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Philistion Of Locri
Philistion of Locri (Greek: Φιλιστίων) was a physician and writer on medicine who lived in the 4th century BC. He was a native of Locri in Italy,[1] but was also referred to as "the Sicilian."[2] He was tutor to the physician Chrysippus of Cnidos,[3] and the astronomer and physician Eudoxus,[4] and therefore must have lived in the 4th century BC. He was one of those who defended the opinion that what is drunk goes into the lungs.[5] Some ancient writers attributed to Philistion the treatise De Salubri Victus Ratione,[6] and also the De Victus Ratione,[7] both of which form part of the Hippocratic collection
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Empedocles

Empedocles (/ɛmˈpɛdəklz/; Greek: Ἐμπεδοκλῆς Empedocles (/ɛmˈpɛdəklz/; Greek: Ἐμπεδοκλῆς [empedoklɛ̂ːs], Empedoklēs; c. 494 – c. 434 BC, fl. 444–443 BC)[7] was a Greek pre-Socratic philosopher and a native citizen of Akragas,[8][9] a Greek city in Sicily. Empedocles' philosophy is best known for originating the cosmogonic theory of the four classical elements
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Hippocrates
Hippocrates of Kos (/hɪˈpɒkrətz/; Greek: Ἱπποκράτης ὁ Κῷος, translit. Hippokrátēs ho Kṓos; c. 460 – c. 370 BC), also known as Hippocrates II, was a Greek physician of the Age of Pericles (Classical Greece), who is considered one of the most outstanding figures in the history of medicine. He is often referred to as the "Father of Medicine"[1] in recognition of his lasting contributions to the field as the founder of the Hippocratic School of Medicine
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Tricuspid Valve
The tricuspid valve, or right atrioventricular valve, is on the right dorsal side of the mammalian heart, at the superior portion of the right ventricle. The function of the valve is to prevent back flow (regurgitation) of blood from the right ventricle into the right atrium during right ventricular contraction: systole. The tricuspid valve usually has three leaflets, named the anterior, posterior, and septal leaflets.[1] Each leaflet is connected via chordae tendineae to the anterior, posterior, and septal papillary muscles of the right ventricle, respectively. Tricuspid valves may also occur with two or four leaflets; the number may change over a lifetime.[2] The tricuspid valve functions as a one-way valve that closes during ventricular systole to prevent regurgitation of blood from the right ventricle back into the right atrium
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Saliva
Saliva (commonly referred to as spit) is an extracellular fluid produced and secreted by salivary glands in the mouth. In humans, saliva is 99.5⁠% water plus electrolytes, mucus, white blood cells, epithelial cells (from which DNA can be extracted), enzymes (such as amylase and lipase), antimicrobial agents such as secretory IgA, and lysozymes.[1] The enzymes found in saliva are essential in beginning the process of digestion of dietary starches and fats
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Herophilos
Herophilos (/hɪˈrɒfɪləs/; Greek: Ἡρόφιλος; 335–280 BC), sometimes Latinised Herophilus, was a Greek physician deemed to be among the earliest anatomists. Born in Chalcedon, he spent the majority of his life in Alexandria. He was the first scientist to systematically perform scientific dissections of human cadavers. He recorded his findings in over nine works, which are now all lost. The early Christian author Tertullian states that Herophilos vivisected at least 600 live prisoners.[1] Herophilos was born in Chalcedon in Asia Minor (now Kadiköy, Turkey), c. 335 BC
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Erasistratus
Erasistratus (/ˌɛrəˈsɪstrətəs/; Greek: Ἐρασίστρατος; c. 304 – c. 250 BC) was a Greek anatomist and royal physician under Seleucus I Nicator of Syria. Along with fellow physician Herophilus, he founded a school of anatomy in Alexandria, where they carried out anatomical research
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