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Rencong Alphabet
Rencong, or "Rentjong," is a general term used to refer to any native writing systems found in central and south Sumatra, including Kerinci, Bengkulu, Palembang
Palembang
and Lampung.[1] These scripts lasted until the 18th century, when the Dutch colonised Indonesia. These scripts were used to write manuscripts in native languages and in Malay, such as the Tanjung Tanah Code of Law. The Malay writing was gradually replaced by the Jawi script, a localized version of the Arabic script. Rencong scripts were often written on tree bark, bamboo, horns and palmyra-palm leaves
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South Sumatra
South Sumatra
Sumatra
(Indonesian: Sumatera Selatan) is a province of Indonesia. It is located in the southern part of Sumatra
Sumatra
Island, east of the Bukit Barisan
Bukit Barisan
Mountains
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Lampung
Lampung
Lampung
is a province of Indonesia. It is located on the southern tip of the island of Sumatra
Sumatra
and borders the provinces of Bengkulu
Bengkulu
and South Sumatra
Sumatra
which lie to the north. Lampung
Lampung
is the original home of the Lampung
Lampung
people, who speak their own language and have their own script. Its capital is Bandar Lampung. The province had a population of 7,596,115 at the 2010 census;[1] the latest official estimate (as of January 2014) is 7,972,246. Three-quarters of the current population of Lampung
Lampung
is descended from migrants from Java, Madura, and Bali
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Bengkulu
Bengkulu, historically known as Bencoolen or British Bencoolen,[4][5] is one of the Provinces of Indonesia
Provinces of Indonesia
and is located in the southwest coast of Sumatra. It was formed on 18 November 1968 by separating out the former Bengkulu Residency area from South Sumatra
Sumatra
(Sumatra Selatan) province under Law No. 9 of 1967 and was realized by Government Regulation No. 20 of 1968
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Kerinci Regency
A regent (from the Latin
Latin
regens,[1] "[one] ruling"[2]) is "a person appointed to administer a state because the monarch is a minor, is absent or is incapacitated."[3] The rule of a regent or regents is called a regency. A regent or regency council may be formed ad hoc or in accordance with a constitutional rule. "Regent" is sometimes a formal title. If the regent is holding his position due to his position in the line of succession, the compound term prince regent is often used; if the regent of a minor is his mother, she is often referred to as "queen regent". If the formally appointed regent is unavailable or cannot serve on a temporary basis, a Regent
Regent
ad interim may be appointed to fill the gap. In a monarchy, a regent usually governs due to one of these reasons, but may also be elected to rule during the interregnum when the royal line has died out
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Bengkulu Language
Bengkulu, historically known as Bencoolen or British Bencoolen,[4][5] is one of the Provinces of Indonesia
Provinces of Indonesia
and is located in the southwest coast of Sumatra. It was formed on 18 November 1968 by separating out the former Bengkulu Residency area from South Sumatra
Sumatra
(Sumatra Selatan) province under Law No. 9 of 1967 and was realized by Government Regulation No. 20 of 1968
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Unicode
Unicode
Unicode
is a computing industry standard for the consistent encoding, representation, and handling of text expressed in most of the world's writing systems. The latest version contains a repertoire of 136,755 characters covering 139 modern and historic scripts, as well as multiple symbol sets
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Replacement Character
Specials is a short Unicode
Unicode
block allocated at the very end of the Basic Multilingual Plane, at U+FFF0–FFFF. Of these 16 code points, five are assigned as of Unicode
Unicode
10.0:U+FFF9 INTERLINEAR ANNOTATION ANCHOR, marks start of annotated text U+FFFA INTERLINEAR ANNOTATION SEPARATOR, marks start of annotating character(s) U+FFFB INTERLINEAR ANNOTATION TERMINATOR, marks end of annotation block U+FFFC  OBJECT REPLACEMENT CHARACTER, placeholder in the text for another unspecified object, for example in a compound document. U+FFFD � REPLACEMENT CHARACTER used to replace an unknown, unrecognized or unrepresentable character U+FFFE <noncharacter-FFFE> not a character. U+FFFF <noncharacter-FFFF> not a character.FFFE and FFFF are not unassigned in the usual sense, but guaranteed not to be a Unicode
Unicode
character at all
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Indonesia
Coordinates: 5°S 120°E / 5°S 120°E / -5; 120 Republic
Republic
of Indonesia Republik Indonesia  (Indonesian)FlagNational emblemMotto:  Bhinneka Tunggal Ika
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Old Sundanese Script
Sundanese may refer to: Sundanese people Sundanese language Sundanese script Sundanese (Unicode block)This disambiguation page
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Bark (botany)
Bark is the outermost layers of stems and roots of woody plants. Plants with bark include trees, woody vines, and shrubs. Bark refers to all the tissues outside the vascular cambium and is a nontechnical term.[1] It overlays the wood and consists of the inner bark and the outer bark. The inner bark, which in older stems is living tissue, includes the innermost area of the periderm. The outer bark in older stems includes the dead tissue on the surface of the stems, along with parts of the innermost periderm and all the tissues on the outer side of the periderm
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Bamboo
The bamboos /bæmˈbuː/ ( listen) are evergreen perennial flowering plants in the subfamily Bambusoideae of the grass family Poaceae. In bamboo, as in other grasses, the internodal regions of the stem are usually hollow and the vascular bundles in the cross section are scattered throughout the stem instead of in a cylindrical arrangement. The dicotyledonous woody xylem is also absent. The absence of secondary growth wood causes the stems of monocots, including the palms and large bamboos, to be columnar rather than tapering.[3] Bamboos include some of the fastest-growing plants in the world,[4] due to a unique rhizome-dependent system. Certain species of bamboo can grow 91 cm (36 in) within a 24-hour period, at a rate of almost 4 cm (1.6 in) an hour (a growth around 1 mm every 90 seconds, or 1 inch every 40 minutes).[5] Giant bamboos are the largest members of the grass family
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Horn (anatomy)
A horn is a permanent pointed projection on the head of various animals consisting of a covering of keratin and other proteins surrounding a core of live bone. Horns are distinct from antlers, which are not permanent. In mammals, true horns are found mainly among the ruminant artiodactyls[not verified in body], in the families Antilocapridae
Antilocapridae
(pronghorn) and Bovidae
Bovidae
(cattle, goats, antelope etc.). One pair of horns is usual; however, two or more pairs occur in a few wild species and domesticated breeds of sheep. Polycerate (multi-horned) sheep breeds include the Hebridean, Icelandic, Jacob, Manx Loaghtan, and the Navajo-Churro. Horns usually have a curved or spiral shape, often with ridges or fluting. In many species only males have horns. Horns start to grow soon after birth, and continue to grow throughout the life of the animal (except in pronghorns, which shed the outer layer annually, but retain the bony core)
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Borassus Flabellifer
Borassus
Borassus
flabellifer, commonly known as doub palm, palmyra palm, tala palm, toddy palm or wine palm,[2] is native to the Indian subcontinent and Southeast Asia, including Nepal, India, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Cambodia, Laos, Burma, Thailand, Vietnam, Malaysia, Indonesia
Indonesia
and the Philippines.[3] It is reportedly naturalized in Pakistan, Socotra, and parts of China.[4][5]Contents1 Description1.1 Fruit 1.2 Sap 1.3 Sprouts 1.4 Leaves 1.5 Trunk 1.6 Crown2 Cultivation 3 Cultural symbolism 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksDescription[edit] Borassus
Borassus
flabellifer is a robust tree and can reach a height of 30 metres (98 ft). The trunk is grey, robust and ringed with leaf scars; old leaves remain attached to the trunk for several years before falling cleanly
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Kulitan (Kapampangan Writing Script)
Writing
Writing
is a medium of human communication that represents language and emotion with signs and symbols. In most languages, writing is a complement to speech or spoken language. Writing
Writing
is not a language, but a tool used to make languages be read. Within a language system, writing relies on many of the same structures as speech, such as vocabulary, grammar, and semantics, with the added dependency of a system of signs or symbols. The result of writing is called text, and the recipient of text is called a reader. Motivations for writing include publication, storytelling, correspondence, record keeping and diary
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Rejang Language (Sumatra)
Rejangese (Rejangese: Baso Jang/Baso Həjang, pronounced as basɔ ɟaŋɡ/basɔ dʒaŋɡ, basɔ həɟaŋɡ/basɔ hədʒaŋ ) is an Austronesian languages
Austronesian languages
predominantly spoken by the Rejangese people
Rejangese people
in southwestern height of Sumatra (Bengkulu), Indonesia. There are five dialects, spread from mountainous region to the coastal region of Bengkulu, including the Cu'up dialect, the Lebong dialect, the Payang dialect, the Rawas dialect, and the Utara dialect (Pəsisia). Rejangese was written with the Rejang script
Rejang script
for a long time.[4] The script is thought to pre-date the introduction of Islam to the area in the 12th century CE, although the earliest attested document has been dated to the mid 18th century. It is traditionally written on bamboo, buffalo horn, bark or copper plates
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