HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Havelock Ellis
Henry Havelock Ellis, known as Havelock Ellis
Havelock Ellis
(2 February 1859 – 8 July 1939), was an English physician, writer, progressive intellectual and social reformer who studied human sexuality. He co-authored the first medical textbook in English on homosexuality in 1897, and also published works on a variety of sexual practices and inclinations, as well as on transgender psychology. He is credited[by whom?] with introducing the notions of narcissism and autoeroticism, later adopted by psychoanalysis. Ellis was among the pioneering investigators of psychedelic drugs and the author of one of the first written reports to the public about an experience with mescaline, which he conducted on himself in 1896
[...More...]

"Havelock Ellis" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Croydon
Croydon
Croydon
is a large town in the south of Greater London, England, 9.5 miles (15.3 km) south of Charing Cross. The principal settlement in the London Borough of Croydon, it is one of the largest commercial districts outside Central London, with an extensive shopping district and night-time economy.[2] Its population of 52,104 at the 2011 census includes the wards of Addiscombe, Broad Green, and Fairfield. Historically part of the hundred of Wallington in the county of Surrey, at the time of the Norman conquest of England
England
Croydon
Croydon
had a church, a mill, and around 365 inhabitants, as recorded in the Domesday Book
Domesday Book
of 1086.[3] Croydon
Croydon
expanded in the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
as a market town and a centre for charcoal production, leather tanning and brewing
[...More...]

"Croydon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sigmund Freud
Sigmund Freud
Freud
(/frɔɪd/ FROYD;[3] German: [ˈziːkmʊnt ˈfʁɔʏt]; born Sigismund Schlomo Freud; 6 May 1856 – 23 September 1939) was an Austrian neurologist and the founder of psychoanalysis, a clinical method for treating psychopathology through dialogue between a patient and a psychoanalyst.[4] Freud
Freud
was born to Galician Jewish
Jewish
parents in the Moravian town of Freiberg, in the Austrian Empire. He qualified as a doctor of medicine in 1881 at the University of Vienna.[5][6] Upon completing his habilitation in 1885, he was appointed a docent in neuropathology and became an affiliated professor in 1902.[7] Freud
Freud
lived and worked in Vienna, having set up his clinical practice there in 1886. In 1938 Freud
Freud
left Austria to escape the Nazis
[...More...]

"Sigmund Freud" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

St Thomas's Hospital Medical School
St Thomas's Hospital Medical School
St Thomas's Hospital Medical School
in London
London
was one of the oldest and most prestigious medical schools in the UK. The school was absorbed to form part of King's College London.Contents1 History 2 Name 3 Departments 4 Notable people4.1 Notable former members of staff 4.2 Notable alumni5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] It was part of one of the oldest hospitals in London, St Thomas' Hospital established in 1173 but whose roots can be traced to the establishment of St Mary Overie
St Mary Overie
Priory in 1106.[1][2][3] According to historical records St Thomas's Hospital Medical School
St Thomas's Hospital Medical School
was founded in about 1550
[...More...]

"St Thomas's Hospital Medical School" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Mermaid Series
The Mermaid Series was a major collection of reprints of texts from English Elizabethan, Jacobean and Restoration drama. It was launched in 1887 by the British publisher Henry Vizetelly and under the general editorship of Havelock Ellis.[1] Around 1894 the series was taken over by the London firm of T. Fisher Unwin. Many well-known literary figures edited or introduced the texts. Some of the plays published had not been reprinted in recent editions, and most had dropped out of the stage repertoire. The name alludes to the Mermaid Tavern in London
[...More...]

"Mermaid Series" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

The Fellowship Of The New Life
The Fellowship of the New Life was a British organization in the 19th century, most famous for a splinter group, the Fabian Society. It was founded in 1883, by the Scottish intellectual Thomas Davidson.[1] Fellowship members included poets Edward Carpenter and John Davidson, animal rights activist Henry Stephens Salt,[2] sexologist Havelock Ellis, feminist Edith Lees (who later married Ellis), novelist Olive Schreiner[3] and future Fabian secretary Edward R. Pease. Future UK Prime Minister Ramsay MacDonald was briefly a member. According to MacDonald, the Fellowship's main influences were Henry David Thoreau and Ralph Waldo Emerson.[4] The Fellowship published a journal called Seed-Time. Its objective was "The cultivation of a perfect character in each and all." They wanted to transform society by setting an example of clean simplified living for others to follow
[...More...]

"The Fellowship Of The New Life" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Eleanor Marx
Jenny Julia Eleanor Marx
Eleanor Marx
(16 January 1855 – 31 March 1898), sometimes called Eleanor Aveling and known to her family as Tussy, was the English-born youngest daughter of Karl Marx. She was herself a socialist activist who sometimes worked as a literary translator. In March 1898, after discovering that Edward Aveling, her partner and a prominent British Marxist, had secretly married a young actress in June of the previous year, she committed suicide by poison
[...More...]

"Eleanor Marx" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Edward Carpenter
Edward Carpenter
Edward Carpenter
(29 August 1844 – 28 June 1929) was an English socialist poet, philosopher, anthologist, and early activist for rights for homosexuals.[1] A poet and writer, he was a close friend of Rabindranath Tagore, and a friend of Walt Whitman.[2] He corresponded with many famous figures such as Annie Besant, Isadora Duncan, Havelock Ellis, Roger Fry, Mahatma Gandhi, Keir Hardie, J. K. Kinney, Jack London, George Merrill, E. D. Morel, William Morris, Edward R. Pease, John Ruskin, and Olive Schreiner.[3] As a philosopher he was particularly known for his publication of Civilisation, Its Cause and Cure in which he proposes that civilisation is a form of disease that human societies pass through.[4] An early advocate of sexual freedoms, he had an influence on both D. H. Lawrence and Sri Aurobindo, and inspired E. M
[...More...]

"Edward Carpenter" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

George Bernard Shaw
George Bernard Shaw
George Bernard Shaw
(26 July 1856 – 2 November 1950), known at his insistence simply as Bernard Shaw, was an Irish playwright, critic, polemicist, and political activist. His influence on Western theatre, culture and politics extended from the 1880s to his death and beyond. He wrote more than sixty plays, including major works such as Man and Superman
Man and Superman
(1902), Pygmalion (1912) and Saint Joan (1923). With a range incorporating both contemporary satire and historical allegory, Shaw became the leading dramatist of his generation, and in 1925 was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature. Born in Dublin, Shaw moved to London in 1876, where he struggled to establish himself as a writer and novelist, and embarked on a rigorous process of self-education. By the mid-1880s he had become a respected theatre and music critic
[...More...]

"George Bernard Shaw" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

John Addington Symonds
John Addington Symonds (/ˈsɪməndz/; 5 October 1840 – 19 April 1893) was an English poet and literary critic. A cultural historian, he was known for his work on the Renaissance, as well as numerous biographies of writers and artists. Although he married and had a family, he was an early advocate of male love (homosexuality), which he believed could include pederastic as well as egalitarian relationships, referring to it as l'amour de l'impossible (love of the impossible).[1] He also wrote much poetry inspired by his homosexual affairs.Contents1 Biography1.1 Early life 1.2 Personal life 1.3 Career2 Legacy 3 Homosexuality and homosexual writings 4 Works 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksBiography[edit] Early life[edit] Symonds was born at Bristol, England in 1840. His father, the senior John Addington Symonds, M.D. (1807–1871), was the author of Criminal Responsibility (1869), The Principles of Beauty (1857) and Sleep and Dreams
[...More...]

"John Addington Symonds" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Taboos
A taboo is a vehement prohibition of an action based on the belief that such behavior is either too sacred or too accursed for ordinary individuals to undertake.[1][2] Such prohibitions are present in virtually all societies.[1] On a comparative basis taboos, for example related to food items, seem to make no sense at all as what may be declared unfit for one group by custom or religion may be perfectly acceptable to another. Whether scientifically correct or not, taboos are often meant to protect the human individual, but there are numerous other reasons for their existence. An ecological or medical background is apparent in many, including some that are seen as religious or spiritual in origin. Taboos can help utilize a resource more efficiently, but when applied to only a subsection of the community they can also serve to suppress a subsection of the community
[...More...]

"Taboos" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Hybrid Word
A hybrid word is a word that etymologically derives from at least two languages.Contents1 Common hybrids 2 English examples 3 Non-English examples3.1 Modern Hebrew 3.2 Japanese4 See also 5 NotesCommon hybrids[edit] The most common form of hybrid word in English combines Latin
Latin
and Greek parts
[...More...]

"Hybrid Word" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Autoerotism
Autoeroticism is the practice of becoming sexually stimulated through internal stimuli. The term was popularized toward the end of the 19th century by British sexologist Havelock Ellis, who defined autoeroticism as "the phenomena of spontaneous sexual emotion generated in the absence of an external stimulus proceeding, directly or indirectly, from another person".[1] The most common autoerotic practice is masturbation
[...More...]

"Autoerotism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Radclyffe Hall
Marguerite Radclyffe Hall
Radclyffe Hall
(12 August 1880 – 7 October 1943) was an English poet and author
[...More...]

"Radclyffe Hall" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

The Well Of Loneliness
The Well of Loneliness
The Well of Loneliness
is a lesbian novel by British author Radclyffe Hall that was first published in 1928 by Jonathan Cape. It follows the life of Stephen Gordon, an Englishwoman from an upper-class family whose "sexual inversion" (homosexuality) is apparent from an early age. She finds love with Mary Llewellyn, whom she meets while serving as an ambulance driver in World War I, but their happiness together is marred by social isolation and rejection, which Hall depicts as typically suffered by "inverts", with predictably debilitating effects
[...More...]

"The Well Of Loneliness" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.