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The Chattahoochee River
River
forms the southern half of the Alabama
Alabama
and Georgia border, as well as a portion of the Florida
Florida
border. It is a tributary of the Apalachicola River, a relatively short river formed by the confluence of the Chattahoochee and Flint rivers and emptying from Florida
Florida
into Apalachicola Bay
Apalachicola Bay
in the Gulf of Mexico. The Chattahoochee River
River
is about 430 miles (690 km) long.[3] The Chattahoochee, Flint, and Apalachicola rivers together make up the Apalachicola–Chattahoochee–Flint River
River
Basin (ACF River
River
Basin).[3] The Chattahoochee makes up the largest part of the ACF's drainage basin.

Contents

1 Course 2 Etymology and nicknames 3 History

3.1 Early history 3.2 Removal of Native Americans 3.3 The American Civil War 3.4 Recent history

4 Modifications 5 River
River
borders 6 Atlanta 7 Flooding 8 Gauges 9 Tributaries 10 Popular culture 11 See also 12 References 13 External links

Course[edit]

Visitors putting their rafts, canoes and kayaks in the Chattahoochee River

Visitors on rafts, canoes and kayaks in the Chattahoochee River

The source of the Chattahoochee River
River
is located in Jacks Gap at the southeastern foot of Jacks Knob, in the very southeastern corner of Union County,[5][6] in the southern Blue Ridge Mountains, a subrange of the Appalachian Mountains. The headwaters of the river flow south from ridges that form the Tennessee Valley Divide. The Appalachian Trail crosses the river's uppermost headwaters. The Chattahoochee's source and upper course lies within Chattahoochee National Forest. From its source in the Blue Ridge Mountains, the Chattahoochee River flows southwesterly to Atlanta
Atlanta
and through its suburbs. It eventually turns due-south to form the southern half of the Georgia/ Alabama
Alabama
state line. Flowing through a series of reservoirs and artificial lakes, it flows by Columbus, the second-largest city in Georgia, and the Fort Benning Army base. At Columbus, it crosses the Fall Line of the eastern United States. From Lake Oliver to Fort Benning, the Chattahoochee Riverwalk
Chattahoochee Riverwalk
provides cycling, rollerblading, and walking along 15 miles (24 km) of the river's banks. Farther south, it merges with the Flint River
River
and other tributaries at Lake Seminole
Lake Seminole
near Bainbridge, to form the Apalachicola River
River
that flows into the Florida
Florida
Panhandle. Although the same river, this portion was given a different name by separated settlers in different regions during the colonial times. Etymology and nicknames[edit] The name Chattahoochee is thought to come from a Muskogean word meaning "rocks-marked" (or "painted"), from chato ("rock") plus huchi ("marked").[2] This possibly refers to the many colorful granite outcroppings along the northeast-to-southwest segment of the river. Much of that segment of the river runs through the Brevard fault zone. A local Georgia nickname for the Chattahoochee River
River
is "The Hooch".[7] History[edit] Early history[edit] The vicinity of the Chattahoochee River
River
was inhabited in prehistoric times by indigenous peoples since at least 1000 BC. The Kolomoki Mounds, now protected in the Kolomoki Mounds
Kolomoki Mounds
Historic Park near present-day Blakely in Early County in southwest Georgia, were built from 350 AD to 650 AD and constitute the largest mound complex in the state.[8][9] Removal of Native Americans[edit] Among the historical Indigenous nations, the Chattahoochee served as a dividing line between the Muscogee
Muscogee
(Creek) (to the east) and the Cherokee
Cherokee
territories (to the west) in the Southeast. The Chattahoochee River
River
became the dividing point for the Creek Confederacy, which straddled the river and became known as the Upper Creek
Upper Creek
Red Sticks and the Lower Creek
Lower Creek
White Sticks.[10] The United States
United States
accomplished the removal of Native Americans, to extinguish their claims and make way for European-American settlement, through a series of treaties, land lotteries, and forced removals lasting from 1820 through 1832. The Muscogee
Muscogee
were first removed from the southeastern side of the river, and then the Cherokee
Cherokee
from the northwest.[11] The American Civil War[edit] The Chattahoochee River
River
was of considerable strategic importance during the Atlanta
Atlanta
Campaign by Union General William Tecumseh Sherman of the American Civil War. Between the tributaries of Proctor Creek and Nickajack Creek on the Cobb and Fulton county lines in metropolitan Atlanta, are nine remaining "Shoupades" that were part of a defensive line occupied by the Confederate Army
Confederate Army
in early July 1864. Designed by Confederate Brigadier General Francis A. Shoup, the line became known as Johnston's River Line
Johnston's River Line
after Confederate General Joseph E. Johnston
Joseph E. Johnston
and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. A month prior to the Battle of Atlanta, Shoup talked with Johnston on June 18, 1864 about building fortifications. Johnston agreed, and Shoup supervised the building of 36 small elevated earth and wooden triangular fortifications, arranged in a sawtooth pattern to maximize the crossfire of defenders. Sherman tried to avoid the Shoupade defenses by crossing the river to the northeast. The nine remaining Shoupades consist of the earthworks portion of the original earth and wooden structures; they are endangered by land development in the area.[12] Recent history[edit] Since the nineteenth century, early improvements and alterations to the river were for the purposes of navigation. The river was important for carrying trade and passengers and was a major transportation route. In the twentieth century, the United States
United States
Congress passed legislation in 1944 and 1945 to improve navigation for commercial traffic on the river, as well as to establish hydroelectric power and recreational facilities on a series of lakes to be created by building dams and establishing reservoirs. Creating the manmade, 46,000-acre Walter F. George Lake
Walter F. George Lake
required evacuating numerous communities, including the historically majority-Native American settlement of Oketeyeconne, Georgia.[13] The lakes were complete in 1963, covering over numerous historic and prehistoric sites of settlement.[14] Beginning in the late twentieth century, the nonprofit organization called "Upper Chattahoochee Riverkeeper" has advocated for the preservation of the environment and ecology of the northern part of the river, especially the part traversing Metropolitan Atlanta. In 2010, a campaign to create a whitewater river course was launched in the portion of the Chattahoochee River
River
that runs through Columbus, Georgia. Between 2010 and 2013, construction took place on the river, the Eagle and Phenix and City Mills Dams were breached and a 2.5 mile Whitewater
Whitewater
Course was formed in Uptown, Columbus. The project returned the river to its natural path across the Fall Line, as well as creating the longest urban whitewater course in the world. Modifications[edit] Several large manmade reservoirs, including Lanier, Walter F. George, West Point, and George W. Andrews, lakes are controlled by the United States Army Corps of Engineers. The dams and reservoirs were developed following legislation by Congress of the mid-1940s for flood control, domestic and industrial water, hydroelectricity, recreation, and improved navigation for river barges. Most of the lakes were completed by 1963.[14] Numerous historic and prehistoric sites were covered over by the lakes during the flooding of the reservoirs, including Oketeyconne, Georgia.[13] The Georgia Power
Georgia Power
Company also owns a small series of dams along the middle portion of the river (the Columbus area) between West Point Lake and Lake Walter F. George. Several smaller and older lakes and dams also provide these services on a much smaller and more localized scale, including Bull Sluice Lake, which is held by the Morgan Falls Dam. This dam was built by the Georgia Railway and Power Company
Georgia Railway and Power Company
in 1902 to provide electric power for the Atlanta
Atlanta
trolley system, which has long since been replaced by other forms of transportation. River
River
borders[edit]

The Chattahoochee River
River
in Autumn

At various points, the Chattahoochee serves as the boundary between several counties and cities, as well as forming the lower half of the boundary between Alabama
Alabama
and Georgia. Within Georgia, it divides:

Habersham County and White County Forsyth County and Hall County Forsyth County and Gwinnett County Fulton County and Gwinnett County Sandy Springs and Roswell Cobb County and Fulton County Douglas County and Fulton County Carroll County and Fulton County Carroll County and Coweta County Columbus, Georgia
Columbus, Georgia
and Phenix City, Alabama

Atlanta[edit]

The Ramblin' Raft Race, an annual event in Atlanta, was cancelled in 1980 due to environmental concerns

Atlanta
Atlanta
is built upon the crest of a large ridge, rather than in the floodplain of the river. This has contributed the preservation of much of the natural scenic beauty of the section that runs through metropolitan Atlanta. North of the metropolis, the Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area protects other portions of the riverbanks in a region that is spread across several disconnected areas.[15] The river traverses through much of Atlanta's hilly topography of the northern suburbs. Wealthy suburban communities in northern metro Atlanta
Atlanta
that abut the river include: Vinings, Buckhead, Sandy Springs, East Cobb, Roswell, Dunwoody, Peachtree Corners, Johns Creek, and Berkeley Lake. Since three states have needs related to the river, there has been increasing controversy since the late twentieth century related to competing development among the regions and the implications for the river. The enormous growth of metropolitan Atlanta
Atlanta
has increased its water withdrawals from the river. This has effects downstream. For example, the oysters in the Apalachicola Bay
Apalachicola Bay
of Florida
Florida
depend on the brackish water mixture of river and ocean water, and the alternating freshwater and saltwater flows that the river and the tides provide. The amount of flow in the Chattahoochee has also been decreased by interbasin water transfers, where water is withdrawn from the Chattahoochee, but discharged as treated sewage water into another river, such as the Oconee River, which flow to the Atlantic Seaboard via the Altamaha River. Interest groups and the state of Florida
Florida
have asked the U.S. Congress to intervene to reduce the priority given to put navigation of the lower Chattahoochee, south of Columbus, by river barge. This requirement causes large water withdrawals, which environmental supporters consider a waste of water needed to support habitats, especially during droughts. The navigation issue has aggravated the fight between Georgia, Florida, and Alabama
Alabama
over rights to the river water. A lawsuit has been filed in the case to reduce priorities given to navigation. The lawsuit is now in court, and may take years to resolve.[when?] Flooding[edit]

This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it. (June 2008)

The most recent major flooding of the Chattahoochee River
River
took place in November 2009. This was caused by torrential rains from Tropical Storm Ida as it tore through the Georgia Piedmont. Downstream from Roswell, the Chattahoochee River
River
remained in moderate flood stage. Streams affected by the September 2009 floods included the following:

Chattahoochee River Vickery Creek Johns Creek Sweetwater Creek Nancy Creek Peachtree Creek Oconee River James Creek

The second most recent major flood along the river occurred during the 2009 Georgia floods, with 28.10 feet (8.56 m) of water recorded at Vinings
Vinings
at the northwestern Atlanta
Atlanta
city limit. The flood was over 5 feet (1.5 m) higher than the previous flood recorded in September 2004, as a result of Hurricane Fred. Numerous tributaries also swelled far over and beyond their banks. These were the highest water levels seen since 1990, and the second-highest ever since the large Buford Dam
Buford Dam
was built upstream. The National Weather Service
National Weather Service
in Peachtree City
Peachtree City
estimated that this was a 500-year flood
500-year flood
event. Gauges[edit] The main stream gauges are located:

at Helen (near downtown)[16] near Cornelia (6 miles or 10 km northwest of)[17] near Buford (4 miles or 6 km northwest of) immediately down from Buford Dam[18] near Norcross (5 miles or 8 km north of) on Medlock Bridge Road[19] near Roswell (4 miles or 6 km southeast of) just off old Riverside Road[20] below Morgan Falls Dam
Morgan Falls Dam
TW[21] at Vinings
Vinings
(3 miles or 5 km southwest of) and Atlanta
Atlanta
on Pace's Ferry Road bridge[22] near Campbellton (1 mile or 2 km northwest of) and Fairburn on Georgia 92 bridge[23] at Whitesburg (2 miles or 3 km southeast of) at Main Street (Georgia 18) bridge[24] at Franklin at Main Street (U.S. 27) bridge in downtown[25] at West Point (1 mile or 2 km "northeast", actually north, of the center of town)[26] at Columbus on 4th Street N (U.S. 280) bridge to Phenix City, Alabama[27] at Walter F. George Dam (USACE) in Fort Gaines[28] at George W. Andrews Lake
George W. Andrews Lake
& dam (USACE) south of Columbia, Alabama then in November 2009 it flooded Vinings
Vinings
again.[29]

Water-level forecasts are regularly issued only at Vinings
Vinings
and Atlanta. Forecasts are issued only during high water at Norcross, Whitesburg, West Point, and the Lake Walter F. George and Andrews Dams. All other locations have observations only. Tributaries[edit]

The Upper Chattahoochee River
River
Campground north of Helen, White County, Georgia

Chattahoochee River
River
at River
River
Park on Willeo Road, Fulton County, Georgia

The Chattahoochee River
River
at the Devil's Shoals, East Palisades Park, Fulton County, Georgia

Sweetwater Creek

Tributary
Tributary
creeks, streams, and rivers, as well as lakes, along with the county they are in:

Dukes Creek
Dukes Creek
(White) Smith Creek (White) Chickamauga Creek (White) Blue Creek (White) White Creek (White) Mossy Creek (White) Amys Creek (Habersham) Soque River
River
(Habersham) Mud Creek (Habersham and Hall) Hagen Creek (Hall) Flat Creek (White and Hall) Helen gauge (HDCG1) Big Creek (Hall) Lake Lanier
Lake Lanier
and Buford Dam
Buford Dam
(Dawson, Forsyth, Gwinnett, Hall, and Lumpkin)

Chestatee River
River
(Dawson/Hall border, Forsyth/Hall border, and Lumpkin)

Six Mile Creek (Forsyth) James Creek (Forsyth) Johns Creek (Forsyth and north Fulton, city of Johns Creek, Georgia) Bald Ridge Creek (Forsyth) Audry Mill Creek (North Fulton) Crooked Creek (DeKalb) Young Deer Creek (Forsyth) Four Mile Creek (Forsyth) Dick Creek (Forsyth) Level Creek (Gwinnett) Haw Creek (Forsyth) Two Mile Creek (Forsyth) Shoal Creek (Gwinnett and Hall) Suwanee Creek (Gwinnett) Brushy Creek (Gwinnett) Richland Creek (Gwinnett) Rogers Creek (Gwinnett) Norcross gauge (NCRG1) Mavern Creek (north Fulton) Old Mill Creek (north Fulton) Vickery Creek
Vickery Creek
(Forsyth, north Fulton) Roswell gauge (RWLG1) Willeo Creek
Willeo Creek
(Cobb/Fulton border) Bull Sluice Lake
Bull Sluice Lake
and Morgan Falls Dam Ball Mill Creek (DeKalb and Fulton) Beech Creek (Fulton) Summerbrook Creek (Fulton) Mountain Health Creek (Fulton) Arrowhead Creek (Cobb) Mulberry Creek (Cobb) Nancy Creek (DeKalb and Fulton) Nannyberry Creek (Cobb) Nickajack Creek (Cobb) Owl Creek (Cobb) Rottenwood Creek (Cobb) Sope Creek
Sope Creek
(Cobb) Trout Lily Creek (Cobb) Vinings
Vinings
gauge at Pace's Ferry (VING1) Peachtree Creek
Peachtree Creek
(Fulton) Proctor Creek (Fulton) Cabin Creek (Fulton) Camp Creek (Fulton) Charlie's Trapping Creek (Fulton) Crooked Creek (Fulton and Gwinnett) Dog River
River
(Douglas) Hewlett Creek (Fulton) Long Island Creek (Fulton) Marsh Creek (Fulton) Whitewater
Whitewater
Creek (Fulton) Sandy Creek (Fulton) Sweetwater Creek (Cobb, Douglas, and Paulding) Pea Creek (south Fulton) Pine Creek (south Fulton) Deep Creek (south Fulton) Mill Branch (south Fulton) Brock Branch (south Fulton) Browns Lake (south Fulton) Anneewakee Creek (Douglas) Basket Creek (Douglas) Bear Creek (Douglas) Bear Creek (south Fulton) Tuggle Creek (south Fulton) White Oak Creek (south Fulton) Turkey Creek (south Fulton) Gilberts Branch (Douglas) Hurricane Creek (Carroll and Douglas) Wolf Creek (Carroll) Snake Creek (Carroll) Wahoo Creek (Coweta) Whitesburg gauge (WHTG1) Mulberry Creek (Harris and Talbot) Pataula Creek (Clay, Quitman, Randolph, and Stewart) Bull Creek (Muscogee) Upatoi Creek (Chattahoochee/ Muscogee
Muscogee
border and Marion/Talbot border) Moores Creek (Langdale, AL) West Point gauge (WTPG1) West Point Lake
West Point Lake
(Chambers, AL, Heard, GA, and Troup, GA) Lake Harding (Harris, GA and Lee, AL) Goat Rock Lake (Harris, GA and Lee, AL) Lake Oliver (Lee, AL, Russell, AL, and Muscogee, GA) Columbus gauge (CMUG1) Walter F. George Lake
Walter F. George Lake
(Barbour, Henry, Houston, and Russell, AL and Clay, Quitman, and Stewart, GA) Omussee Creek (Houston, AL) Lake Seminole
Lake Seminole
(Jackson, FL, Decatur, GA, and Seminole, GA)

Note that the above list is incomplete, and that each item is not in the exact order in which it joins the Chattahoochee. (For confluences now inundated by lakes, it may be impossible to determine from current maps exactly where they were.) Popular culture[edit] The beauty of the Chattahoochee River
River
is commemorated in the epic poem The Song of the Chattahoochee (1877),[30] by the noted Georgian poet Sidney Lanier. Lake Lanier
Lake Lanier
on the Chattahoochee is named for him. Country music
Country music
artist Alan Jackson
Alan Jackson
released his song "Chattahoochee" in 1993 as a single off his album A Lot About Livin' (And a Little 'bout Love). "Chattahoochee" received Country Music Association
Country Music Association
awards for Single of the Year and Song of the Year.[31] See also[edit]

List of Alabama
Alabama
rivers List of Florida
Florida
rivers List of Georgia rivers Metropolitan River
River
Protection Act

References[edit]

^ Calculated in Google Maps
Google Maps
and Google Earth ^ a b c d U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Chattahoochee River ^ a b c d "Chattahoochee-Flint River
River
Basin". River
River
Basin Center. Archived from the original on June 9, 2010. Retrieved 4 August 2010.  ^ "Water resources data for the United States, Water Year 2009; gage 02343801, Chattahoochee River
River
near Columbia, GA" (PDF). USGS. Retrieved 4 August 2010.  ^ "EPA MyWaters Mapper". Environmental Protection Agency. Retrieved 2015-12-03.  ^ "Geographic Names Information System (GNIS)". USGS. Retrieved 2015-12-03.  ^ Barnett, Cynthia (2011-09-20). Blue Revolution: Unmaking America's Water Crisis. Beacon Press. ISBN 9780807003183.  ^ "Chattahoochee River". New Georgia Encyclopedia. Retrieved 27 November 2010.  ^ "Kolomoki Mounds". New Georgia Encyclopedia. Retrieved 27 November 2010.  ^ Hatch, Thom (2012). Osceola and the Great Seminole War. New York: St. Martin’s Press. pp. 18–19.  ^ "Land Lottery System". New Georgia Encyclopedia. Retrieved 27 November 2010.  ^ "Endangered Sites". Georgia Battlefields Association. Archived from the original on September 21, 2010. Retrieved 27 November 2010.  ^ a b "Oketeyeconne/Chattahoochee Theater", Historical Marker Database, accessed 23 June 2012 ^ a b "Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River
River
System History" Archived April 30, 2012, at the Wayback Machine., US Army Corps of Engineers, accessed 23 June 2012 ^ "Chattahoocheee River
River
National Recreation Area, National Park Service ^ HELG1 ^ DCNG1 ^ BUFG1 ^ NCRG1 ^ RWLG1 ^ MGFG1 ^ VING1 ^ FBNG1 ^ WHTG1 ^ FRNG1 ^ WTPG1 ^ CMUG1 ^ FOGG1 ^ COLA1 ^ "The Song of the Chattahoochee". About North Georgia. Retrieved 27 November 2010.  ^ " Alan Jackson
Alan Jackson
Biography". About.com. Retrieved 2007-08-07. 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Chattahoochee River.

Five piece series on the Chattahoochee River Fishing in Nancy Creek

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Chattahoochee River
River
Reservoirs and Dams

Nora Mill Dam Lake Lanier
Lake Lanier
/ Buford Dam Bull Sluice Lake
Bull Sluice Lake
/ Morgan Falls Dam West Point Lake Langdale Dam Crow Hop Dam Riverview Dam Lake Harding Goat Rock Lake Lake Oliver North Highlands Dam City Mills Dam Eagle & Phenix Dam Walter F. George Lake George W. Andrews Lake Lake Seminole

v t e

Atlanta
Atlanta
landmarks

Current

Commercial

Atlantic Station AmericasMart Clermont Lounge Five Points Coca-Cola sign Lenox Square Mary Mac's Tea Room Phipps Plaza Ponce City Market Underground Atlanta The Varsity

Governmental

Atlanta
Atlanta
City Hall Elbert P. Tuttle United States
United States
Court of Appeals Building Federal Penitentiary Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta Georgia Governor's Mansion Georgia Railroad Freight Depot Georgia State Capitol

Miss Freedom

Monuments

Atlanta
Atlanta
from the Ashes (The Phoenix) Carnegie Education Pavilion Millennium Gate Oakland Cemetery Stone Mountain
Stone Mountain
Confederate Memorial World Athletes Monument

Museums

APEX Museum Atlanta
Atlanta
Contemporary Art Center Atlanta
Atlanta
Cyclorama & Civil War Museum Atlanta
Atlanta
History Center Callanwolde Fine Arts Center Children's Museum of Atlanta College Football Hall of Fame Delta Flight Museum Fernbank Museum of Natural History Fernbank Science Center Hammonds House Museum High Museum of Art Jimmy Carter Library and Museum Joel Chandler Harris House
Joel Chandler Harris House
(Wren's Nest) King Plow Arts Center Margaret Mitchell
Margaret Mitchell
House and Museum Martin Luther King Jr. National Historic Site Michael C. Carlos Museum Museum of Contemporary Art of Georgia Museum of Design Atlanta National Center for Civil and Human Rights Rhodes Memorial Hall House Museum Robert C. Williams Paper Museum William Breman Jewish Heritage & Holocaust Museum World of Coca-Cola

Parks and wildlife

Atlanta
Atlanta
Botanical Garden BeltLine Stone Mountain Centennial Olympic Park Chastain Park Chattahoochee River Fernbank Forest Georgia Aquarium Grant Park Historic Fourth Ward Park Zoo Atlanta Piedmont Park Woodruff Park

Performing arts

Alliance Theatre Atlanta
Atlanta
Symphony Hall Atlanta
Atlanta
Civic Center Buckhead
Buckhead
Theatre Center for Puppetry Arts Fox Theatre Goat Farm Arts Center King Plow Arts Center Plaza Theatre Shakespeare Tavern The Masquerade The Tabernacle Tara Theatre Variety Playhouse Woodruff Arts Center

Residential (former)

Asa G. Candler Jr. (Callanwolde)

Water T. Candler (Lullwater)* Joel Chandler Harris (Wren's Nest) Alonzo F. Herndon Edward H. Inman (Swan House) Martin Luther King, Jr. Ferdinand McMillan (The Castle) Margaret Mitchell Edward C. Peters (Ivy Hall) Amos Giles Rhodes (Rhodes Hall) Rufus M. Rose Craigie House

Skyscrapers

Historic (pre-WWII)

Candler (1906) Flatiron (1897) Healey (1914) Hurt (1926) J. Mack Robinson (Empire) (1901) The Metropolitan (1911) Rhodes-Haverty (1929) Southern Bell (1929) William-Oliver (1930) Winecoff Hotel
Winecoff Hotel
(1913)

Downtown

25 Park Place
25 Park Place
(Trust Company of Georgia) 55 Marietta Street
55 Marietta Street
(Fulton National Bank) 191 Peachtree Tower Centennial Tower Equitable Five Points Plaza Fourth National Bank building Georgia Power Georgia-Pacific Tower Hyatt Regency Atlanta Marriott Marquis One Park Tower Peachtree Center Peachtree Summit State of Georgia Building SunTrust Plaza TWELVE Centennial Park Westin Peachtree Plaza Hotel

Midtown

12th & Midtown (1010 Midtown 10 Sixty Five Midtown 1075 Peachtree) 1100 Peachtree 1180 Peachtree 1280 West AT&T Midtown Center Atlantic Center Plaza Atlantic Station
Atlantic Station
(171 17th Street The Atlantic) Bank of America Plaza The Campanile Coca-Cola Colony Square CNN Center Four Seasons Hotel Atlanta/GLG Grand Georgian Terrace Hotel Mayfair Condominiums One Atlantic Center
One Atlantic Center
(IBM Tower) Promenade II Spire ViewPoint

Buckhead

2828 Peachtree 3344 Peachtree 3630 Peachtree Atlanta
Atlanta
Financial Center Atlanta
Atlanta
Plaza Buckhead
Buckhead
Grand Mandarin Oriental Paramount at Buckhead Park Avenue Condominiums Park Place The Pinnacle Realm Resurgens Plaza Terminus Tower Place

Perimeter Center

Concourse Corporate Center V & VI (King & Queen towers) Park Towers I & II Three Ravinia Drive

Sports venues

Bobby Dodd Stadium Georgia State Stadium GSU Sports Arena McCamish Pavilion Mercedes-Benz Stadium Philips Arena SunTrust Park

Former

688 Club Atlanta
Atlanta
Cabana Motel Atlanta
Atlanta
Hotel Atlanta–Fulton County Stadium Atlanta
Atlanta
(Confederate) Rolling Mill Atlantic Steel
Atlantic Steel
Mill Centennial Olympic Stadium† Coca-Cola Olympic City DeGive's Opera House Equitable Building (1892) Fourth National Bank Georgia Dome 3rd Georgia Governor's Mansion
Georgia Governor's Mansion
(John H. James mansion) Henry Grady Hotel Hotel Aragon Kimball House Loew's Grand Theatre Masonic Temple National Museum of Patriotism Omni Coliseum Paramount Theater Piedmont Hotel Ponce de Leon amusement park Ponce de Leon Park
Ponce de Leon Park
(ballpark) Ponce de Leon Springs Republic Block Rich's Riverbend Apartments Roxy Theatre SciTrek State Square Terminal Station Trout House Turner Broadcasting tower Turner Field† Union Stations: 1853 1871 1930 Post Office and Customs House/City Hall (1911-1930) Washington Hall

† – Centennial Olympic Stadium
Centennial Olympic Stadium
was rebuilt in 1997 as Turner Field. In turn, Turner Field
Turner Field
was rebuilt as Georgia State Stadium
Georgia State Stadium
in 2017.

Planned

Atlanta
Atlanta
Multi-Modal Passenger Terminal Atlanta
Atlanta
Symphony Center

v t e

Significant waterways of Florida

Larger rivers

Alapaha Apalachicola Aucilla Blackwater Caloosahatchee Chattahoochee Chipola Choctawhatchee Econlockhatchee Escambia Hillsborough Indian River Kissimmee Myakka Ochlockonee Ocklawaha Pea Peace Perdido Santa Fe St. Johns St. Marys Suwannee Withlacoochee (North) Withlacoochee (South) Yellow

Lakes

Apopka Crescent Blue Cypress East Tohopekaliga George Harney Harris Iamonia Istokpoga Jackson Jesup Kissimmee Manatee Miccosukee Monroe Okeechobee Poinsett Rodman Rousseau Seminole Talquin Tohopekaliga Tsala Apopka Ward Washington Weir

Smaller rivers

Alafia Alapahoochee Anclote Banana River Braden Carrabelle Chassahowitzka Crooked Crystal Dead East East Bay Eau Gallie Econfina Estero Homosassa Hontoon Dead Ichetucknee Imperial Little (Biscayne Bay) Little (Ochlockonee) Little Econlockhatchee Little Manatee Little Wekiva Loxahatchee Manatee Matanzas Miami Mosquito Lagoon New (Broward) New (Carabelle) New (Santa Fe) Oleta Orange Pithlachascotee Rainbow Ribault Shark Silver Sopchoppy St. Lucie St. Marks St. Sebastian Steinhatchee Tomoka Trout Waccasassa Wacissa Wakulla Weeki Wachee Wekiva

Creeks and streams

Billy's Black Blackwater (Hillsborough) Blackwater (Lake) Crane Cross Econfina Fisheating Myakkahatchee Orange Pottsburg Shingle Snapper Turkey

Canals

Canaveral Barge Canal Cross Florida
Florida
Barge Canal Haulover Canal Hillsboro Canal Miami Canal Mud Lake Canal St. Johns-Indian River
River
Barge Canal Tamiami Canal Tampa Bypass Canal

See also

Coastal waters of Florida Everglades Intracoastal Waterway Indian River
River
Lagoon List of Florida
Florida
rivers List of major springs in Florida Okeechobee Waterway Okefenokee Swamp Outstanding Florida
Florida
Waters Paynes Prairie

v t e

Significant waterways of Georgia

Larger rivers

Alapaha Alcovy Altamaha Apalachee Aucilla Broad Chattahoochee Chattooga (Coosa River) Chattooga (Tugaloo River) Canoochee Conasauga Coosa Etowah Flint Hiwassee Little (Oconee River) Little (Savannah River) Little (Withlacoochee River) Little Tallapoosa Little Tennessee Nottely Ochlockonee Ocmulgee Oconee Ogeechee River Ohoopee Satilla Savannah South (Ocmulgee River) St. Marys Suwannee Tallapoosa Toccoa Towaliga Withlacoochee Yellow

Lakes

Allatoona Blackshear Burton Carters Chatuge Chehaw George W. Andrews Goat Rock Harding Hartwell Jackson Lanier Nottely Oconee Oliver Rabun Richard B. Russell Seminole Sinclair Strom Thurmond Tugalo Walter F. George West Point

Smaller rivers

Alabaha Alapahoochee Black (Okefenokee Swamp) Cartecay Coleman Coosawattee Dog Ellijay Hudson Jacks Jerico Little (Etowah River) Little Ochlockonee Little Ogeechee (Hancock County) Little Satilla (Satilla River) Mulberry River New (Chattahoochee River) New (Withlacoochee River) Oostanaula Soque South Newport Tallulah Tugaloo Willacoochee

Tidal rivers

Bear Belfast Broro Brunswick Buffalo Bull Chestatee Crescent Crooked Cumberland Darien Duplin Frederica Halfmoon Hampton Herb Laurel View Little Ogechee (Chatham County) Little Satilla (Atlantic Ocean) Mackay Medway Mud North (Darien River) North (St. Marys River) North Newport Odingsell Sapelo Shad Skidaway Sope Tivoli Turtle Vernon Wilmington

Creeks and streams

Alligator (Little Ocmulgee River) Big Satilla Ebenezer Ichawaynochaway Kettle Kinchafoonee Little Satilla Muckalee Noonday Okapilco Peachtree Rocky Comfort Spring (Flint River) Suwannoochee Sweetwater (Chattahoochee River) Tobesofkee Williamson Swamp

Canals

Augusta Canal Brunswick–Altamaha canal Savannah–Ogeechee Canal Suwannee Canal

See also

Intracoastal Waterway Okefenokee Swamp List of Ge

.