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Tragedian
Tragedy
Tragedy
(from the Greek: τραγῳδία, tragōidia[a]) is a form of drama based on human suffering that invokes an accompanying catharsis or pleasure in audiences.[2][3] While many cultures have developed forms that provoke this paradoxical response, the term tragedy often refers to a specific tradition of drama that has played a unique and important role historically in the self-definition of Western civilisation.[2][4] That tradition has been multiple and discontinuous, yet the term has often been used to invoke a powerful effect of cultural identity and historical continuity—"the Greeks and the Elizabe
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Tragedy (event)
A tragedy is an event of great loss, usually of human life. Such an event is said to be tragic. Traditionally the event would require "some element of moral failure, some flaw in character, or some extraordinary combination of elements"[1] to be tragic. Not all death is considered a tragedy. Rather it is a precise set of symptoms surrounding the loss that define it as such.[2] There are a variety of factors that define a death as tragic. An event in which a massive number of deaths occur may be seen as a tragedy. This can be re-enforced by media attention or other public outcry.[3] A tragedy does not necessarily involve massive death
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Suffering
Suffering, or pain in a broad sense,[1] may be an experience of unpleasantness and aversion associated with the perception of harm or threat of harm in an individual.[2] Suffering
Suffering
is the basic element that makes up the negative valence of affective phenomena. The opposite of suffering is pleasure or happiness. Suffering
Suffering
is often categorized as physical[3] or mental.[4] It may come in all degrees of intensity, from mild to intolerable. Factors of duration and frequency of occurrence usually compound that of intensity. Attitudes toward suffering may vary widely, in the sufferer or other people, according to how much it is regarded as avoidable or unavoidable, useful or useless, deserved or undeserved. Suffering
Suffering
occurs in the lives of sentient beings in numerous manners, often dramatically. As a result, many fields of human activity are concerned with some aspects of suffering
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Lists Of Books
This is a list of book lists (bibliographies) on, organized by various criteria.Contents1 General lists 2 Selective lists 3 Subject lists3.1 History 3.2 People3.2.1 People in general 3.2.2 Specific persons3.3 Regions and places 3.4 Religion4 Writer lists 5 Series lists 6 Lists of fictional books 7 Lists of manuscripts 8 Mixed media lists 9 Lists by setting 10 See also10.1 Other lists 10.2 Digital libraries11 Further readingGeneral lists[edit]List of 18th-century British children's literature titles List of 19th-century British children's literature titles List of American children's books List of anonymously published works List of autobiographies List of banned books List of books written by teenagers List of book titles taken from literature List of books by year of publication List of children's books made into feature films List of Christian novels List of comic books Lists of dictionaries Lists of encyclopedias
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Lists Of Writers
The following are lists of writers:Contents1 Lists by name 2 Lists by century 3 Lists of women writers and works 4 Lists by genre 5 Lists by ethnicity or nationality 6 Lists by language (non-English) 7 See also 8 External linksLists by name[edit] A – B – C – D – E – F – G – H – I – J – K – L – M – N – O – P – Q – R – S – T – U – V – W – X – Y – Z Lists by century[edit]Notable 20th-century writers 21st-century writersLists of women writers and works[edit]Main listWomen writersBy countryAlbanian women writers Algerian women writers Argentine women writers Austrian women writers Azerbaijani women writers Bangladeshi women writers Belgian women writers Bolivian women writers Bosnia and Herzegovina women writers Brazilian women writers Bulgarian women writers Chilean women writers Chinese women writers Colombian women writers Croatian women writers Cuban women writers Czech women
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List Of Poetry Awards
This is a list of awards that are, or have been, given out to writers of poetry, either for a specific poem, collection of poems, or body of work. This is not intended to be an all-inclusive list of poetry awards; rather, it is a list of those awards which have entries on.Contents1 Major international awards 2 Asia 3 Africa 4 Australia 5 Austria 6 Canada 7 Chile7.1 Governor General's Awards8 Croatia 9 Germany 10 India 11 Ireland 12 Korea 13 New Zealand 14 Slovenia 15 Spanish (language) 16 United Kingdom 17 United States17.1 Awards given by the Academy of American Poets 17.2 Awards given by the Poetry
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Literary Criticism
Literary criticism
Literary criticism
(or literary studies) is the study, evaluation, and interpretation of literature. Modern literary criticism is often influenced by literary theory, which is the philosophical discussion of literature's goals and methods. Though the two activities are closely related, literary critics are not always, and have not always been, theorists. Whether or not literary criticism should be considered a separate field of inquiry from literary theory, or conversely from book reviewing, is a matter of some controversy. For example, the Johns Hopkins Guide to Literary Theory and Criticism[1] draws no distinction between literary theory and literary criticism, and almost always uses the terms together to describe the same concept
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Literary Theory
The literary theory in a strict sense is the systematic study of the nature of literature and of the methods for analyzing literature.[1] However, literary scholarship since the 19th century often includes—in addition to, or even instead of literary theory in the strict sense—considerations of intellectual history, moral philosophy, social prophecy, and other interdisciplinary themes which are of relevance to the way humans interpret meaning.[1] In humanities in modern academia, the latter style of scholarship is an outgrowth of critical theory and is often called simply "theory".[2] As a consequence, the word "theory" has become an umbrella term for a variety of scholarly approaches to reading texts
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Critical Theory
Critical Theory is a school of thought that stresses the reflective assessment and critique of society and culture by applying knowledge from the social sciences and the humanities. As a term, Critical Theory has two meanings with different origins and histories: the first originated in sociology and the second originated in literary criticism, whereby it is used and applied as an umbrella term that can describe a theory founded upon critique; thus, the theorist Max Horkheimer described a theory as critical insofar as it seeks "to liberate human beings from the circumstances that enslave them".[1] In sociology and political philosophy, the term Critical Theory describes the neo- Marxist philosophy
Marxist philosophy
of the Frankfurt School, which was developed in Germany in the 1930s
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Sociology Of Literature
The sociology of literature is a subfield of the sociology of culture. It studies the social production of literature and its social implications. A notable example is Pierre Bourdieu's 1992 Les Règles de L'Art: Genèse et Structure du Champ Littéraire, translated by Susan Emanuel as Rules of Art: Genesis and Structure of the Literary Field (1996).Contents1 Classical sociology 2 Lukács and the theory of the novel 3 The Frankfurt School 4 The sociology of the avant-garde 5 The sociology of the book trade 6 Genetic structuralism 7 Sociocriticism 8 Neo-Marxian ideology critique 9 Bourdieu 10 The rise of the novel 11 Cultural materialism 12 World-systems theory 13 Recent developments 14 Notes 15 ReferencesClassical sociology[edit] None of the 'founding fathers' of sociology produced a detailed study of literature, but they did develop ideas that were subsequently applied to literature by others
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Literary Magazine
A literary magazine is a periodical devoted to literature in a broad sense. Literary magazines usually publish short stories, poetry, and essays, along with literary criticism, book reviews, biographical profiles of authors, interviews and letters. Literary magazines are often called literary journals, or little magazines, terms intended to contrast them with larger, commercial magazines.[1]Contents1 History 2 Online literary magazines 3 Little magazines 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksHistory[edit] Nouvelles de la république des lettres is regarded as the first literary magazine; it was established by Pierre Bayle
Pierre Bayle
in France
France
in 1684.[2] Literary magazines became common in the early part of the 19th century, mirroring an overall rise in the number of books, magazines, and scholarly journals being published at that time
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Greek Language
Greek (Modern Greek: ελληνικά [eliniˈka], elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα [eliniˈci ˈɣlosa] ( listen), ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece
Greece
and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean
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Catharsis
Catharsis (from Greek κάθαρσις katharsis meaning "purification" or "cleansing") is the purification and purgation of emotions—particularly pity and fear—through art[1] or any extreme change in emotion that results in renewal and restoration.[2][3] It is a metaphor originally used by Aristotle
Aristotle
in the Poetics, comparing the effects of tragedy on the mind of a spectator to the effect of a cathartic o
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Outline Of Literature
The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to literature: Literature
Literature
– prose, written or oral, including fiction and non-fiction, drama, and poetry
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Culture
Culture
Culture
(/ˈkʌltʃər/) is the social behavior and norms found in human societies. Culture
Culture
is considered a central concept in anthropology, encompassing the range of phenomena that are transmitted through social learning in human societies. Some aspects of human behavior, social practices such as culture, expressive forms such as art, music, dance, ritual, religion, and technologies such as tool usage, cooking, shelter, and clothing are said to be cultural universals, found in all human societies
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