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Sahabah
The term aṣ-ṣaḥābah (Arabic: الصحابة‎ meaning "the companions", from the verb صَحِبَ meaning "accompany", "keep company with", "associate with") refers to the companions, disciples, scribes and family of the Islamic prophet Muhammad.[1][2] This form is definite plural; the indefinite singular is masculine sahabi (ṣaḥābī), feminine sahabia (ṣaḥābīyat). Later scholars accepted their testimony of the words and deeds of Muhammad, the occasions on which the Quran
Quran
was revealed and various important matters of Islamic history and practice
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Sahabi (name)
Sahabi is a surname. Notable people with the name include:Yadollah Sahabi Ezzatollah Sahabi Haleh SahabiThis page lists people with the surname Sahabi
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Timeline Of Early Islamic History
This is a timeline of the early history of Islam
Islam
during the lifetime of Muhammad
Muhammad
(610–632). The information provided in this article is based on Islamic oral tradition, not on historical or archaeological evidence. A separate list of military expeditions and battles is at List of expeditions of Muhammad. Ali Ibn Abi Talib
Ali Ibn Abi Talib
considered the first Male Muslim convert to Islam
Islam
by many early Muslim scholars.[1] Depiction by Hakob HovnatanyanIn 615, some of Muhammad's followers emigrated to the Ethiopian Aksumite Empire and founded a small colony, this was the first country Muslims migrated to
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Jurisprudence
Jurisprudence
Jurisprudence
or legal theory is the theoretical study of law, principally by philosophers but, from the twentieth century, also by social scientists. Scholars of jurisprudence, also known as jurists or legal theorists, hope to obtain a deeper understanding of legal reasoning, legal systems, legal institutions, and the role of law in society. Modern jurisprudence began in the 18th century and was focused on the first principles of the natural law, civil law, and the law of nations.[1] General jurisprudence can be divided into categories both by the type of question scholars seek to answer and by the theories of jurisprudence, or schools of thought, regarding how those questions are best answered
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Arabic Language
Arabic
Arabic
(Arabic: العَرَبِيَّة‎) al-ʻarabiyyah [ʔalʕaraˈbijːah] ( listen) or (Arabic: عَرَبِيّ‎) ʻarabī [ˈʕarabiː] ( listen) or [ʕaraˈbij]) is a Central Semitic language that first emerged in Iron Age northwestern Arabia and is now the lingua franca of the Arab world.[4] It is named after the Arabs, a term initially used to describe peoples living from Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
in the east to the Anti- Lebanon
Lebanon
mountains in the west, in northwestern Arabia, and in the Sinai peninsula. Arabic
Arabic
is classified as a macrolanguage comprising 30 modern varieties, including its standard form (Modern Standard Arabic) [5]. The modern written language (Modern Standard Arabic) is derived from Classical Arabic
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Possessions Of Muhammad
Possession may refer to:Contents1 Law 2 Linguistics 3 Supernatural possession 4 Places 5 Arts and entertainment5.1 Literature 5.2 Film and television 5.3 Music6 Other 7 See alsoLaw[edit]Dependent territory, an area of land over which another country exercises sovereignty, but which does not have the full right of participation in that country's governance Drug possession, a crime Ownership Personal property, physical possessions belonging to a person Possession (law), exclusive practical control of a thing, in the context of the legal implications of that control Title (property)Linguistics[edit]Inalienable possession, relationship between two objects that is
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Diplomatic Career Of Muhammad
Diplomatics
Diplomatics
(in American English, and in most anglophone countries), or diplomatic (in British English),[citation needed] is a scholarly discipline centred on the critical analysis of documents: especially, historical documents. It focuses on the conventions, protocols and formulae that have been used by document creators, and uses these to increase understanding of the processes of document creation, of information transmission, and of the relationships between the facts which the documents purport to record and reality. The discipline originally evolved as a tool for studying and determining the authenticity of the official charters and diplomas issued by royal and papal chanceries
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Shahnameh
The Shahnameh, also transliterated as Shahnama
Shahnama
(Persian: شاهنامه‎ pronounced [ʃɒːhnɒːˈme], "The Book
Book
of Kings"), is a long epic poem written by the Persian poet Ferdowsi between c. 977 and 1010 CE and is the national epic of Greater Iran. Consisting of some 50,000 "distichs" or couplets (two-line verses),[1] the Shahnameh
Shahnameh
is the world's longest epic poem written by a single poet. It tells mainly the mythical and to some extent the historical past of the Persian Empire
Persian Empire
from the creation of the world until the Islamic conquest of Persia
Islamic conquest of Persia
in the 7th century
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Battle Of Al-Qādisiyyah
KhuzestanHormizd-Ardashir Susa Ram-Hormizd Shushtar GundishapurCentral PersiaNahavand Spahan Waj Rudh RayNorthern PersiaTabaristan Armenia Azerbaijan Caucasian Albania IberiaParsBishapur Darabgerd 1st Estakhr Gor 2nd EstakhrKermanSirjan QeshmSakastanZaranjKhorasanOxus River Nishapur Herat BadghisThe Battle of al-Qādisiyyah
Battle of al-Qādisiyyah
(Arabic: معركة القادسيّة‎; transliteration, Ma'rakatu al-Qādisiyyah; alternative spellings: Qadisiyya, Qadisiyyah, Kadisiya, Ghadesiyeh, Persian: نبرد قادسیه‎; transliteration: Nabard-e Qādsieh), fought in 636, was a decisive battle between the Arab Muslim army and the Sassanid Persian army during the first period of Muslim expansion. It resulted in the Islamic conquest of Persia
Islamic conquest of Persia
and was key to the conquest of Iraq, which was a Persian territory at that time
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Salawat
Salawat
Salawat
is a special Arabic phrase, which contains the salutation upon the prophet of Islam. This kind of phrase is usually expressed by Muslims in their five daily prayers (during the Tashahhud) and also when the name of Muhammad
Muhammad
had been mentioned. "[1]Contents1 Etymology 2 Meaning 3 In Islamic context 4 Quranic evidence 5 In hadiths 6 Recommended salawat 7 Merits of reciting Salawat 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksEtymology[edit] Salawat
Salawat
is a plural form of salat (Arabic:صلاة) and from the root of the letters "sad, lam, waw" (Arabic ص.ل. و) which means "prayer, salutation, greeting and mercy". "[2]Meaning[edit] Arabic philologists hold the view that the meaning of the word salawat would vary according to who has used the word, and to whom it is used for
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Muhammad's First Revelation
Muhammad's first revelation
Muhammad's first revelation
was an event described in Islam
Islam
as taking place in 610 AD, during which the Islamic prophet, Muhammad
Muhammad
was visited by the archangel Gabriel, who revealed to him the beginnings of what would later become the Quran. The event took place in a cave called Hira, located on the mountain Jabal an-Nour, near Mecca. According to biographies of Muhammad,[which?] while on retreat in a mountain cave near Mecca
Mecca
(the cave of Hira), Gabriel
Gabriel
appears before him and commands him to recite the first lines of chapter 96 of the Quran
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Mawlid
Mawlid
Mawlid
or Mawlid
Mawlid
al-Nabi al-Sharif (Arabic: مَولِد النَّبِي‎ mawlidu n-nabiyyi, "Birth of the Prophet", sometimes simply called in colloquial Arabic مولد mawlid, mevlid, mevlit, mulud among other vernacular pronunciation
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Na`at
Na'at (Urdu: نعت‬‎) refers to poetry in praise of the Islamic Prophet Muhammad
Muhammad
ﷺ. The practice is popular in South Asia (Bangladesh, Pakistan
Pakistan
and India), commonly in Pashto, Bengali, Urdu
Urdu
or Punjabi language. People who recite Naat are known as Naat Khawan
Naat Khawan
or sana'a-khua'an
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Medieval Christian Views On Muhammad
During the Early Middle Ages, Christendom
Christendom
largely viewed Islam
Islam
as a Christological heresy and Muhammad
Muhammad
as a false prophet. By the Late Middle Ages, Islam
Islam
was more typically grouped with heathenism, and Muhammad
Muhammad
was viewed as inspired by the devil. A more relaxed or benign view of Islam
Islam
only developed in the modern period, after the Islamic empires ceased to be an acute military threat to Europe. See Orientalism. The earliest documented Christian knowledge of Muhammad
Muhammad
stems from Byzantine sources, written shortly after Muhammad's death in 632
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Saqifah
The Saqīfah (Arabic: السقيفة‎), also known as Saqīfah Banī Sā'idah (Arabic: سقيفة بني ساعدة‎), was a roofed building used by a Jewish tribe called Banu Sa'idah, a faction of Banu Khazraj tribe of the city of Madinah in Hejaz, western Arabia
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Relics Of Muhammad
Traditionally, Islam
Islam
has had a rich history of the veneration of relics, especially of those attributed to the Islamic
Islamic
prophet Muhammad.[1] There exists historical evidence that some of the earliest Muslims practiced the veneration of relics, and the practice continued to remain popular in many parts of the Sunni
Sunni
Islamic
Islamic
world until the eighteenth-century, when the reform movements of Salafism and Wahhabism
Wahhabism
began to staunchly condemn such practices due to their linking it with the sin of shirk (idolatry)
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