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Prophecy
A prophecy is a message that is claimed by a prophet to have been communicated to them by a deity. Such messages typically involve inspiration, interpretation, or revelation of divine will concerning the prophet's social world and events to come (compare divine knowledge). The English noun "prophecy", in the sense of "function of a prophet" appeared from about 1225, from Old French profecie (12th century), and from prophetia, Greek propheteia "gift of interpreting the will of God", from Greek prophetes (see prophet). The related meaning, "thing spoken or written by a prophet", dates from c. 1300, while the verb "to prophesy" is recorded by 1377.[1]

John Wishart (bishop)

John Wishart (died 1338) was a 14th-century bishop of Glasgow. He was archdeacon of Glasgow from 1321 or earlier. After the death of Bishop John de Lindesay in 1335, John was elected to succeed him at Glasgow, and was consecrated in February 1337 at the orders of Pope Benedict XII at Avignon by Annibald de Ceccano, bishop of Tusculum. His episcopate was extremely brief. His exact death date is not known, but we know that the see was again vacant on 11 May 1338
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Bahá'u'lláh

Baháʼu'lláh[1] (12 November 1817 – 29 May 1892) was a Persian religious leader, and the founder of the Baháʼí Faith, which advocates universal peace and unity among all races, nations, and religions. At the age of 27, Baháʼu'lláh became a follower of the Báb, a Persian merchant who began preaching that God would soon send a new prophet similar to Moses, Jesus, or Muhammad.[citation needed] The Báb and thousands of followers were executed by the Iranian authorities for their beliefs.[citation needed] Baháʼu'lláh faced exile from his native Iran, and in Baghdad in 1863 claimed to be the prophet the Báb foretold
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Covenanter
Covenanters were members of a 17th-century Scottish religious and political movement, who supported a Presbyterian Church of Scotland, and the primacy of its leaders in religious affairs. The name derived from Covenant, a biblical term for a bond or agreement with God. The origins of the movement lay in disputes with James VI & I, and his son Charles I of England over church structure and doctrine. In 1638, thousands of Scots signed the National Covenant, pledging to resist changes imposed by Charles on the kirk; following victory in the 1639 and 1640 Bishops' Wars, the Covenanters took control of Scotland
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Against Heresies

Against Heresies, or On the Detection and Overthrow of the So-Called Gnosis (Ancient Greek : Ἔλεγχος καὶ ἀνατροπὴ τῆς ψευδωνύμου γνώσεως), sometimes referred to by its Latin title Adversus Haereses, is a work of Christian theology written in Greek about the year 180 by Irenaeus, the bishop of Lugdunum (now Lyon in France).[1][2][3][4][5] In it, Irenaeus identifies and describes several schools of Gnosticism, as well as other schools of Christian thought, and contrasts their beliefs with his conception of orthodox Christianity.[6] Until the discovery of the Library of Nag Hammadi in 1945, Against Heresies was the best surviving contemporary description of Gnosticism
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Irenaeus

Irenaeus (/ɪrɪˈnəs/;[1] Greek: Εἰρηναῖος Eirēnaios; c. 130 – c. 202 AD)[2] was a Greek bishop noted for his role in guiding and expanding Christian communities in what is now the south of France and, more widely, for the development of Christian theology by combating heresy and defining orthodoxy
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The Shepherd Of Hermas
The Shepherd of Hermas (Greek: Ποιμὴν τοῦ Ἑρμᾶ, Poimēn tou Herma; Latin: Pastor Hermae), sometimes just called The Shepherd, is a Christian literary work of the late first half of the second century, considered a valuable book by many Christians, and considered canonical scripture by some of the early Church fathers such as Irenaeus.[1] The Shepherd was very popular amongst Christians in the 2nd and 3rd centuries.[2] It is found in the Codex Sinaiticus,[3][4] and it is listed between the Acts of the Apostles and the Acts of Paul in the stichometrical list of the Codex Claromontanus. The work comprises five visions, twelve mandates, and ten parables
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Frederick William Dillistone
Frederick William Dillistone (9 May 1903[1] – 5 October 1993[2]) was the second Dean of Liverpool.[3] Dillistone was educated at Brighton College and Brasenose College, Oxford. Ordained in 1928,[4] he began his ecclesiastical career with a curacy at St Jude’s Southsea. Later he was a tutor at Wycliffe Hall, Oxford and then Vicar of St Andrew's in the same city.[5] From 1938 to 1945 he was Professor of Theology at Wycliffe College, Toronto and from then until 1952 held the same position at the Episcopal Divinity School at Cambridge, Massachusetts. Moving back to England he was Canon Residentiary and Chancellor of Liverpool Cathedral from 1952 to 1956 and then its Dean until 1963.[6] From 1964 until his retirement in 1970, he was Fellow and Chaplain of Oriel College, Oxford
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Walter Brueggemann
Walter Brueggemann (born March 11, 1933) is an American Protestant Old Testament scholar and theologian who is widely considered one of the most influential Old Testament scholars of the last several decades.[1] He is an important figure in modern progressive Christianity whose work often focuses on the Hebrew prophetic tradition and sociopolitical imagination of the Church. He argues that the Church must provide a counter-narrative to the dominant forces of consumerism, militarism, and nationalism.[2][3] Brueggemann was born in Tilden, Nebraska in 1933. He received an A.B. from Elmhurst College (1955), a B.D. from Eden Theological Seminary (1958), a Th.D. from Union Theological Seminary, New York (1961), and Ph.D. from Saint Louis University (in 1974). The son of a minister of the German Evangelical Synod of North America, he was ordained in the United Church of Christ
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First Epistle To The Corinthians
The First Epistle to the Corinthians (Ancient Greek: Α΄ ᾽Επιστολὴ πρὸς Κορινθίους), usually referred to as First Corinthians or 1 Corinthians is a Pauline epistle of the New Testament of the Christian Bible. The epistle is attributed to Paul the Apostle and a co-author named Sosthenes, and is addressed to the Christian church in Corinth.[1 Cor.1:1–2] Scholars believe that Sosthenes was the amanuensis who wrote down the text of the letter at Paul's direction.[1] It addresses various issues that had arisen in the Christian community at Corinth and it is composed in a form of Koine Greek.[2][3][4] Some time before 2 Corinthians was written, Paul paid them a second visit (2 Corinthians 12:14; 13:1) to check some rising disorder (2 Corinthians 2:1; 13:2), and wrote them a letter, now lost (1 Corinthians 5:9)
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Holy Spirit

In Abrahamic religions, the Holy Spirit is an aspect or agent of God, by means of which God communicates with people or acts on them.[citation needed]

The word spirit (from the Latin spiritus meaning "breath") appears either alone or with other words in the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) and the New Testament
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Manifestation Of God (Baháʼí Faith)

The Baháʼí concept of the intermediary between God and humanity is expressed in the term Manifestation of God.[1] Baháʼís believe in a single, imperishable God, the creator of all things, including all the creatures and forces in the universe.[4] Though inaccessible directly, God is nevertheless seen as conscious of his creation, with a mind, will and purpose. Baháʼís believe that God expresses this will at all times and in many ways, including through a series of divine messengers referred to as Manifestations of God.[5] In expressing God's intent, these Manifestations are seen to establish religion in the world.[1] The Manifestations of God are not seen as incarnations of God as God cannot be divided and does not descend to the condition of his creatures, but they are also not seen as ordinary mortals
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Beopheung Of Silla
Beopheung of Silla (r. 514–540 AD) was the 23rd monarch of Silla, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. He was preceded by King Jijeung (r. 500–514) and succeeded by King Jinheung.[1] By the time of his reign, Buddhism had become fairly common in Silla, as it had been introduced much earlier by Goguryeo monks during King Nulji's reign. One of King Beopheung's ministers, a man named Ichadon, was a Buddhist convert who had even shaved his head and took the tonsure. He constantly implored the king to adopt Buddhism as the state religion, and in fact King Beopheung himself had become fond of Buddha's teachings. However, the other ministers of Silla were greatly opposed to this, and expressed such defiance to the king. Beopheung, having been persuaded by his ministers, was at a crossroads, and encountered great reluctance to change
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