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WorldNetDaily
WorldNetDaily
WorldNetDaily
(WND) is an American news and opinion website and online news aggregator which has been described as "fringe" and far right[2][3][4][5] as well as politically conservative.[6] It was founded in May 1997 by Joseph Farah
Joseph Farah
with the stated intent of "exposing wrongdoing, corruption and abuse of power".[7] The website publishes news, editorials, and opinion columns, while also aggregating content from other publications. It has drawn controversy for its promotion of conspiracy theories, including ones about Barack Obama's citizenship.[8][9][10][11] WND is headquartered in Washington, D.C., with Joseph Farah
Joseph Farah
serving as its editor-in-chief and CEO.Contents1 History 2 Content 3 Controversies3.1 Clark Jones libel lawsuit (2000–2008) 3.2 Anthony C
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South Gate, California
South Gate is the 17th largest city in Los Angeles
Los Angeles
County, California, with 7.4 square miles (19 km2). South Gate is located 7 miles (11 km) southeast of Downtown Los Angeles.[9] It is part of the Gateway Cities
Gateway Cities
region of southeastern Los Angeles
Los Angeles
County. As of the 2010 census, the city had a population of 94,396.[10] The city was incorporated on January 20, 1923,[11] and it became known as the "Azalea City" when it adopted the flower as its symbol in 1965.[12] In 1990, South Gate was one of ten U.S
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Freedom Of Information Act (United States)
The Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), 5 U.S.C. § 552, is a federal freedom of information law that allows for the full or partial disclosure of previously unreleased information and documents controlled by the United States government. The Act defines agency records subject to disclosure, outlines mandatory disclosure procedures and grants nine exemptions to the statute.[1][2] This amendment was signed into law by President Lyndon B
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Far-right Politics
Far-right politics
Far-right politics
are politics further on the right of the left-right spectrum than the standard political right, particularly in terms of more extreme nationalist,[1][2] and nativist ideologies, as well as authoritarian tendencies.[3] The term is often associated with Nazism,[4] neo-Nazism, fascism, neo-fascism and other ideologies or organizations that feature extreme nationalist, chauvinist, xenophobic, racist or reactionary views.[5] These can lead to oppression and violence against groups of people based on their supposed inferiority, or their perceived threat to the native ethnic group,[6][7]
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Michael Massing
Michael Massing is a contributing editor of the Columbia Journalism Review. Michael Massing received his Bachelor of Arts from Harvard and an MS from the London School of Economics
London School of Economics
and Political Science. He often writes for the New York Review of Books
New York Review of Books
concerning the media and foreign affairs. He has written for The American Prospect, The New York Times, The New Yorker
The New Yorker
and The Atlantic Monthly. In addition to his magazine contributions, he has written on the War on Drugs
War on Drugs
in his book, The Fix (2002), and on American journalism, Now They Tell Us: The American Press and Iraq
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Columbia Journalism Review
The Columbia Journalism
Journalism
Review (CJR) is an American magazine for professional journalists that has been published by the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism
Journalism
since 1961. Its contents include news and media industry trends, analysis, professional ethics, and stories behind news. In October 2015, it was announced that the publishing frequency of the print magazine was being reduced from six to two issues per year in order to focus on digital operations.[2]Contents1 Organization board 2 Finances 3 Editor 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksOrganization board[edit] The current chairman is Stephen J
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Southern Poverty Law Center
The Southern Poverty Law Center
Southern Poverty Law Center
(SPLC) is an American nonprofit legal advocacy organization specializing in civil rights and public interest litigation. Based in Montgomery, Alabama, it is noted for its successful legal cases against white supremacist groups, its classification of hate groups and other extremist organizations, and for promoting tolerance education programs.[3][4][5] SPLC was founded by Morris Dees
Morris Dees
and Joseph J. Levin Jr. in 1971 as a civil rights law firm in Montgomery.[6] Civil rights
Civil rights
leader Julian Bond served as president of the board between 1971 and 1979.[7] In 1979, the SPLC began a litigation strategy of filing civil suits for monetary damages on behalf of the victims of violence from the Ku Klux Klan and other white supremacist groups, with all damages recovered given to the victims or donated to other organizations
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Savannah, Tennessee
Savannah is a city in and the county seat of Hardin County, Tennessee, United States.[6] The population was 6,982 at the 2010 census.[7] Savannah hosted the NAIA college football national championship game from 1996 to 2007, and is home to several places of historical significance, including the Cherry Family Mansion.[8]Contents1 History1.1 Battle of Shiloh 1.2 Pickwick Landing State Park2 Geography 3 Demographics 4 Notable people 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The city's original name was "Rudd's Ferry", named for James Rudd, an early settler who established a ferry at the site in the early 1820s. Rudd's Ferry was later purchased by a wealthy landowner, David Robinson
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Al Gore
v t eAlbert Arnold Gore Jr. (born March 31, 1948) is an American politician and environmentalist who served as the 45th Vice President of the United States from 1993 to 2001. Gore was Bill Clinton's running mate in their successful campaign in 1992, and the pair was re-elected in 1996. Near the end of Clinton's second term, Gore was selected as the Democratic nominee for the 2000 presidential election but lost the election in a very close race after a Florida recount. After his term as vice-president ended in 2001, Gore remained prominent as an author and environmental activist, whose work in climate change activism earned him (jointly with the IPCC) the Nobel Peace Prize
Nobel Peace Prize
in 2007. Gore was an elected official for 24 years. He was a Representative from Tennessee
Tennessee
(1977–85) and from 1985 to 1993 served as one of the state's Senators
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Lawsuit
A lawsuit (or suit in law[a]) is "a vernacular term for a suit, action, or cause instituted or depending between two private persons in the courts of law."[1] A lawsuit is any proceeding by a party or parties against another in a court of law.[2] Sometimes, the term "lawsuit" is in reference to a civil action brought in a court of law in which a plaintiff, a party who claims to have incurred loss as a result of a defendant's actions, demands a legal or equitable remedy. The defendant is required to respond to the plaintiff's complaint. If the plaintiff is successful, judgment is in the plaintiff's favor, and a variety of court orders may be issued to enforce a right, award damages, or impose a temporary or permanent injunction to prevent an act or compel an act. A declaratory judgment may be issued to prevent future legal disputes. A lawsuit may involve dispute resolution of private law issues between individuals, business entities or non-profit organizations
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Center For Public Integrity
The Center for Public Integrity
Center for Public Integrity
(CPI) is an American nonprofit investigative journalism organization whose stated mission is "to reveal abuses of power, corruption and dereliction of duty by powerful public and private institutions in order to cause them to operate with honesty, integrity, accountability and to put the public interest first."[1] With over 50 staff members, the CPI
CPI
is one of the largest nonpartisan, nonprofit investigative centers in America.[2] It won the 2014 Pulitzer Prize
Pulitzer Prize
for Investigative Reporting.[3] The CPI
CPI
has been described as an independent,[4][5] nonpartisan[6][7][8] and progressive[9] watchdog group.[6][10] The Center releases its reports via its website to media outlets throughout the U.S. and around the globe
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Defamation
Defamation, calumny, vilification, or traducement is the communication of a false statement that harms the reputation of an individual person, business, product, group, government, religion, or nation.[1] Under common law, to constitute defamation, a claim must generally be false and must have been made to someone other than the person defamed.[2] Some common law jurisdictions also distinguish between spoken defamation, called slander, and defamation in other media such as printed words or images, called libel.[3] False light laws protect against statements which are not technically false, but which are misleading.[4] In some civil law jurisdictions, defamation is treated as a crime rather than a civil wrong.[5] The
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September 11 Attacks
The September 11 attacks (also referred to as 9/11)[a] were a series of four coordinated terrorist attacks by the Islamic terrorist group al-Qaeda on the United States
United States
on the morning of Tuesday, September 11, 2001. The attacks killed 2,996 people, injured over 6,000 others, and caused at least $10 billion in infrastructure and property damage.[2][3] Four passenger airliners operated by two major U.S. passenger air carriers ( United Airlines
United Airlines
and American Airlines) – all of which departed from airports in the northeastern United States
United States
bound for California – were hijacked by 19 al-Qaeda terrorists
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The Washington Post
The Washington Post
The Washington Post
is an American daily newspaper. Published in Washington, D.C., it was founded on December 6, 1877.[7] Located in the capital city of the United States, the newspaper has a particular emphasis on national politics. The newspaper's slogan states, "Democracy dies in darkness". Daily editions are printed for the District of Columbia, Maryland, and Virginia. It is published as a broadsheet. The newspaper has won 47 Pulitzer Prizes. This includes six separate Pulitzers awarded in 2008, second only to The New York Times' seven awards in 2002 for the highest number ever awarded to a single newspaper in one year.[8] Post journalists have also received 18 Nieman Fellowships and 368 White House
White House
News Photographers Association awards
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Shiite Islam
Sunni
Sunni
theological traditionsIlm al-KalamAsh'ari1 Maturidi Sunni
Sunni
Murji'ah Traditionalist2Shi'a Twelver3PrinciplesTawhid Adalah Prophecy Imamah QiyamahPracticesSalah Sawm Zakat Hajj Khums Jihad Commandin
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Virginia Postrel
Virginia Inman Postrel (born January 14, 1960) is an American political and cultural writer of broadly libertarian, or classical liberal, views.[2]Contents1 Early life and education 2 Career 3 Health care, bioethics, and aesthetics 4 See also 5 Bibliography 6 References 7 External linksEarly life and education[edit] Virginia Inman was born and raised in Greenville, South Carolina. Her father was an engineer and her mother was a homemaker who later went on to get her master's degree and teach at the college level. Virginia went on to college at Princeton University, graduating in 1982 with a degree in English Literature.[1] Career[edit] Postrel was editor-in-chief of Reason from July 1989 to January 2000, and remained on the masthead as editor-at-large through 2001. Prior to that, she was a reporter for Inc
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