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Dutch-based Creole Languages
A Dutch creole is a creole language that has been substantially influenced by the Dutch language. Most Dutch-based creoles originated in Dutch colonies in the Americas and Southeast Asia, after the 17th century expansion of Dutch maritime power. Almost all of them are now extinct. List[edit] Some important Dutch creoles are the following:Creole Location StatusBerbice Guyana extinctSkepi Guyana extinctNegerhollands U.S
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Creole Language
A creole language,[1][2][3] or simply creole, is a stable natural language developed from a mixture of different languages at a fairly sudden point in time: often, a pidgin transitioned into a full, native language. While the concept is similar to that of a mixed or hybrid language, in the strict sense of the term, a mixed/hybrid language has derived from two or more languages, to such an extent that it is no longer closely related to the source languages. Creoles also differ from pidgins in that, while a pidgin has a highly simplified linguistic structure that develops as a means of establishing communication between two or more disparate language groups, a creole language is more complex, used for day-to-day purposes in a community, and acquired by children as a native language
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Lat
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Differences Between Afrikaans And Dutch
Afrikaans is a daughter language of Dutch[1][2][3][4][5] and—unlike Netherlands Dutch, Belgian Dutch and Surinamese Dutch—a separate standard language rather than a national variety.[6][7][8] As an estimated 90 to 95% of Afrikaans vocabulary is ultimately of Dutch origin,[9][10][11] there are few lexical differences between the two languages;[12] however, Afrikaans has a considerably more regular morphology,[8] grammar, and spelling.[13]Contents1 Mutual intelligibility1.1 Intelligibility of Afrikaans to Dutch speakers1.1.1 Cognate words 1.1.2 Verb forms 1.1.3 Unmarked and marked forms of words1.2 Intelligibility of Dutch to Afrikaans speakers1.2.1 Loanwords vs purisms 1.2.2 Words of Dutch and non-Dutch origin2 Orthographic differences2.1 Afrikaans simplifications2.1.1 Replacement of ⟨c⟩ and ⟨ch⟩ 2.1.2 Transliteration of loanwords 2.1.3 Use of ⟨k⟩ instead of soft ⟨c⟩ 2.1.4 Changes to digraph ⟨ij⟩ 2.1.
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West Central German
West Central German
Central German
(German: Westmitteldeutsche Dialekte) belongs to the Central, High German dialect family in the German language
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Variety (linguistics)
In sociolinguistics a variety, also called a lect, is a specific form of a language or language cluster. This may include languages, dialects, registers, styles or other forms of language, as well as a standard variety.[1] The use of the word "variety" to refer to the different forms avoids the use of the term language, which many people associate only with the standard language, and the term dialect, which is often associated with non-standard varieties thought of as less prestigious or "correct" than the standard.[2] Linguists speak of both standard and non-standard varieties
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Pennsylvania Dutch
The Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
Dutch (Pennsilfaanisch Deitsch,  listen (help·info)) are a cultural group formed by early German-speaking immigrants to Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
and their descendants. The word "Dutch" does not refer to the Dutch people
Dutch people
or Dutch language, but to the German settlers, known as Deutsch (in standard German) and Deitsch (in the principal dialect they spoke, Palatine German). Most emigrated to the Americas from Germany
Germany
or Switzerland
Switzerland
in the 17th and 18th century. Over time, the various dialects spoken by these immigrants fused into a unique dialect of German known as Pennsylvania German or Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
"Dutch"
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Sranan Tongo
Sranan Tongo
Sranan Tongo
(also Sranantongo "Surinamese tongue", Sranan, Surinaams, Surinamese, Surinamese Creole, Taki Taki) is an English-based creole language spoken as a lingua franca by approximately 500,000 people in Suriname.[1] Because the language is shared between the Dutch-, Indigenous-, Javanese-, Hindustani-, and Chinese-speaking communities, most Surinamese speak it as a lingua franca among both the Surinamese in Suriname, a former Dutch colony, and the immigrants of Surinamese origin in the Netherlands, the United States, and the United Kingdom.Contents<
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Suriname
Coordinates: 4°N 56°W / 4°N 56°W / 4; -56 Republic
Republic
of Suriname Republiek Suriname  (Dutch)FlagCoat of armsMotto: " Justitia
Justitia

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Saramaccan Language
Saramaccan (autonym: Saamáka) is a creole language spoken by about 58,000 ethnic African people near the Saramacca and upper Suriname River, as well as in the capital Paramaribo, in Suriname
Suriname
(formerly also known as Dutch Guiana), 25,000 in French Guiana, and 8,000 in the Netherlands.[2] It has three main dialects. The speakers are mostly descendants of fugitive slaves who were native to West and Central Africa; they form a group called Saamacca, also spelled Saramaka. Linguists consider Saramaccan notable because its vocabulary is based on two European source languages, English (30%) and Portuguese (20%), and various West and Central African languages
African languages
(50%) but diverges considerably from all of these. The African component accounts for about 50% once ritual use is taken into account, the highest percentage in the Americas
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Curaçao
Curaçao
Curaçao
(/ˈkʊrəsaʊ/ KUR-ə-sow or /ˈkjʊərəsaʊ/ KEWR-ə-sow; Dutch: Curaçao, pronounced [kyːraːˈsʌu̯, kuːraːˈsʌu̯];[6] Papiamento: Kòrsou, pronounced [ˈkorsou]) is a Lesser Antilles island in the southern Caribbean
Caribbean
Sea and the Dutch Caribbean
Caribbean
region, about 65 km (40 mi) north of the Venezuelan coast. It is a constituent country (Dutch: land) of the Kingdom of the Netherlands. The country was formerly part of the Curaçao and Dependencies
Curaçao and Dependencies
colony (1815–1954) and is now formally called the Country
Country
of Curaçao (Dutch: Land Curaçao;[7] Papiamento: Pais Kòrsou);[8] it includes the main island of Curaçao
Curaçao
and the uninhabited island of Klein Curaçao
Curaçao
("Little Curaçao")
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Bonaire
Coordinates: 12°11′N 68°15′W / 12.183°N 68.250°W / 12.183; -68.250Public Body of Bonaire Openbaar lichaam Bonaire  (Dutch) Entidat públiko Boneiru  (Papiamento) Special
Special
municipality of the NetherlandsFlagCoat of armsAnthem: "Tera di Solo y suave biento"Location of  Bonaire  (circled in red) in the Caribbean  (light yellow)Coordinates: 12°9′N 68°16′W / 12.150°N 68.267°W / 12.150; -68.267Country NetherlandsIncorporated into the N
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Aruba
Aruba
Aruba
(/əˈruːbə/ ə-ROO-bə; Dutch: [aːˈrubaː], Papiamento: [aˈruba])) is an island and a constituent country of the Kingdom of the Netherlands
Kingdom of the Netherlands
in the southern Caribbean
Caribbean
Sea, located about 1,600 kilometres (990 mi) west of the main part of the Lesser Antilles
Lesser Antilles
and 29 kilometres (18 mi)[5] north of the coast of Venezuela. It measures 32 kilometres (20 mi) long from its northwestern to its southeastern end and 10 kilometres (6 mi) across at its widest point.[5] Together with Bonaire
Bonaire
and Curaçao, Aruba
Aruba
forms a group referred to as the ABC islands
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Papiamento
Papiamento
Papiamento
(English: /ˌpɑːpiəˈmɛntoʊ, ˌpæp-/)[4] or Papiamentu (English: /-ˈmɛntuː/) is a Portuguese-based creole language spoken in the Dutch West Indies. It is the most-widely spoken language on the Caribbean
Caribbean
ABC islands, having official status in Aruba and Curaçao
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Jersey Dutch
Jersey Dutch was an archaic Dutch dialect
Dutch dialect
formerly spoken in and around Bergen and Passaic counties in New Jersey
New Jersey
from the late 17th century until the early 20th century. It may have been a partial creole language[2] based on Zeelandic
Zeelandic
and West Flemish
West Flemish
Dutch dialects with English and possibly some elements of Lenape. Jersey Dutch was spoken by the descendants of Dutch settlers in New Jersey, who began to arrive at Bergen in 1630, and by their black slaves and free people of color also residing in that region, as well as the mixed race people known as the Ramapough Mountain Indians. A variety of this dialect, referred to by Jersey Dutch speakers as neger-dauts ("Negro Dutch", not to be confused with the Dutch creole Negerhollands) was spoken only by the Black population
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