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Perinthus
Marmara Ereğlisi
Marmara Ereğlisi
is a town, located in a district bearing the same name, in Tekirdağ Province
Tekirdağ Province
in the Marmara region of Turkey. The mayor[when?] is, as of January 2011[update], Uyan (CHP).Contents1 Facts 2 History 3 Eski Ereğli 4 Holiday resorts 5 The town and villages 6 Earthquakes 7 Economy 8 ReferencesFacts[edit] Ereğli is 30 km east of the town of Tekirdağ, and 90 km west of Istanbul
Istanbul
near a small pointed headland on the north shore of the Marmara Sea
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Ereğli (other)
Ereğli (formerly Erekli) is a Turkish toponym derived from Ancient Greek Ἡράκλεια (Herakleia), in Latin
Latin
Heraclea or Heraclia, [1] named after the hero-born god Heracles. It may refer to :Karadeniz Ereğli, a city and its district in Zonguldak Province, Turkey Konya Ereğlisi, a city and its district in Konya Province, Turkey Marmara Ereğlisi, a city and its district in Tekirdağ Province, European Turkey, formerly archbishopric Heraclea in Europa, a Latin Catholic titular see Ereğli, a small town in Karamürsel
Karamürsel
district of Kocaeli Province in TurkeyLocally, they are all simply called "Ereğli". References[edit]^ Heraclea. Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short
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Ecumenical Patriarchate Of Constantinople
The Ecumenical Patriarchate
Patriarchate
of Constantinople
Constantinople
(Greek: Οἰκουμενικόν Πατριαρχεῖον Κωνσταντινουπόλεως, Oikoumenikón Patriarkhíon Konstantinoupóleos, IPA: [ikumenikˈon patriarˈçion konstandinuˈpoleos]; Latin: Patriarchatus Oecumenicus Constantinopolitanus;[2] Turkish: Rum Ortodoks Patrikhanesi,[3][4] "Roman Orthodox Patriarchate") is one of the fourteen autocephalous churches (or "jurisdictions") that together compose the Eastern Orthodox Church
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Byzantine Emperor
This is a list of the Byzantine emperors from the foundation of Constantinople
Constantinople
in 330 AD, which marks the conventional start of the Byzantine Empire
Byzantine Empire
(or the Eastern Roman Empire), to its fall to the Ottoman Empire
Ottoman Empire
in 1453 AD. Only the emperors who were recognized as legitimate rulers and exercised sovereign authority are included, to the exclusion of junior co-emperors (symbasileis) who never attained the status of sole or senior ruler, as well as of the various usurpers or rebels who claimed the imperial title. Traditionally, the line of Byzantine emperors is held to begin with the Roman Emperor Constantine the Great, the first Christian emperor, who rebuilt the city of Byzantium
Byzantium
as an imperial capital, Constantinople, and who was regarded by the later emperors as the model ruler
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Justinian I
Justinian I
Justinian I
(/dʒʌˈstɪniən/; Latin: Flavius Petrus Sabbatius Iustinianus Augustus; Greek: Φλάβιος Πέτρος Σαββάτιος Ἰουστινιανός Flávios Pétros Sabbátios Ioustinianós; c. 482 – 14 November 565), traditionally known as Justinian the Great and also Saint
Saint
Justinian the Great in the Eastern Orthodox Church,[3][4] was the Eastern Roman emperor from 527 to 565. During his reign, Justinian sought to revive the empire's greatness and reconquer the lost western half of the historical Roman Empire
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Notitia Episcopatuum
The Notitiae Episcopatuum (singular: Notitia Episcopatuum) are official documents that furnish Eastern countries the list and hierarchical rank of the metropolitan and suffragan bishoprics of a church. In the Roman Church (the -mostly Latin Rite- 'Western Patriarchate' of Rom), archbishops and bishops were classed according to the seniority of their consecration, and in Africa according to their age. In the Eastern patriarchates, however, the hierarchical rank of each bishop was determined by the see he occupied. Thus, in the Patriarchate of Constantinople, the first Metropolitan was not the longest ordained, but whoever happened to be the incumbent of the See of Caesarea; the second was the Archbishop
Archbishop
of Ephesus, and so on
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Suffragan See
A suffragan diocese is one of the dioceses other than the metropolitan archdiocese that constitute an ecclesiastical province. It exists in some Christian denominations, in particular the Catholic Church, the Coptic Orthodox Church of Alexandria, and the Romanian Orthodox Church. Although such a diocese is governed by its own bishop or ordinary, the metropolitan archbishop has in its regard certain rights and duties of oversight
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Rumelifeneri, Sarıyer
Rumelifeneri (named after the lighthouse Rumeli Feneri) is a village in İstanbul Province, Turkey.Contents1 Geography 2 History 3 Economy 4 ReferencesGeography[edit] Rumelifeneri is in Sarıyer
Sarıyer
intracity district of Istanbul
Istanbul
Province. At 41°14′N 29°07′E / 41.233°N 29.117°E / 41.233; 29.117 it is a coastal village located at the extreme northwest (i.e., European side) of the Bosphorous
Bosphorous
Strait. It is a suburb of Istanbul. The distance to Sarıyer
Sarıyer
is 10 kilometres (6.2 mi) and to the center of Greater Istanbul
Istanbul
is about 25 kilometres (16 mi)
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Gallipoli
Coordinates: 40°21′N 26°28′E / 40.350°N 26.467°E / 40.350; 26.467Satellite image of the Gallipoli
Gallipoli
peninsula and surrounding areaA view of the Dardanelles
Dardanelles
from a shipThe Gallipoli
Gallipoli
peninsula (/ɡəˈlɪpəli, ɡæ-/;[1] Turkish: Gelibolu Yarımadası; Greek: Χερσόνησος της Καλλίπολης) is located in the southern part of East Thrace, the European part of Turkey, with the Aegean Sea
Aegean Sea
to the west and the Dardanelles
Dardanelles
strait to the east. Gallipoli
Gallipoli
is the Italian form of the Greek name "Καλλίπολις" (Kallípolis), meaning "Beautiful City",[2] the original name of the modern town of Gelibolu
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Rhaedestus
Tekirdağ
Tekirdağ
(pronounced [tekiɾdaɣ]; see also its other names), is a city in Turkey. It is a part of the region historically known as Eastern Thrace. Tekirdağ
Tekirdağ
is the capital of Tekirdağ
Tekirdağ
Province
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Leo VI The Wise
Leo VI, called the Wise or the Philosopher (Greek: Λέων ΣΤ΄ ὁ Σοφός, Leōn VI ho Sophos, 19 September 866 – 11 May 912), was Byzantine Emperor
Byzantine Emperor
from 886 to 912. The second ruler of the Macedonian dynasty (although his parentage is unclear), he was very well-read, leading to his epithet. During his reign, the renaissance of letters, begun by his predecessor Basil I, continued; but the Empire also saw several military defeats in the Balkans against Bulgaria and against the Arabs in Sicily
Sicily
and the Aegean
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Ottoman Empire
The Ottoman Empire (/ˈɒtəmən/; Devlet-i ʿAlīye-i ʿOsmānīye[dn 5]), also historically known in Western Europe
Europe
as the Turkish Empire[8] or simply Turkey,[9] was a state that controlled much of southeastern Europe, western Asia and northern Africa between the 14th and early 20th centuries. It was founded at the end of the 13th century in northwestern Anatolia
Anatolia
in the town of Söğüt (modern-day Bilecik Province) by the Oghuz Turkish tribal leader Osman.[10] After 1354, the Ottomans crossed into Europe, and with the conquest of the Balkans, the Ottoman Beylik was transformed into a transcontinental empire
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Titular See
A titular see in various churches is an episcopal see of a former diocese that no longer functions, sometimes called a "dead diocese". The ordinary or hierarch of such a see may be styled a "titular metropolitan" (highest rank), "titular archbishop" (intermediary rank) or "titular bishop" (lowest rank), which normally goes by the status conferred on the titular see. The term is used to signify a diocese that no longer functionally exists, often because the diocese once flourished but the territory was conquered by Muslims or no longer functions because of a schism. The Greek–Turkish population exchange of 1923 also contributed to titular bishoprics. The see of Maximianoupolis was destroyed along with the town that shared its name by the Bulgarians under Emperor Kaloyan in 1207; the town and the see were under the control of the Latin Empire, which took Constantinople during the Fourth Crusade
Fourth Crusade
in 1204
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Latin Church
The Latin Church, sometimes called the Western Church, is the largest particular church sui iuris in full communion with the Pope
Pope
and the rest of the Catholic Church, tracing its history to the earliest days of Christianity. Employing the Latin liturgical rites, with 1.255 billion members (2015), the Latin Church
Latin Church
is the original and still major part of Western Christianity,[2] in contrast to the Eastern Catholic churches. It is headquartered in the Vatican City, enclaved in Rome, Italy. Historically, the leadership of the Latin Church, i.e., the Holy See, has been viewed as one of the five patriarchates of the Pentarchy
Pentarchy
of early Christianity, along with the patriarchates of Constantinople, Alexandria, Antioch, and Jerusalem
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Byzantium
Byzantium
Byzantium
or Byzantion
Byzantion
(/bɪˈzæntiəm, bɪˈzænʃəm/; Ancient Greek: Βυζάντιον, Byzántion) was an ancient Greek colony in early antiquity that later became Constantinople, and later Istanbul. Byzantium
Byzantium
was colonized by the Greeks
Greeks
from Megara
Megara
in c. 657 BC.Contents1 Name 2 History2.1 Emblem3 Notable people 4 See also 5 References 6 Sources 7 External linksName[edit] The etymology of Byzantion
Byzantion
is unknown
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Catholic Church
GodTrinity Pater Filius Spiritus Sanctus Consubstantialitas Filioque Divinum illud munusDivine Law Decalogus Ex Cathedra DeificatioRealms beyond the States of the Church Heaven Purgatory Limbo HellMysterium Fidei Passion of Jesus Crucifixion
Crucifixion
of Jesus Harrowing of Hell Resurrection AscensionBeatæ Mariæ Semper Virginis Mariology Veneration Immaculate Conception Mater Dei Perpetual virginity Assumption TitlesOther teachings Josephology Morality Body Lectures Sexuality Apologetics Divine grace Salvation Original sin Saints DogmaTexts Biblia Sacra S
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