HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Moorish
The term "Moors" refers primarily to the Muslim
Muslim
inhabitants of the Maghreb, the Iberian Peninsula, Sicily, and Malta
Malta
during the Middle Ages
[...More...]

"Moorish" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Romance Languages
Pontic SteppeDomestication of the horse Kurgan Kurgan
Kurgan
culture Steppe culturesBug-Dniester Sredny Stog Dnieper-Donets Samara Khvalynsk YamnaMikhaylovka cultureCaucasusMaykopEast-AsiaAfanasevoEastern EuropeUsatovo Cernavodă CucuteniNorthern EuropeCorded wareBaden Middle DnieperBronze AgePontic SteppeChariot Yamna Catacomb Multi-cordoned ware Poltavka SrubnaNorthern/Eastern SteppeAbashevo culture Andronovo SintashtaEuropeGlobular Amphora Corded ware Beaker Unetice Trzciniec Nordi
[...More...]

"Romance Languages" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Classical Literature
Classics
Classics
or classical studies is the study of classical antiquity. It encompasses the study of the Greco-Roman world, particularly of its languages and literature ( Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
and Classical Latin) but also of Greco-Roman philosophy, history, and archaeology. Traditionally in the West, the study of the Greek and Roman classics was considered one of the cornerstones of the humanities and a necessary part of a rounded education
[...More...]

"Classical Literature" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Abu Hafs Umar Al-Murtada
Abu Hafs Umar al-Murtada
Abu Hafs Umar al-Murtada
(Arabic: أبو حفص المرتضى عمر بن أبي إبراهيم اسحاق بن يوسف بن عبد المؤمن‎; died 1266) was an Almohad caliph who reigned over part of Morocco
Morocco
from 1248 until his death.Castillian ambassadors attempting to convince al-Murtada to join their alliance. Contemporary depiction from Cantigas de Santa Maria.During his time as caliph, the area of Morocco
Morocco
under Almohad control was reduced to the region around and including Marrakech. He was forced to pay tribute to the Marinids. He was ousted by his cousin Abu al-Ula al-Wathiq Idris with the help of Marinid ruler Abu Yusuf Yaqub ibn Abd Al-Haqq, with Idriss II then proclaiming himself as caliph.A letter from Abu Hafs Umar al-Murtada
Abu Hafs Umar al-Murtada
to Pope Innocent IV.Sources[edit]Julien, Charles-André
[...More...]

"Abu Hafs Umar Al-Murtada" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

History Of Islam In Southern Italy
Timeline Italy
Italy
portalv t ePart of a series on theHistory of MaltaAncient historyGħar Dalam phase Ġgantija phase Saflieni phase Tarxien phase Phoenicians and Carthage Roman ruleMiddle AgesArab period Normans Kingdom of SicilyModern historyKnights Hospitaller Great Siege French occupation Insurrection and independent GozoBritish PeriodBritish Protectorate British Colony World War II From home rule to independenceIndependent MaltaState of Malta Republic of Malta European Union membershipTimeline of Maltese history
[...More...]

"History Of Islam In Southern Italy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Christendom
Christendom[1][2][page needed] has several meanings. In one contemporary sense, as used in a secular or Protestant context, it may refer to the " Christian
Christian
world": worldwide community of Christians,[citation needed] the adherents of Christianity,[citation needed] the Christian-majority countries,[citation needed] the countries in which Christianity
Christianity
dominates[3] or prevails,[1] or, in the Catholic
Catholic
sense of the word, the nations in which Catholic Christianity
Christianity
is the established religion. Since the spread of Christianity
Christianity
from the Levant
Levant
to Europe
Europe
and North Africa during the early Roman Empire, Christendom
Christendom
has been divided in the pre-existing Greek East and Latin West
[...More...]

"Christendom" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Muslim Settlement Of Lucera
The Muslim settlement of Lucera
Lucera
was the result of the decision of Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II of the Hohenstaufen
Hohenstaufen
dynasty (1194–1250) to move 20,000 Sicilian Muslims to Lucera, a settlement in Apulia
Apulia
in southern Italy. The settlement thrived for about 75 years
[...More...]

"Muslim Settlement Of Lucera" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fall Of Granada
Abu l-Hasan Ali (Muley Hacén), 1481–1485 Muhammed XIII (al-Zagal), 1485–1487 Muhammad XII (Boabdil), 1487–1492  (POW)v t eReconquistaCovadonga Roncevaux Pass Burbia River Lutos las Babias Río Quirós Río Nalón Oviedo Pancorbo Clavijo Albelda Guadalacete Monte Laturce Morcuera 1st Cellorigo 2nd Cellorigo Day of Zamora 1st San Esteban de Gormaz 2nd San Esteban de Gormaz Valdejunquera Alhandic Simancas Estercuel Torrevicente Rueda Cervera Calatañazor Torà Albesa Aqbat al-Bakr Graus Tamarón Barbastro Paterna Llantada Golpejera Cabra Piedra Pisada Morella Sagrajas Alcoraz Bairén Consuegra Uclés Cutanda Arnisol Fraga Ourique Oreja al-Ludjdj Montiel 1st Santarém Lisbon 2nd Santarém 1st Silves Alarcos Al-Dāmūs Las Navas de Tolosa 1st Jaén Majorca Portopí 2nd Jaén Jerez Burriana Córdoba El Puig 3rd Jaén Seville Mudéjar revolt Écija Martos 1st Algeciras 2nd Algeciras Moclín Iznalloz 1st Gibraltar 3rd Algeciras 2nd Gibraltar Vega de Granada
[...More...]

"Fall Of Granada" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Roman Empire
Mediolanum
Mediolanum
(286–402, Western) Augusta Treverorum Sirmium Ravenna
Ravenna
(402–476, Western)
[...More...]

"Roman Empire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Melilla
Melilla
Melilla
(/məˈliːjə/ mə-LEE-yə; Spanish: [meˈliʎa], locally [meˈliʝa]; Arabic: مليلية‎, Maliliyyah; Berber languages: ⵎⵔⵉⵜⵙ, Mřič) is a Spanish autonomous city located on the north coast of Africa, sharing a border with Morocco, with an area of 12.3 km2 (4.7 sq mi). Melilla, along with Ceuta, is one of two permanently inhabited Spanish cities in mainland Africa. It was part of the Province of Málaga
Province of Málaga
until 14 March 1995, when the city's Statute of Autonomy was passed. Melilla, like Ceuta, was a free port before Spain
Spain
joined the European Union.[citation needed] In 2011 it had a population of 78,476, made up of Catholics of Iberian origin (primarily from Andalusia
Andalusia
and Catalonia), ethnic Riffian Berbers
Berbers
and a small number of Sephardic Jews and Sindhi Hindus
[...More...]

"Melilla" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Strabo
Strabo[1] (/ˈstreɪboʊ/; Greek: Στράβων Strábōn; 64 or 63 BC – c. AD 24) was a Greek geographer, philosopher, and historian who lived in Asia Minor
Asia Minor
during the transitional period of the Roman Republic
Roman Republic
into the Roman Empire.Contents1 Life 2 Education 3 Geographica 4 Geology 5 Editions 6 Notes 7 References 8 Sources 9 External linksLife[edit]Title page from Isaac Casaubon's 1620 edition of Geographica Strabo
Strabo
was born to an affluent family from Amaseia in Pontus (modern Amasya, Turkey),[2] a city that he said was situated the approximate equivalent of 75 km from the Black Sea
[...More...]

"Strabo" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Septimania
Septimania
Septimania
(French: Septimanie, IPA: [sɛptimani]; Occitan: Septimània, IPA: [septiˈmanjɔ]; Catalan: Septimània, IPA: [səptiˈmaniə]) was the western region of the Roman province of Gallia Narbonensis
Gallia Narbonensis
that passed under the control of the Visigoths
Visigoths
in 462, when Septimania
Septimania
was ceded to their king, Theodoric II. Under the Visigoths
Visigoths
it was known as simply Gallia or Narbonensis. It corresponded roughly with the former administrative region of Languedoc-Roussillon
Languedoc-Roussillon
of modern France
[...More...]

"Septimania" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cornelius Tacitus
Publius (or Gaius) Cornelius Tacitus
Tacitus
(/ˈtæsɪtəs/; Classical Latin: [ˈtakɪtʊs]; c. 56 – c. 120 AD) was a senator and a historian of the Roman Empire. The surviving portions of his two major works—the Annals and the Histories—examine the reigns of the Roman emperors Tiberius, Claudius, Nero, and those who reigned in the Year of the Four Emperors
Year of the Four Emperors
(69 AD). These two works span the history of the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
from the death of Augustus, in 14 AD, to the years of the First Jewish–Roman War, in 70 AD
[...More...]

"Cornelius Tacitus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Anno Domini
The terms anno Domini[a][1][2] (AD) and before Christ[b][3][4][5] (BC) are used to label or number years in the Julian and Gregorian calendars. The term anno Domini is Medieval Latin
Medieval Latin
and means "in the year of the Lord",[6] but is often presented using "our Lord" instead of "the Lord",[7][8] taken from the full original phrase "anno Domini nostri Jesu Christi", which translates to "in the year of our Lord Jesus
Jesus
Christ". This calendar era is based on the traditionally reckoned year of the conception or birth of Jesus
Jesus
of Nazareth, with AD counting years from the start of this epoch, and BC denoting years before the start of the era. There is no year zero in this scheme, so the year AD 1 immediately follows the year 1 BC
[...More...]

"Anno Domini" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Africa (Roman Province)
French Algeria
Algeria
(19th - 20th centuries)French conquest French governorsResistance PacificationEmir Abdelkader Fatma N'SoumerMokrani Revolt Cheikh BouamamaNationalism RCUA FLN GPRAAlgerian War 1958 putsch 1961 putschÉvian Accords Independence referendumPied-Noir Harkis Oujda GroupContemporary era 1960s–80sArab nationalism 1965 putschBerber Spring 1988 Riots1990s
[...More...]

"Africa (Roman Province)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Roman Africans
Roman-Africans are the ancient North African populations that had a Romanized culture and used to speak its own variety of Latin as a result.[1] They were mostly concentrated from the Roman conquest in the antiquity to the late Middle-Ages (approximately the 14th century AD) in all the coastal cities of contemporary Tunisia, Tripolitania and East Algeria, an area which was known under Arab rule as Ifriqiya, from the Roman province of Africa. The Roman Africans were generally local Berbers or Punics, but also the descendants of the populations that came directly from Rome itself or the diverse regions of the Empire as legionaries and senators. Characteristics[edit] The Roman-Africans first adopted the Roman pantheon under the rule of the Roman Republic, but then were one of the first provinces to convert to Christianity and among their most known figures we can mention Saint Felicita, Saint Perpetua, Saint Cyprian and Saint Augustine
[...More...]

"Roman Africans" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.