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Kyushu
Kyushu (九州, Kyūshū, pronounced [kʲɯꜜːɕɯː] (listen), literally "Nine Provinces") is the third largest island of Japan's five main islands and the most southerly of the four largest islands (excluding Okinawa).[2][3] In the past, it has been known as Kyūkoku (九国, "Nine Countries"), Chinzei (鎮西, "West of the Pacified Area") and Tsukushi-no-shima (筑紫島, "Island of Tsukushi"). The historical regional name Saikaidō (西海道, lit
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Higo Province
Higo Province (肥後国, Higo no kuni) was an old province of Japan in the area that is today Kumamoto Prefecture on the island of Kyūshū.[1] It was sometimes called Hishū (肥州), with Hizen Province. Higo bordered on Chikugo, Bungo, Hyūga, Ōsumi, and Satsuma Provinces. In the Meiji period, the provinces of Japan were converted into prefectures. Maps of Japan and Higo Province were reformed in the 1870s.[4] At the same time, the province continued to exist for some purposes
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Taihō Code

The Taihō Code established two branches of government: the Department of Worship (神祇官, Jingi-kan) and the Department of State (太政官, Daijō-kan). The Jingi-kan was the higher branch, taking precedence over the Daijō-kan and handled all spiritual, religious, or ritualistic matters. The Daijō-kan handled all secular and administrative matters. The Jingi-kan, or Department of Worship, was responsible for annual festivals and official court ceremonies such as coronations, as well as the upkeep of shrines, the discipline of shrine wardens, and the recording and observation of oracles and divinations. It is important to note that the department, though it governed all the Shintō shrines in the country, had no connection with Buddhism. The Daijō-kan, or Department of State, handled all secular matters and was headed by the Great Council of State, which was presided over by the Daijō-daijin (太政大臣, Chancellor)
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Circuit (country Subdivision)
A circuit (Chinese: ; pinyin: dào or Chinese: ; pinyin: ) was a historical political division of China and is a historical and modern administrative unit in Japan. The primary level of administrative division of Korea under the Joseon and in modern North and South Korea employs the same Chinese character as the Chinese and Japanese divisions but, because of its relatively greater importance, is usually translated as province instead. During the Asuka period (538–710), Japan was organized into five provinces and seven circuits, known as the Gokishichidō (5 ki 7 dō), as part of a legal and governmental system borrowed from the Chinese.[3] Though these units did not survive as administrative structures beyond the Muromachi period (1336–1573), they did remain important geographical entities until the 19th century
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Saikaidō
Saikaidō (西海道, "western sea circuit" or "western sea region") is a Japanese geographical term.[1] It means both an ancient division of the country and the main road running through it.[2] Saikaido was one of the main circuits of the Gokishichidō system, which was originally established during the Asuka period. This name identified the geographic region of Kyūshū and the islands of Tsushima and Iki
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Chikugo Province
Chikugo Province (筑後国, Chikugo no kuni) is the name of a former province of Japan in the area that is today the southern part of Fukuoka Prefecture on Kyūshū.[1] It was sometimes called Chikushū (筑州), with Chikuzen Province. Chikugo was bordered by Hizen, Chikuzen, Bungo, and Higo Provinces. The ancient capital of the province was located near the modern city of Kurume, Fukuoka. In the Edo period the province was divided into two fiefs: the Tachibana clan held a southern fief at Yanagawa, and the Arima clan held a northern fief at Kurume. In the Meiji period, the provinces of Japan were converted into prefectures
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Hot Spring
A hot spring, hydrothermal spring, or geothermal spring is a spring produced by the emergence of geothermally heated groundwater that rises from the Earth's crust. While some of these springs contain water that is a safe temperature for bathing, others are hot enough that immersion can be harmful, i.e., lead to scalding and, potentially, a death. There is no universally accepted definition of a hot spring. For example, one can find the phrase hot spring defined as


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Hizen Province
Hizen Province (肥前国, Hizen no kuni) was an old province of Japan in the area of Saga and Nagasaki prefectures.[1] It was sometimes called Hishū (肥州), with Higo Province. Hizen bordered on the provinces of Chikuzen and Chikugo. The province was included in Saikaidō. It did not include the regions of Tsushima and Iki that are now part of modern Nagasaki Prefecture. The name "Hizen" dates from the Nara period Ritsuryō Kokugunri system reforms, when the province was divided from Higo Province. The name appears in the early chronicle Shoku Nihongi from 696 AD. The ancient provincial capital of Hizen was located near Yamato City. During the late Muromachi period, the province was the site of much early contact between Japan and Portuguese and Spanish merchants and missionaries
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Buzen Province
Buzen Province (豊前国, Buzen no kuni) was an old province of Japan in northern Kyūshū in the area of Fukuoka Prefecture and Ōita Prefecture.[1] It was sometimes called Hōshū (豊州), with Bungo Province. Buzen bordered on Bungo and Chikuzen Provinces. The ruins of the ancient capital of the province were found near Toyotsu, Fukuoka. The castle town of Kokura was also in Buzen, and a seat of many feudal rulers.
View of Buzen Province, woodblock print by Hiroshige, 1854
In the Meiji period, the provinces of Japan were converted into prefectures
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Bungo Province
Bungo Province (豊後国, Bungo no kuni) was a province of Japan in eastern Kyūshū in the area of Ōita Prefecture.[1] It was sometimes called Hōshū (豊州), with Buzen Province. Bungo bordered Buzen, Hyūga, Higo, Chikugo, and Chikuzen Provinces. At the end of the 7th century, Toyo Province was split into Buzen (literally, "the front of Toyo") and Bungo ("the back of Toyo"). Until the Heian period, Bungo was read as Toyokuni no Michi no Shiri. It is believed that the capital of Bungo was located in Furugō (古国府), literally "old capital," section of the city of Ōita, but as of 2016 no archaeological evidence has been found. The honor of the holiest Shinto shrine of Bungo Province (豊前一宮, Buzen ichinomiya) was given to Usa Shrine known as Usa Hachimangu or Usa Jingu in Usa district (today Usa, Ōita)
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Satsuma Province
Satsuma Province (薩摩国, Satsuma-no Kuni) was an old province of Japan that is now the western half of Kagoshima Prefecture on the island of Kyūshū.[1] Its abbreviation is Sasshū (薩州). Satsuma's provincial capital was Satsumasendai. During the Sengoku period, Satsuma was a fief of the Shimazu daimyō, who ruled much of southern Kyūshū from their castle at Kagoshima city
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