculosis. The female lead character's name, Naoko Satomi, was borrowed from Hori's novel Naoko (菜穂子).[136] The Wind Rises continues to reflect Miyazaki's pacifist stance,[135] continuing the themes of his earlier works, despite stating that condemning war was not the intention of the film.[137][s] The film premiered on July 20, 2013,[135] and received critical acclaim; it was named Animation of the Year at the 37th Japan Academy Prize,[138] and was nominated for Best Animated Feature at the 86th Academy Awards.[139] It was also commercially successful, grossing ¥11.6 billion (US$110 million) at the Japanese box office, becoming the highest-grossing film in Japan in 2013.[140] Focus on short films and manga (2013–present)[edit] In September 2013, Miyazaki announced that he was retiring from the production of feature films due to his age, but wished to continue working on the displays at the Studio Ghibli
Studio Ghibli
Museum.[141][142] Miyazaki was awarded the Academy Honorary Award at the Governors Awards in November 2014.[143] He developed Boro the Caterpillar, a computer-animated short film which was first discussed during pre-production for Princess Mononoke.[144] It was screened exclusively at the Studio Ghibli
Studio Ghibli
Museum in July 2017.[145] He is also working on an untitled samurai manga.[146] In August 2016, Miyazaki proposed a new feature-length film, titled How Do You Live?. He began animation work on the project without receiving official approval. He hopes to complete the film by 2019, though Suzuki predicts a 2020–2021 release.[145] Personal life[edit] Miyazaki married fellow animator Akemi Ota in October 1965. The couple have two sons: Gorō, born in January 1967, and Keisuke, born in April 1969.[20] Miyazaki's dedication to his work negatively impacted his relationship with Gorō, as he was often absent. Gorō watched his father's works in an attempt to "understand" him, since the two rarely talked. During the production of Tales from Earthsea
Earthsea
in 2006, Gorō said that his father "gets zero marks as a father but full marks as a director of animated films".[147][t] Views[edit]

"If you don't spend time watching real people, you can't do this, because you've never seen it. Some people spend their lives interested only in themselves. Almost all Japanese animation is produced with hardly any basis taken from observing real people ... It's produced by humans who can't stand looking at other humans. And that's why the industry is full of otaku!"

Hayao Miyazaki, television interview, January 2014[148]

Miyazaki has often criticized the current state of the anime industry, stating that animators are unrealistic when creating people. He has stated that anime is "produced by humans who can't stand looking at other humans ... that's why the industry is full of otaku!".[148] He has also frequently criticized otaku, including "gun otaku" and "Zero fanatics", declaring it a "fetish", and refusing to identify himself as such.[149][150] In 2013, several Studio Ghibli
Studio Ghibli
staff members, including Miyazaki, criticized Japanese Prime Minister Shinzō Abe's policies, and the proposed Constitutional amendment that would allow Abe to revise the clause which outlaws war as a means to settle international disputes.[u] Miyazaki felt that Abe wished to "leave his name in history as a great man who revised the Constitution and its interpretation", describing it as "despicable".[152][v] Miyazaki has expressed his disapproval of Abe's denial of Japan's military aggression, stating that Japan "should clearly say that [they] inflicted enormous damage on China and express deep remorse over it".[152] He also felt that the country's government should give a "proper apology" to Korean comfort women who serviced the Japanese army during World War II, suggesting that the Senkaku Islands
Senkaku Islands
should be "split in half" or controlled by both Japan and China. After the release of The Wind Rises in 2013, some online critics labeled Miyazaki a "traitor" and "anti-Japanese", describing the film as overly "left-wing".[76] Miyazaki refused to attend the 75th Academy Awards
75th Academy Awards
in Hollywood, Los Angeles in 2003, in protest of the United States' involvement in the Iraq War, later stating that he "didn't want to visit a country that was bombing Iraq".[154] He did not publicly express this opinion at the request of his producer until 2009, when he lifted his boycott and attended San Diego Comic Con International
San Diego Comic Con International
as a favor to his friend John Lasseter.[154] Miyazaki also expressed his opinion about the terrorist attack at the offices of the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, criticizing the magazine's decision to publish the content cited as the trigger for the incident.[155][w] Themes[edit] Miyazaki's works are characterized by the recurrence of themes such as environmentalism, pacifism, feminism, love and family.[156] His narratives are also notable for not pitting a hero against an unsympathetic antagonist.[157][158][159][x] Miyazaki's films often emphasize environmentalism and the Earth's fragility. Margaret Talbot stated that Miyazaki dislikes modern technology, and believes much of modern culture is "thin and shallow and fake"; he anticipates a time with "no more high-rises".[161][y] Miyazaki felt frustrated growing up in the Shōwa period
Shōwa period
from 1955–65 because "nature — the mountains and rivers — was being destroyed in the name of economic progress".[162] Peter Schellhase of The Imaginative Conservative identified that several antagonists of Miyazaki's films "attempt to dominate nature in pursuit of political domination, and are ultimately destructive to both nature and human civilization".[156][z] Miyazaki is critical of capitalism, globalization, and their impacts on modern life. He believes that "a company is common property of the people that work there".[163] Several of Miyazaki's films feature anti-war themes. Daisuke Akimoto of Animation Studies categorized Porco Rosso
Porco Rosso
as "anti-war propaganda";[j] he felt that the main character, Porco, transforms into a pig partly due to his extreme distaste of militarism.[77][aa] Akimoto also argues that The Wind Rises reflects Miyazaki's "antiwar pacifism", despite the latter stating that the film does not attempt to "denounce" war.[164] Schellhase also identifies Princess Mononoke as a pacifist film due to the protagonist, Ashitaka; instead of joining the campaign of revenge against humankind, as his ethnic history would lead him to do, Ashitaka strives for peace.[156] David Loy and Linda Goodhew argue that both Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind and Princess Mononoke
Princess Mononoke
do not depict traditional evil, but the Buddhist
Buddhist
roots of evil: greed, ill will, and delusion; according to Buddhism, the roots of evil must transform into "generosity, loving-kindness and wisdom" in order to overcome suffering, and both Nausicaä and Ashitaka accomplish this.[165] When characters in Miyazaki's films are forced to engage in violence, it is shown as being a difficult task; in Howl's Moving Castle, Howl is forced to fight an inescapable battle in defense of those he loves, and it almost destroys him, though he is ultimately saved by Sophie's love and bravery.[156] Suzuki described Miyazaki as a feminist in reference to his attitude to female workers.[166][ab] Miyazaki has described his female characters as "brave, self-sufficient girls that don't think twice about fighting for what they believe in with all their heart", stating that they may "need a friend, or a supporter, but never a saviour" and that "any woman is just as capable of being a hero as any man".[167] Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind was lauded for its positive portrayal of women, particularly the protagonist Nausicaä.[57][g] Schellhase noted that the female characters in Miyazaki's films are not objectified or sexualized, and possess complex and individual characteristics absent from Hollywood productions.[156][ac] Schellhase also identified a "coming of age" element for the heroines in Miyazaki's films, as they each discover "individual personality and strengths".[156][ad] Gabrielle Bellot of The Atlantic
The Atlantic
wrote that, in his films, Miyazaki "shows a keen understanding of the complexities of what it might mean to be a woman". In particular, Bellot cites Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind, praising the film's challenging of gender expectations, and the strong and independent nature of Nausicaä. Bellot also noted that Princess Mononoke's San represents the "conflict between selfhood and expression".[168] Miyazaki is concerned with the sense of wonder in young people, seeking to maintain themes of love and family in his films.[156][ae] Michael Toscano of Curator found that Miyazaki "fears Japanese children are dimmed by a culture of overconsumption, overprotection, utilitarian education, careerism, techno-industrialism, and a secularism that is swallowing Japan’s native animism".[169] Schellhase wrote that several of Miyazaki's works feature themes of love and romance, but felt that emphasis is placed on "the way lonely and vulnerable individuals are integrated into relationships of mutual reliance and responsibility, which generally benefit everyone around them".[156] He also found that many of the protagonists in Miyazaki's films present an idealized image of families, whereas others are dysfunctional.[156][af] He felt that the non-biological family in Howl's Moving Castle
Howl's Moving Castle
(consisting of Howl, Sophie, Markl, the Witch of the Waste, and Heen) gives a message of hope: that those cast out by society can "find a healthy place to belong".[156] Creation process and influences[edit] Miyazaki forgoes traditional screenplays in his productions, instead developing the film's narrative as he designs the storyboards. "We never know where the story will go but we just keep working on the film as it develops," he said.[170] In each of his films, Miyazaki has employed traditional animation methods, drawing each frame by hand; computer-generated imagery has been employed in several of his later films, beginning with Princess Mononoke, to "enrich the visual look",[2] though he ensures that each film can "retain the right ratio between working by hand and computer ... and still be able to call my films 2D".[171] He oversees every frame of his films.[172] Miyazaki has cited several Japanese artists as his influences, including Sanpei Shirato,[6] Osamu Tezuka, and Soji Yamakawa.[8] A number of Western authors have also influenced his works, including Frédéric Back,[170] Lewis Carroll,[171] Roald Dahl,[173] Jean Giraud,[174][ag] Paul Grimault,[170] Ursula K. Le Guin,[176] and Yuriy Norshteyn, as well as animation studio Aardman Animations.[177][ah] Specific works that have influenced Miyazaki include Animal Farm (1945),[171] The Snow Queen (1957),[170] and The King and the Mockingbird (1980).[171] When animating young children, Miyazaki often takes inspiration from his friends' children, as well as memories of his own childhood.[179] Miyazaki has frequently been cited as an inspiration to several animators, directors and writers, including Guillermo del Toro,[180] Pete Docter,[181] Glen Keane,[182] John Lasseter,[183] Shigeru Miyamoto,[184] Hironobu Sakaguchi,[185] as well as the animated series Avatar: The Last Airbender[186] and the video game Ori and the Blind Forest
Ori and the Blind Forest
(2015).[187] Awards and nominations[edit] Main article: List of accolades received by Hayao Miyazaki Miyazaki won the Ōfuji Noburō Award at the Mainichi Film Awards for The Castle of Cagliostro
The Castle of Cagliostro
(1979),[188] Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind (1984), Laputa: Castle in the Sky
Castle in the Sky
(1986),[189] and My Neighbor Totoro (1988),[188] and the Mainichi Film Award for Best Animation Film for Kiki's Delivery Service
Kiki's Delivery Service
(1989),[190] Porco Rosso
Porco Rosso
(1992),[188] Princess Mononoke
Princess Mononoke
(1997),[190] Spirited Away[191] and Whale Hunt (both 2001).[188] Spirited Away
Spirited Away
was also awarded the Academy Award for Best Animated Feature,[105] while Howl's Moving Castle
Howl's Moving Castle
(2004) and The Wind Rises (2013) received nominations.[116][139] He was named a Person of Cultural Merit by the Japanese government in November 2012, for outstanding cultural contributions.[192] His other accolades include eight Tokyo
Tokyo
Anime
Anime
Awards,[193][194] eight Kinema Junpo Awards,[189][190][195][196] six Japan Academy Awards,[97][101][129][138][189][190] five Annie Awards,[190][197][198] and three awards from the Anime
Anime
Grand Prix[189][190] and the Venice Film Festival.[109][199] Notes[edit]

^ a b Princess Mononoke
Princess Mononoke
was eclipsed as the highest-grossing film in Japan by Titanic, released several months later.[1] ^ Miyazaki's brothers are: Arata (born July 1939), Yutaka (born January 1944), and Shirou.[3] ^ McCarthy (1999) states Miyazaki was evacuated at age three and began school as an evacuee in 1947.[4] Nausicaa.net
Nausicaa.net
(1994) references the evacuation as "[b]etween 1944 and 1946".[3] ^ Miyazaki's brother Shirou felt that Captain Dola from Laputa: Castle in the Sky reminded him of their mother, "not by her outlook, but by her mentality".[3] ^ McCarthy (1999) states: "He realized the folly of trying to succeed as manga writer by echoing what was fashionable, and decided to follow his true feelings in his work even if that might seem foolish."[11] ^ Cavallaro (2006) states: "Nausicaä constitutes an unprecedented accomplishment in the world of Japanese animation — and one to which any contemporary Miyazaki aficionado ought to remain grateful given that it is precisely on the strength of its performance that Studio Ghibli was founded."[56] ^ a b Napier (1998) states: "Nausicaä ... possesses elements of the self-sacrificing sexlessness of [Mai, the Psychic Girl's] Mai, but combines them with an active and resolute personality to create a remarkably powerful and yet fundamentally feminine heroine."[59] ^ Quoting Miyazaki, McCarthy (1999) states: "I don't make movies with the intention of presenting any messages to humanity. My main aim in a movie is to make the audience come away from it happy."[60] ^ Producer Toshio Suzuki stated: "The process of making these films at the same time in a single studio was sheer chaos. The studio's philosophy of not sacrificing quality was to be strictly maintained, so the task at hand seemed almost impossible. At the same time, nobody in the studio wanted to pass up the chance to make both of these films."[64] ^ a b Akimoto (2014) states: " Porco Rosso
Porco Rosso
(1992) can be categorized as 'anti-war propaganda' ... the film conveys the important memory of war, especially the interwar era and the post-Cold War world."[77] ^ Miyazaki was surprised by the success of Porco Rosso, as he considered it "too idiosyncratic for a toddlers-to-old-folks general audience".[73] ^ Porco Rosso
Porco Rosso
was succeeded as the highest-grossing animated film in Japan by Miyazaki's Princess Mononoke
Princess Mononoke
in 1997.[73] ^ Cavallaro (2006) states: "[Kondō's] association with Miyazaki and Takahata dated back to their days together at A-Pro ... He would also have been Miyazaki's most likely successor had he not tragically passed away in 1998 at the age of 47, victim of an aneurysm."[81] ^ McCarthy (1999) states: "From the Utopian idealism of Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind, Miyazaki's vision has developed to encompass the mature and kindly humanism of Princess Mononoke."[91] ^ Tasker (2011) states: " Princess Mononoke
Princess Mononoke
marked a turning point in Miyazaki's career not merely because it broke Japanese box office records, but also because it, arguably, marked the emergence (through a distribution deal with Disney) into the global animation markets."[99] ^ Regarding a letter written by Studio Ghibli
Studio Ghibli
which paraphrases Miyazaki, Gold (2016) states: "Chihiro's parents turning into pigs symbolizes how some humans become greedy ... There were people that 'turned into pigs' during Japan's bubble economy of the 1980s, and these people still haven't realized they've become pigs."[102] ^ Protagonist Chihiro stands outside societal boundaries in the supernatural setting. The use of the word kamikakushi (literally "hidden by gods") within the Japanese title reinforces this symbol. Reider (2005) states: "Kamikakushi is a verdict of 'social death' in this world, and coming back to this world from Kamikakushi meant 'social resurrection'."[103] ^ Quoting producer Toshio Suzuki, Cavallaro (2015) states: "[Miyazaki] is said to feel instinctively drawn back to the sorts of artists who 'drew "illusion art" in Europe back then... They drew many pictures imagining what the 20th century would look like. They were illusions and were never realized at all.' What Miyazaki recognizes in these images is their unique capacity to evoke 'a world in which science exists as well as magic, since they are illusion'."[114] ^ Foundas (2013) states: " The Wind Rises continues the strong pacifist themes of [Miyazaki's] earlier Nausicaä and Princess Mononoke, marveling at man's appetite for destruction and the speed with which new technologies become weaponized."[137] ^ Original text: "私にとって、宮崎駿は、父としては0点でも、アニメーション映画監督としては満点なのです。" ^ Abe's party proposed the amendment to Article 96 of the Constitution of Japan, a clause that stipulates procedures needed for revisions. Ultimately, this would allow Abe to revise Article 9 of the Constitution, which outlaws war as a means to settle international disputes.[151] ^ Miyazaki stated: "It goes without saying that I am against constitutional reform ... I'm taken aback by the lack of knowledge among government and political party leaders on historical facts. People who don't think enough shouldn't meddle with the constitution."[153] ^ Miyazaki stated: "I think it's a mistake to caricature the figures venerated by another culture. You shouldn't do it ... Instead of doing something like that, you should make caricatures of your own country's politicians."[155] ^ Regarding Spirited Away, Miyazaki (2002) states: "the heroine [is] thrown into a place where the good and bad dwell together. [...] She manages not because she has destroyed the 'evil', but because she has acquired the ability to survive."[160] ^ In Cappello (2005), Talbot states: "[Miyazaki's] said, not entirely jokingly, that he looks forward to the time when Tokyo
Tokyo
is submerged by the ocean and the NTV tower becomes an island, when the human population plummets and there are no more high-rises."[161] ^ Schellhase (2014) states: "Most of the few true villains in Mr. Miyazaki's films are exploiters: the Tolmeckians in Nausicaä who want to revive an incredibly destructive giant warrior; the shadowy Prince Muska in Laputa: Castle in the Sky, who hopes to harness the power of a flying city for world domination; or Madam Suliman in Howl’s Moving Castle, a sorceress who attempts to bring all the magicians in the land under her control and turn them into monsters of war."[156] ^ Akimoto (2014) states: "Porco became a pig because he hates the following three factors: man (egoism), the state (nationalism) and war (militarism)."[77] ^ In The Birth of Studio Ghibli
Studio Ghibli
(2005), Suzuki states: "Miyazaki is a feminist, actually. He also has this conviction that to be successful, companies have to make it possible for their female employees to succeed too. You can see this attitude in Princess Mononoke: all the characters working the bellows in the iron works are women. Then there's Porco Rosso: Porco's plane is rebuilt entirely by women."[166] ^ Schellhase (2014) states: "Miyazaki's female characters are not objectified or overly sexualized. They are as complex and independent as his male characters, or even more so. Male and female characters alike are unique individuals, with specific quirks and even inconsistencies, like real people. They are also recognizably masculine and feminine, yet are not compelled to exist within to narrowly-defined gender roles. Sexuality is not as important as personality and relationships. If this is feminism, Hollywood needs much, much more of it."[156] ^ Schellhase (2014) states: "Princess Nausicäa, already a leader, successfully overcomes an extreme political and ecological crisis to save her people and become queen. Kiki's tale is distinctly framed as a rite of passage in which the young 'witch in training' establishes herself in an unfamiliar town, experiencing the joys and trials of human interdependence. In Spirited Away, Chihiro must work hard and overcome difficulties to redeem her bestial parents. Howl's heroine Sophie is already an 'old soul,' but a jealous witch’s curse sends her on an unexpected journey in which she and Howl both learn to shoulder the burden of love and responsibility. Umi, the heroine of Poppy Hill, is also very mature and responsible at the beginning of the film, but in the course of the story she grows in self-understanding and is able to deal with grief over the loss of her father."[156] ^ Schellhase (2014) states: "Miyazaki is especially concerned about the way Japan’s young people have lost their sense of wonder from living in a completely disenchanted, materialistic world."[156] ^ Schellhase (2014) states: "Many of [Miyazaki's] young protagonists lack one or both parents. Some parents are bad role models, like Chihiro's materialistic glutton parents, or Sophie's shallow fashion-plate mother. Some families are just dysfunctional, like the sky pirates in Laputa, sons hanging on Dola's matriarchal apron-strings while Dad spends all his time secluded in the engine room. But there are also realistic, stable families with diligent and committed fathers and wise, caring mothers, as in Totoro, Ponyo, and Poppy Hill."[156] ^ Miyazaki and Giraud (also known as Moebius) influenced each other's works, and became friends as a result of their mutual admiration.[174] Monnaie de Paris
Monnaie de Paris
held an exhibition of their work titled Miyazaki et Moebius: Deux Artistes Dont Les Dessins Prennent Vie (Two Artists’s Drawings Taking on a Life of Their Own) from December 2004 to April 2005; both artists attended the opening of the exhibition.[175] ^ An exhibit based upon Aardman Animations' works ran at the Ghibli Museum from 2006–07.[177] Aardman Animations
Aardman Animations
founders Peter Lord
Peter Lord
and David Sproxton
David Sproxton
visited the exhibition in May 2006, where they also met Miyazaki.[178]

References[edit]

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Nausicaa.net
1994. ^ a b c McCarthy 1999, p. 26. ^ a b c Miyazaki 1988. ^ a b c McCarthy 1999, p. 27. ^ Miyazaki 1996, p. 193. ^ a b McCarthy 1999, p. 28. ^ Comic Box 1982, p. 80. ^ Miyazaki 1996, p. 436. ^ McCarthy 1999, p. 29. ^ Miyazaki 1996, p. 200. ^ a b c McCarthy 1999, p. 30. ^ D'Anastasio 2018. ^ McCarthy 1999, p. 217. ^ LaMarre 2009, pp. 56ff. ^ McCarthy 1999, p. 38. ^ Anime
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Ori and the Blind Forest
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External links[edit]

Find more aboutHayao Miyazakiat's sister projects

Media from Wikimedia Commons Quotations from Wikiquote Data from Wikidata

Studio Ghibli
Studio Ghibli
(in Japanese) Hayao Miyazaki
Hayao Miyazaki
at Anime
Anime
News Network's encyclopedia Hayao Miyazaki
Hayao Miyazaki
on IMDb Hayao Miyazaki
Hayao Miyazaki
at Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Authorities, with 14 catalogue records

Awards and achievements

Preceded by Aron Warner for Shrek Academy Award for Best Animated Feature 2002 for Spirited Away Succeeded by Andrew Stanton for Finding Nemo

Preceded by Patrice Chéreau for Intimacy Golden Bear 2002 for Spirited Away Succeeded by Michael Winterbottom for In This World

Preceded by Stanley Donen, Manoel de Oliveira Career Golden Lion 2005 Succeeded by David Lynch

v t e

Works of Hayao Miyazaki

Films directed and written

Feature

The Castle of Cagliostro
The Castle of Cagliostro
(1979) Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind (1984) Castle in the Sky
Castle in the Sky
(1986) My Neighbor Totoro
My Neighbor Totoro
(1988) Kiki's Delivery Service
Kiki's Delivery Service
(1989) Porco Rosso
Porco Rosso
(1992) Princess Mononoke
Princess Mononoke
(1997) Spirited Away
Spirited Away
(2001) Howl's Moving Castle
Howl's Moving Castle
(2004) Ponyo
Ponyo
(2008) The Wind Rises (2013) How Do You Live? (TBA)

Short

On Your Mark (1995) Kujiratori
Kujiratori
(2001) Koro no Daisanpo (2002) Imaginary Flying Machines (2002) Looking for a Home (2006) Hoshi o Katta Hi
Hoshi o Katta Hi
(2006) Mizugumo Monmon
Mizugumo Monmon
(2006) Pandane to Tamago Hime
Pandane to Tamago Hime
(2010)

Films written

Panda! Go, Panda!
Panda! Go, Panda!
(1972) Whisper of the Heart
Whisper of the Heart
(1995) Arrietty
Arrietty
(2010) From Up on Poppy Hill
From Up on Poppy Hill
(2011)

TV directed and/or written

Lupin the Third Part I (1971–1972) Future Boy Conan
Future Boy Conan
(1978) Lupin the Third Part II
Lupin the Third Part II
(1980) Sherlock Hound (1984–1985) Nadia: The Secret of Blue Water (1990–1991)

Manga

The Wonderful World of Puss 'n Boots Sabaku no Tami Animal Treasure Island Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind The Journey of Shuna Hikōtei Jidai Hayao Miyazaki's Daydream Data Notes The Wind Rises

v t e

Studio Ghibli

People

Founders

Hayao Miyazaki Toshio Suzuki Isao Takahata

Others

Joe Hisaishi Katsuya Kondō Yoshifumi Kondō Kitarō Kōsaka Gorō Miyazaki Yoshiaki Nishimura Kazuo Oga Yasuo Ōtsuka Yoshinori Kanada Hiromasa Yonebayashi

Films

Feature films

Castle in the Sky My Neighbor Totoro Grave of the Fireflies Kiki's Delivery Service Only Yesterday Porco Rosso Ocean Waves Pom Poko Whisper of the Heart Princess Mononoke My Neighbors the Yamadas Spirited Away The Cat Returns Howl's Moving Castle Tales from Earthsea Ponyo Arrietty From Up on Poppy Hill The Wind Rises The Tale of the Princess Kaguya When Marnie Was There How Do You Live?

Short films

Nandarō On Your Mark Ghiblies Ghiblies Episode 2 Imaginary Flying Machines The Whale Hunt Koro's Big Day Out Mei and the Kittenbus Looking for a Home The Day I Harvested a Planet The Night of Taneyamagahara Water Spider Monmon Iblard Jikan A Sumo Wrestler's Tail Mr. Dough and the Egg Princess

Video Games

Jade Cocoon: Story of the Tamamayu Jade Cocoon
Jade Cocoon
2 Magic Pengel: The Quest for Color Ni no Kuni

Dominion of the Dark Djinn Wrath of the White Witch

Other productions

Shiki-Jitsu (Studio Kajino) Ghost in the Shell 2: Innocence Ronja, the Robber's Daughter The Red Turtle

Related articles

Catbus Ghibli Museum Ghibli Museum
Ghibli Museum
Library The Kingdom of Dreams and Madness Mary and the Witch's Flower Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind Nausicaa.net Studio Kajino Studio Ponoc Susuwatari Topcraft

Book Category Portal Works

v t e

World Masterpiece Theater
World Masterpiece Theater
by Nippon Animation

Calpis
Calpis
Comic Theater

Dororo
Dororo
(1969) Moomin (1970) Andersen Monogatari (1971) New Moomin
New Moomin
(1972) Fables of the Green Forest
Fables of the Green Forest
(1973) Heidi, Girl of the Alps
Heidi, Girl of the Alps
(1974)

Calpis
Calpis
Children's Theater

Dog of Flanders (1975) Marco, 3000 Leagues in Search of Mother
3000 Leagues in Search of Mother
(1976) Rascal the Raccoon
Rascal the Raccoon
(1977)

Calpis
Calpis
Family
Family
Theater

The Story of Perrine
The Story of Perrine
(1978)

World Masterpiece Theater

Anne of Green Gables (1979) The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1980) The Swiss Family
Family
Robinson: Flone of the Mysterious Island (1981) Lucy-May of the Southern Rainbow
Lucy-May of the Southern Rainbow
(1982) Story of the Alps: My Annette (1983) Katri, Girl of the Meadows
Katri, Girl of the Meadows
(1984) Princess Sarah
Princess Sarah
(1985)

House Foods World Masterpiece Theater

The Story of Pollyanna, Girl of Love
Love
(1986) Tales of Little Women
Tales of Little Women
(1987) Little Lord Fauntleroy (1988) The Adventures of Peter Pan
The Adventures of Peter Pan
(1989) My Daddy Long Legs
My Daddy Long Legs
(1990) Trapp Family
Family
Story (1991) The Bush Baby
The Bush Baby
(1992) Little Women II: Jo's Boys (1993)

World Masterpiece Theater

Tico of the Seven Seas
Tico of the Seven Seas
(1994) Romeo's Blue Skies
Romeo's Blue Skies
(1995) Famous Dog Lassie
Famous Dog Lassie
(1996) Remi, Nobody's Girl
Remi, Nobody's Girl
(1997)

House Foods World Masterpiece Theater

Les Misérables: Shōjo Cosette (2007) Porphy no Nagai Tabi (2008) Kon'nichiwa Anne: Before Green Gables (2009)

Related articles

Nippon Animation Hayao Miyazaki Isao Takahata

Category

v t e

Nippon Animation

Television series

1970s

Fables of the Green Forest
Fables of the Green Forest
(1973) Heidi, Girl of the Alps
Heidi, Girl of the Alps
(1974) Vicky the Viking
Vicky the Viking
(1974–1975) Dog of Flanders (1975) Maya the Honey Bee
Maya the Honey Bee
(1975–1976) Arabian Nights: Sinbad's Adventures (1975–1976) Laura, the Prairie Girl (1975–1982) 3000 Leagues in Search of Mother
3000 Leagues in Search of Mother
(1976) Piccolino no Bōken
Piccolino no Bōken
(1976–1977) Blocker Gundan 4 Machine Blaster
Blocker Gundan 4 Machine Blaster
(1976–1977) Little Lulu and Her Little Friends
Little Lulu and Her Little Friends
(1976–1977) Dokaben
Dokaben
(1976–1979) Rascal the Raccoon
Rascal the Raccoon
(1977) Attack on Tomorrow
Attack on Tomorrow
(1977) Chōgattai Majutsu Robo Ginguiser (1977) Monarch: The Big Bear of Tallac (1977) Ore wa Teppei (1977–1978) Wakakusa no Charlotte
Wakakusa no Charlotte
(1977–1978) Angie Girl
Angie Girl
(1977–1978) Yakyū-kyō no Uta
Yakyū-kyō no Uta
(1977–1979) The Story of Perrine
The Story of Perrine
(1978) Future Boy Conan
Future Boy Conan
(1978) Highschool Baseball Ninja (1978) Haikara-san ga Tōru
Haikara-san ga Tōru
(1978–1979) Anne of Green Gables (1979) Bannertail: The Story of Gray Squirrel (1979) The New Adventures of Maya the Bee (1979–1980) Misha the Little Bear (1979–1980)

1980s

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1980) Tsurikichi Sanpei (1980–1982) The Swiss Family
Family
Robinson: Flone of the Mysterious Island (1981) Ai no Gakko Cuore Monogatari
Ai no Gakko Cuore Monogatari
(1981) Fūsen no Doratarō (1981) Dogtanian and the Three Muskehounds
Dogtanian and the Three Muskehounds
(1981–1982) Lucy-May of the Southern Rainbow
Lucy-May of the Southern Rainbow
(1982) Story of the Alps: My Annette (1983) Around the World with Willy Fog
Around the World with Willy Fog
(1983) Fushigi no Kuni no Alice
Fushigi no Kuni no Alice
(1983–1984) Mīmu Iro Iro Yume no Tabi
Mīmu Iro Iro Yume no Tabi
(1983–1985) Manga
Manga
Aesop Monogatari (1983) Katri, Girl of the Meadows
Katri, Girl of the Meadows
(1984) Ruy the Little Cid (1984) Noozles
Noozles
(1984) Princess Sarah
Princess Sarah
(1985) Bumpety Boo (1985–1986) Uchūsen Sagittarius
Uchūsen Sagittarius
(1986–1987) The Story of Pollyanna, Girl of Love
Love
(1986) Animated Classics of Japanese Literature
Animated Classics of Japanese Literature
(1986) Bosco Adventure
Bosco Adventure
(1986–1987) Tales of Little Women
Tales of Little Women
(1987) Grimm's Fairy Tale Classics
Grimm's Fairy Tale Classics
(1987–1988) Little Lord Fauntleroy (1988) Dagon in the Land of Weeds (1988) Topo Gigio (1988) New Grimm's Fairy Tale Classics
Grimm's Fairy Tale Classics
(1988–1989) Yume Miru Topo Gigio (1988) The Adventures of Peter Pan
The Adventures of Peter Pan
(1989) Jungle Book
Book
Shōnen Mowgli (1989–1990)

1990s

Chibi Maruko-chan
Chibi Maruko-chan
(1990–1992) My Daddy Long Legs
My Daddy Long Legs
(1990) Pygmalio (1990–1991) Trapp Family
Family
Story (1991) Moero! Top Striker
Moero! Top Striker
(1991–1992) The Bush Baby
The Bush Baby
(1992) Nangoku Shōnen Papuwa-kun (1992–1993) Jeanie with the Light Brown Hair (1992–1993) Mikan Enikki (1992–1993) Boukensha: The Man was from Spain (1992–1993) Little Women II: Jo's Boys (1993) Muka Muka Paradise (1993–1994) Bow Wow (1993–1994) Tico of the Seven Seas
Tico of the Seven Seas
(1994) Yamato Takeru (1994) Tonde Burin
Tonde Burin
(1994–1995) Magical Circle Guru Guru
Magical Circle Guru Guru
(1994–1995) Chibi Maruko-chan
Chibi Maruko-chan
(1995–present) Romeo's Blue Skies
Romeo's Blue Skies
(1995) Mama Loves the Poyopoyo-Saurus
Mama Loves the Poyopoyo-Saurus
(1995–1996) Famous Dog Lassie
Famous Dog Lassie
(1996) Remi, Nobody's Girl
Remi, Nobody's Girl
(1996–1997) Grander Musashi (1997) Chūka Ichiban!
Chūka Ichiban!
(1997–1998) Coji-Coji
Coji-Coji
(1997–1999) Grander Musashi RV (1998) Hanasaka Tenshi Ten-Ten-kun (1998–1999) Corrector Yui
Corrector Yui
(1999–2000) Shūkan Storyland (1999–2001) Future Boy Conan
Future Boy Conan
II: Taiga Adventure (1999–2000) Hunter × Hunter
Hunter × Hunter
(1999–2001)

2000s

Doki Doki Densetsu Mahōjin Guru Guru (2000) Marcelino Pan y Vino (2000) Cosmic Baton Girl Princess Comet
Princess Comet
(2001–2002) The Legend of Condor Hero
The Legend of Condor Hero
(2001–2002) Beyblade
Beyblade
V-Force (2002) Hungry Heart: Wild Striker (2002–2003) Beyblade
Beyblade
G-Revolution (2003) Papuwa (2003–2004) Battle B-Daman
Battle B-Daman
(2004) Sore Ike! Zukkoke Sannin-gumi (2004) Fantastic Children
Fantastic Children
(2004–2005) Battle B-Daman: Fire Spirits! (2005) Crash B-Daman (2006) Poka Poka Mori no Rascal (2006–2007) The Wallflower (2006–2007) Ukkari Pénélope (2006) Les Misérables: Shōjo Cosette (2007) Zero Duel Masters
Duel Masters
(2007) Porphy no Nagai Tabi (2008) Antique Bakery
Antique Bakery
(2008) Hyakko
Hyakko
(2008) Kon'nichiwa Anne: Before Green Gables (2009) Ukkari Pénélope (2009–2010)

2010s

Karl to Fushigi na Tou (2010–2011) Rita to Nantoka (2010) Ukkari Pénélope (2013) Chou Zenmairobo: Patrasche (2013–2014) Meitantei Rascal (2014)

Specials

King Fang (1978) Anne's Diary: The Story of Anne Frank (1979) Hit and Run (1979) Maegami Tarou (1979) Tondemo Nezumi Daikatsuyaku: Manxmouse (1979) Back to the Forest (1980) Sango-sho Densetsu: Aoi Umi no Erufii (1986) The Story of Fifteen Boys (1987) Kuni-chan no Ikka Ranran (1994) Miyori no Mori
Miyori no Mori
(2007)

OVAs

Locke the Superman: Lord Leon (1989) Jungle Wars (1991) Locke the Superman: New World Command (1991) Yamato Takeru: After War (1995) Boku wa Ō-sama (1996) Hunter × Hunter
Hunter × Hunter
(2002–2004) Araiso Private School Student Council Executive Committee (2002) Ukkari Pénélope OVA (2007)

Films

Yakyū-kyō no Uta: Kita no Ōkami, Minami no Tora (1979) 3000 Leagues in Search of Mother
3000 Leagues in Search of Mother
(1980) Future Boy Conan: The Revival of the Giant Machine (1984) Locke the Superman: Witch Era (1984) Utsunomiko
Utsunomiko
(1989) The Story of Perrine: The Movie (1990) Chibi Maruko-chan
Chibi Maruko-chan
(1990) Tottoi (1992) Chibi Maruko-chan: My Favorite Song (1992) Kin-chan no Cinema Jack 1 (1993) Heisei Inu Monogatari Bau: Genshi Inu Monogatari Bau (1994) Kin-chan no Cinema Jack 2 (1994) Dragon Quest Retsuden: Roto no Monshō (1996) Magical Circle Guru Guru
Magical Circle Guru Guru
(1996) Violinist of Hameln
Violinist of Hameln
(1996) The Dog of Flanders: The Movie (1997) Marco: 3000 Leagues in Search of Mother
3000 Leagues in Search of Mother
(1999) Locke the Superman: Mirror Ring (2000) Beyblade: Fierce Battle (2002) Tensai Bakavon: Yomigaeru Flanders no Inu (2015) Sinbad: A Flying Princess and a Secret Island (2015) Chibi Maruko-chan: Italia Kara Kita Shōnen (2015) Sinbad: The Magic Lamp and the Moving Islands (2016) Sinbad: Night at High Noon and the Wonder Gate (2016) Gekijōban Haikara-san ga Tōru
Haikara-san ga Tōru
Zenpen - Benio, Hana no 17-sai (2017) Gekijōban Haikara-san ga Tōru
Haikara-san ga Tōru
Kōhen - Tokyo
Tokyo
Dai Roman (2018)

Other works

World Masterpiece Theater
World Masterpiece Theater
(1969–1997, 2007–2009) Mix Master (2005–2006) Hammerin' Harry
Hammerin' Harry
(web, 2008)

People

Hayao Miyazaki Isao Takahata

Category

Awards for Hayao Miyazaki

v t e

Academy Award for Best Animated Feature

2000s

Shrek
Shrek
Aron Warner (2001) Spirited Away
Spirited Away
Hayao Miyazaki
Hayao Miyazaki
(2002) Finding Nemo
Finding Nemo
Andrew Stanton
Andrew Stanton
(2003) The Incredibles
The Incredibles
Brad Bird
Brad Bird
(2004) Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit – Nick Park
Nick Park
and Steve Box (2005) Happy Feet
Happy Feet
– George Miller (2006) Ratatouille – Brad Bird
Brad Bird
(2007) WALL-E
WALL-E
Andrew Stanton
Andrew Stanton
(2008) Up – Pete Docter
Pete Docter
(2009)

2010s

Toy Story 3
Toy Story 3
Lee Unkrich
Lee Unkrich
(2010) Rango – Gore Verbinski
Gore Verbinski
(2011) Brave – Mark Andrews and Brenda Chapman (2012) Frozen – Chris Buck, Jennifer Lee, and Peter Del Vecho
Peter Del Vecho
(2013) Big Hero 6 – Don Hall, Chris Williams, and Roy Conli (2014) Inside Out – Pete Docter
Pete Docter
and Jonas Rivera
Jonas Rivera
(2015) Zootopia
Zootopia
– Byron Howard, Rich Moore, and Clark Spencer (2016) Coco – Lee Unkrich
Lee Unkrich
and Darla K. Anderson
Darla K. Anderson
(2017)

v t e

Academy Honorary Award

1928–1950

Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
/ Charlie Chaplin
Charlie Chaplin
(1928) Walt Disney
Walt Disney
(1932) Shirley Temple
Shirley Temple
(1934) D. W. Griffith
D. W. Griffith
(1935) The March of Time
The March of Time
/ W. Howard Greene and Harold Rosson (1936) Edgar Bergen
Edgar Bergen
/ W. Howard Greene / Museum of Modern Art
Museum of Modern Art
Film Library / Mack Sennett
Mack Sennett
(1937) J. Arthur Ball / Walt Disney
Walt Disney
/ Deanna Durbin
Deanna Durbin
and Mickey Rooney
Mickey Rooney
/ Gordon Jennings, Jan Domela, Devereaux Jennings, Irmin Roberts, Art Smith, Farciot Edouart, Loyal Griggs, Loren L. Ryder, Harry D. Mills, Louis Mesenkop, Walter Oberst / Oliver T. Marsh and Allen Davey / Harry Warner
Harry Warner
(1938) Douglas Fairbanks
Douglas Fairbanks
/ Judy Garland
Judy Garland
/ William Cameron Menzies / Motion Picture Relief Fund (Jean Hersholt, Ralph Morgan, Ralph Block, Conrad Nagel)/ Technicolor Company (1939) Bob Hope
Bob Hope
/ Nathan Levinson (1940) Walt Disney, William Garity, John N. A. Hawkins, and the RCA Manufacturing Company / Leopold Stokowski
Leopold Stokowski
and his associates / Rey Scott / British Ministry of Information (1941) Charles Boyer
Charles Boyer
/ Noël Coward
Noël Coward
/ Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
(1942) George Pal
George Pal
(1943) Bob Hope
Bob Hope
/ Margaret O'Brien
Margaret O'Brien
(1944) Republic Studio, Daniel J. Bloomberg, and the Republic Studio Sound Department / Walter Wanger
Walter Wanger
/ The House I Live In / Peggy Ann Garner (1945) Harold Russell
Harold Russell
/ Laurence Olivier
Laurence Olivier
/ Ernst Lubitsch
Ernst Lubitsch
/ Claude Jarman Jr. (1946) James Baskett
James Baskett
/ Thomas Armat, William Nicholas Selig, Albert E. Smith, and George Kirke Spoor
George Kirke Spoor
/ Bill and Coo / Shoeshine (1947) Walter Wanger
Walter Wanger
/ Monsieur Vincent
Monsieur Vincent
/ Sid Grauman
Sid Grauman
/ Adolph Zukor
Adolph Zukor
(1948) Jean Hersholt
Jean Hersholt
/ Fred Astaire
Fred Astaire
/ Cecil B. DeMille
Cecil B. DeMille
/ The Bicycle Thief (1949) Louis B. Mayer
Louis B. Mayer
/ George Murphy
George Murphy
/ The Walls of Malapaga (1950)

1951–1975

Gene Kelly
Gene Kelly
/ Rashomon
Rashomon
(1951) Merian C. Cooper
Merian C. Cooper
/ Bob Hope
Bob Hope
/ Harold Lloyd
Harold Lloyd
/ George Mitchell / Joseph M. Schenck / Forbidden Games
Forbidden Games
(1952) 20th Century-Fox Film Corporation / Bell & Howell Company / Joseph Breen / Pete Smith (1953) Bausch & Lomb Optical Company / Danny Kaye
Danny Kaye
/ Kemp Niver / Greta Garbo / Jon Whiteley
Jon Whiteley
/ Vincent Winter / Gate of Hell (1954) Samurai I: Musashi Miyamoto (1955) Eddie Cantor
Eddie Cantor
(1956) Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers
Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers
/ Gilbert M. "Broncho Billy" Anderson / Charles Brackett / B. B. Kahane (1957) Maurice Chevalier
Maurice Chevalier
(1958) Buster Keaton
Buster Keaton
/ Lee de Forest
Lee de Forest
(1959) Gary Cooper
Gary Cooper
/ Stan Laurel
Stan Laurel
/ Hayley Mills
Hayley Mills
(1960) William L. Hendricks / Fred L. Metzler / Jerome Robbins
Jerome Robbins
(1961) William J. Tuttle
William J. Tuttle
(1964) Bob Hope
Bob Hope
(1965) Yakima Canutt
Yakima Canutt
/ Y. Frank Freeman
Y. Frank Freeman
(1966) Arthur Freed (1967) John Chambers / Onna White (1968) Cary Grant
Cary Grant
(1969) Lillian Gish
Lillian Gish
/ Orson Welles
Orson Welles
(1970) Charlie Chaplin
Charlie Chaplin
(1971) Charles S. Boren / Edward G. Robinson
Edward G. Robinson
(1972) Henri Langlois
Henri Langlois
/ Groucho Marx
Groucho Marx
(1973) Howard Hawks
Howard Hawks
/ Jean Renoir
Jean Renoir
(1974) Mary Pickford
Mary Pickford
(1975)

1976–2000

Margaret Booth (1977) Walter Lantz
Walter Lantz
/ Laurence Olivier
Laurence Olivier
/ King Vidor
King Vidor
/ Museum of Modern Art Department of Film (1978) Hal Elias / Alec Guinness
Alec Guinness
(1979) Henry Fonda
Henry Fonda
(1980) Barbara Stanwyck
Barbara Stanwyck
(1981) Mickey Rooney
Mickey Rooney
(1982) Hal Roach
Hal Roach
(1983) James Stewart
James Stewart
/ National Endowment for the Arts
National Endowment for the Arts
(1984) Paul Newman
Paul Newman
/ Alex North (1985) Ralph Bellamy
Ralph Bellamy
(1986) Eastman Kodak
Kodak
Company / National Film Board of Canada
National Film Board of Canada
(1988) Akira Kurosawa
Akira Kurosawa
(1989) Sophia Loren
Sophia Loren
/ Myrna Loy
Myrna Loy
(1990) Satyajit Ray
Satyajit Ray
(1991) Federico Fellini
Federico Fellini
(1992) Deborah Kerr
Deborah Kerr
(1993) Michelangelo Antonioni
Michelangelo Antonioni
(1994) Kirk Douglas
Kirk Douglas
/ Chuck Jones
Chuck Jones
(1995) Michael Kidd
Michael Kidd
(1996) Stanley Donen
Stanley Donen
(1997) Elia Kazan
Elia Kazan
(1998) Andrzej Wajda
Andrzej Wajda
(1999) Jack Cardiff
Jack Cardiff
/ Ernest Lehman (2000)

2001–present

Sidney Poitier
Sidney Poitier
/ Robert Redford
Robert Redford
(2001) Peter O'Toole
Peter O'Toole
(2002) Blake Edwards
Blake Edwards
(2003) Sidney Lumet
Sidney Lumet
(2004) Robert Altman
Robert Altman
(2005) Ennio Morricone
Ennio Morricone
(2006) Robert F. Boyle (2007) Lauren Bacall
Lauren Bacall
/ Roger Corman
Roger Corman
/ Gordon Willis
Gordon Willis
(2009) Kevin Brownlow / Jean-Luc Godard
Jean-Luc Godard
/ Eli Wallach
Eli Wallach
(2010) James Earl Jones
James Earl Jones
/ Dick Smith (2011) D. A. Pennebaker
D. A. Pennebaker
/ Hal Needham
Hal Needham
/ George Stevens Jr.
George Stevens Jr.
(2012) Angela Lansbury
Angela Lansbury
/ Steve Martin
Steve Martin
/ Piero Tosi (2013) Jean-Claude Carrière
Jean-Claude Carrière
/ Hayao Miyazaki
Hayao Miyazaki
/ Maureen O'Hara
Maureen O'Hara
(2014) Spike Lee
Spike Lee
/ Gena Rowlands
Gena Rowlands
(2015) Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
/ Lynn Stalmaster / Anne V. Coates / Frederick Wiseman (2016) Charles Burnett / Owen Roizman / Donald Sutherland
Donald Sutherland
/ Agnès Varda (2017)

v t e

Annie Award for Directing in a Feature Production

John Lasseter
John Lasseter
(1996) Ron Clements
Ron Clements
and John Musker
John Musker
(1997) Tony Bancroft and Barry Cook (1998) Brad Bird
Brad Bird
(1999) John Lasseter, Ash Brannon and Lee Unkrich
Lee Unkrich
(2000) Andrew Adamson and Vicky Jenson (2001) Hayao Miyazaki
Hayao Miyazaki
(2002) Andrew Stanton
Andrew Stanton
and Lee Unkrich
Lee Unkrich
(2003) Brad Bird
Brad Bird
(2004) Nick Park
Nick Park
and Steve Box (2005) Tim Johnson and Karey Kirkpatrick
Karey Kirkpatrick
(2006) Brad Bird
Brad Bird
(2007) Mark Osborne and John Stevenson (2008) Pete Docter
Pete Docter
(2009) Dean DeBlois
Dean DeBlois
and Chris Sanders
Chris Sanders
(2010) Jennifer Yuh Nelson
Jennifer Yuh Nelson
(2011) Rich Moore
Rich Moore
(2012) Chris Buck
Chris Buck
and Jennifer Lee (2013) Dean DeBlois
Dean DeBlois
(2014) Pete Docter
Pete Docter
(2015) Byron Howard
Byron Howard
and Rich Moore
Rich Moore
(2016) Lee Unkrich
Lee Unkrich
and Adrian Molina (2017)

v t e

Annie Award for Writing in a Feature Production

Andrew Stanton, Joss Whedon, Joel Cohen and Alec Sokolow (1996) Rita Hsiao, Chris Sanders, Philip LaZebnik, Raymond Singer and Eugenia Bostwick-Singer (1998) Brad Bird
Brad Bird
and Tim McCanlies (1999) John Lasseter, Pete Docter, Ash Brannon, Andrew Stanton, Rita Hsiao, Doug Chamberlin and Chris Webb (2000) Ted Elliott, Terry Rossio, Joe Stillman and Roger S. H. Schulman (2001) Hayao Miyazaki
Hayao Miyazaki
(2002) Andrew Stanton, Bob Peterson and David Reynolds (2003) Brad Bird
Brad Bird
(2004) Steve Box, Nick Park
Nick Park
and Mark Burton (2005) Dick Clement, Ian La Frenais, Christopher Lloyd, Joe Keenan and William Davies (2006) Brad Bird
Brad Bird
(2007) Jonathan Aibel and Glenn Berger (2008) Wes Anderson
Wes Anderson
and Noah Baumbach
Noah Baumbach
(2009) Chris Sanders, Will Davies and Dean DeBlois
Dean DeBlois
(2010) James Ward Byrkit, John Logan and Gore Verbinski
Gore Verbinski
(2011) Phil Johnston and Jennifer Lee (2012) Hayao Miyazaki
Hayao Miyazaki
(2013) Phil Lord and Christopher Miller
Phil Lord and Christopher Miller
(2014) Pete Docter, Meg LeFauve and Josh Cooley (2015) Jared Bush and Phil Johnston (2016) Adrian Molina and Matthew Aldrich (2017)

v t e

Critics' Choice Movie Award for Best Animated Feature

1998–2000

A Bug's Life
A Bug's Life
John Lasseter
John Lasseter
and Andrew Stanton
Andrew Stanton
/ The Prince of Egypt – Simon Wells, Brenda Chapman, and Steve Hickner (1998) Toy Story 2
Toy Story 2
– John Lasseter, Lee Unkrich, and Ash Brannon (1999) Chicken Run
Chicken Run
Peter Lord
Peter Lord
and Nick Park
Nick Park
(2000)

2001–2010

Shrek
Shrek
Andrew Adamson and Vicky Jenson (2001) Spirited Away
Spirited Away
Hayao Miyazaki
Hayao Miyazaki
(2002) Finding Nemo
Finding Nemo
Andrew Stanton
Andrew Stanton
and Lee Unkrich
Lee Unkrich
(2003) The Incredibles
The Incredibles
Brad Bird
Brad Bird
(2004) Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit – Nick Park
Nick Park
and Steve Box (2005) Cars – John Lasseter
John Lasseter
and Joe Ranft (2006) Ratatouille – Brad Bird
Brad Bird
and Jan Pinkava
Jan Pinkava
(2007) WALL-E
WALL-E
Andrew Stanton
Andrew Stanton
(2008) Up – Pete Docter
Pete Docter
and Bob Peterson (2009) Toy Story 3
Toy Story 3
Lee Unkrich
Lee Unkrich
(2010)

2011–present

Rango – Gore Verbinski
Gore Verbinski
(2011) Wreck-It Ralph
Wreck-It Ralph
Rich Moore
Rich Moore
(2012) Frozen – Chris Buck
Chris Buck
and Jennifer Lee (2013) The Lego Movie
The Lego Movie
Phil Lord and Christopher Miller
Phil Lord and Christopher Miller
(2014) Inside Out – Pete Docter
Pete Docter
and Ronnie del Carmen
Ronnie del Carmen
(2015) Zootopia
Zootopia
Byron Howard
Byron Howard
and Rich Moore
Rich Moore
(2016) Coco – Lee Unkrich
Lee Unkrich
(2017)

v t e

Hochi Film Award for Best Director

Yoshimitsu Morita (1985) Kichitaro Negishi (1986) Kazuo Hara (1987) Hayao Miyazaki
Hayao Miyazaki
(1988) Toshio Masuda (1989) Jun Ichikawa (1990) Takeshi Kitano
Takeshi Kitano
(1991) Yōichi Higashi (1992) Yoichi Sai (1993) Tatsumi Kumashiro (1994) Shunji Iwai
Shunji Iwai
(1995) Yoshimitsu Morita (1996) Masato Harada
Masato Harada
(1997) Takeshi Kitano
Takeshi Kitano
(1998) Yuji Nakae (2000) Hayao Miyazaki
Hayao Miyazaki
(2001) Yoji Yamada (2002) Hideo Onchi (2003) Yoichi Sai (2004) Kenji Uchida (2005) Kichitaro Negishi (2006) Nobuhiro Yamashita (2007) Ryōsuke Hashiguchi (2008) Miwa Nishikawa (2009) Tetsuya Nakashima (2010) Sion Sono
Sion Sono
(2011) Daihachi Yoshida
Daihachi Yoshida
(2012) Kazuya Shiraishi (2013) Takashi Koizumi (2014) Yukihiko Tsutsumi (2015) Lee Sang-il (2016) Yukiko Mishima (2017)

v t e

Nebula Award for Best Script/Ray Bradbury Award

Nebula Award for Best Script

Soylent Green
Soylent Green
– Stanley R. Greenberg (1973) Sleeper – Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(1974) Young Frankenstein
Young Frankenstein
Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks
and Gene Wilder
Gene Wilder
(1975) Star Wars – George Lucas
George Lucas
(1977) The Sixth Sense M. Night Shyamalan
M. Night Shyamalan
(1999) Galaxy Quest
Galaxy Quest
– David Howard and Robert Gordon (2000) Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon
Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon
James Schamus, Kuo Jung Tsai, and Hui-Ling Wang (2001) The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring – Fran Walsh, Philippa Boyens, and Peter Jackson
Peter Jackson
(2002) The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers – Fran Walsh, Philippa Boyens, Stephen Sinclair, and Peter Jackson
Peter Jackson
(2003) The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King – Fran Walsh, Philippa Boyens, and Peter Jackson
Peter Jackson
(2004) Serenity – Joss Whedon
Joss Whedon
(2005) Howl's Moving Castle
Howl's Moving Castle
– Hayao Miyazaki, Cindy Davis Hewitt, and Donald H. Hewitt (2006) Pan's Labyrinth
Pan's Labyrinth
Guillermo del Toro
Guillermo del Toro
(2007) WALL-E
WALL-E
– Andrew Stanton, Jim Reardon, and Pete Docter
Pete Docter
(2008)

Ray Bradbury Award for Outstanding Dramatic Presentation

Terminator 2: Judgment Day – James Cameron
James Cameron
(1992) Babylon 5 J. Michael Straczynski
J. Michael Straczynski
(1999) 2000X
2000X
– Tales of the Next Millennia – Yuri Rasovsky and Harlan Ellison (2001) Joss Whedon
Joss Whedon
(2008) District 9
District 9
Neill Blomkamp
Neill Blomkamp
and Terri Tatchell
Terri Tatchell
(2009) Inception
Inception
Christopher Nolan
Christopher Nolan
(2010) Doctor Who: "The Doctor's Wife" – Richard Clark and Neil Gaiman (2011) Beasts of the Southern Wild – Benh Zeitlin, Lucy Alibar (2012) Gravity – Alfonso Cuarón
Alfonso Cuarón
and Jonás Cuarón (2013) Guardians of the Galaxy – James Gunn
James Gunn
and Nicole Perlman (2014) Mad Max: Fury Road – George Miller, Brendan McCarthy, and Nico Lathouris (2015) Arrival – Eric Heisserer (2016)

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 85117053 LCCN: nr93013379 ISNI: 0000 0001 2096 522X GND: 123015529 SELIBR: 235291 SUDOC: 034603980 BNF: cb12534287b (data) BIBSYS: 4031965 ULAN: 500372800 MusicBrainz: d6ad7116-a85f-48e7-bae1-60ef8d8602c4 NLA: 40010939 NDL: 00131702 NKC: pna2007389172 BNE: XX1140208 CiNii: DA04336579 RKD: 228796 SN

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