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Droseraceae
Aldrovanda Dionaea Drosera †?Droserapollis †?Droserapites †?Droseridites †?Fischeripollis †?Palaeoaldrovanda †?Saxonipollis Droseraceae
Droseraceae
is a family of flowering plants. The family is also known as the sundew family. It is a small family of carnivorous plants, which consist of approximately 180 species in three extant genera:[2]Contents1 Description1.1 Drosera 1.2 Dionaea 1.3 Aldrovanda2 Phylogeny 3 References 4 External linksDescription[edit] Most of the members of Droseraceae
Droseraceae
are contained in Drosera, the true sundews. Both Dionaea and Aldrovanda
Aldrovanda
have only one extant species. Droseras secrete a sticky substance from their leaves that traps prey. Dionaea and Aldrovanda
Aldrovanda
both use snap-traps that close rapidly when the leaves are disturbed, Dionaea is terrestrial, while Aldrovanda
Aldrovanda
is strictly aquatic
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Late Cretaceous
The Late Cretaceous
Cretaceous
(100.5–66 Ma) is the younger of two epochs into which the Cretaceous
Cretaceous
period is divided in the geologic timescale. Rock strata from this epoch form the Upper Cretaceous
Cretaceous
series
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Nepenthaceae
See below or separate list.Diversity[2]150+ speciesSynonymsAnurosperma Hallier f. Bandura Adans. Phyllamphora Lour. Nepenthes
Nepenthes
(/nɪˈpɛnθiːz/), also known as tropical pitcher plants, is a genus of carnivorous plants in the monotypic family Nepenthaceae. The genus comprises roughly 150 species,[3] and numerous natural and many cultivated hybrids. They are mostly liana-forming plants of the Old World
Old World
tropics, ranging from South China, Indonesia, Malaysia
Malaysia
and the Philippines; westward to Madagascar
Madagascar
(two species) and the Seychelles
Seychelles
(one); southward to Australia
Australia
(three) and New Caledonia (one); and northward to India
India
(one) and Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka
(one)
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Charles Darwin
Tertiary education: University of Edinburgh Medical School
University of Edinburgh Medical School
(medicine, no degree) Christ's College, Cambridge
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Core Eudicots
The eudicots, Eudicotidae or eudicotyledons are a clade of flowering plants that had been called tricolpates or non-magnoliid dicots by previous authors. The botanical terms were introduced in 1991 by evolutionary botanist James A. Doyle and paleobotanist Carol L. Hotton to emphasize the later evolutionary divergence of tricolpate dicots from earlier, less specialized, dicots.[1] The close relationships among flowering plants with tricolpate pollen grains was initially seen in morphological studies of shared derived characters. These plants have a distinct trait in their pollen grains of exhibiting three colpi or grooves paralleling the polar axis. Later molecular evidence confirmed the genetic basis for the evolutionary relationships among flowering plants with tricolpate pollen grains and dicotyledonous traits. The term means "true dicotyledons", as it contains the majority of plants that have been considered dicots and have characteristics of the dicots
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Caryophyllineae
Caryophyllineae
Caryophyllineae
is a suborder of flowering plants.Contents1 Systematics1.1 See also2 References 3 External linksSystematics[edit] Caryophyllales
Caryophyllales
is separated into 2 sub-orders: Caryophyllineae
Caryophyllineae
and Polygonineae
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Cactaceae
See also Classification of the CactaceaeSynonyms[2]Opuntiaceae Desv. Leuchtenbergiaceae Salm-Dyck ex Pfeiff.Cultivated cacti in the Singapore Botanic GardensMany species of cactus have long, sharp spines, like this Opuntia.A cactus (plural: cacti, cactuses, or cactus)[3] is a member of the plant family Cactaceae,[Note 1] a family comprising about 127 genera with some 1750 known species of the order Caryophyllales.[4] The word "cactus" derives, through Latin, from the Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
κάκτος, kaktos, a name originally used by Theophrastus
Theophrastus
for a spiny plant whose identity is not certain.[5] Cacti occur in a wide range of shapes and sizes. Most cacti live in habitats subject to at least some drought. Many live in extremely dry environments, even being found in the Atacama Desert, one of the driest places on earth. Cacti show many adaptations to conserve water
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Amaranthaceae
Amaranthaceae
Amaranthaceae
is a family of flowering plants commonly known as the amaranth family
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Pollen
Pollen
Pollen
is a fine to coarse powdery substance comprising pollen grains which are male microgametophytes of seed plants, which produce male gametes (sperm cells). Pollen
Pollen
grains have a hard coat made of sporopollenin that protects the gametophytes during the process of their movement from the stamens to the pistil of flowering plants, or from the male cone to the female cone of coniferous plants. If pollen lands on a compatible pistil or female cone, it germinates, producing a pollen tube that transfers the sperm to the ovule containing the female gametophyte. Individual pollen grains are small enough to require magnification to see detail
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Liana
A liana is any of various long-stemmed, woody vines that are rooted in the soil at ground level and use trees, as well as other means of vertical support, to climb up to the canopy to get access to well-lit areas of the forest.[1] Lianas are characteristic of tropical moist deciduous forests (especially seasonal forests), but may be found in temperate rainforests. There are also temperate lianas, for example the members of the Clematis
Clematis
or Vitis
Vitis
(wild grape) genera. Lianas can form bridges amidst the forest canopy, providing arboreal animals with paths across the forest. These bridges can protect weaker trees from strong winds
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Triphyophyllum
Triphyophyllum
Triphyophyllum
/ˌtrɪfioʊˈfɪləm/ is a monotypic plant genus, containing the single species Triphyophyllum
Triphyophyllum
peltatum of the family Dioncophyllaceae. It is native to tropical western Africa, in Ivory Coast, Sierra Leone
Sierra Leone
and Liberia, growing in tropical forests. It is a liana, with a three-stage lifecycle, each with a different shaped leaf, as indicated by its Greek name. In the first stage, T. peltatum forms a rosette of simple lanceolate leaves with wavey margins, and looks nondescript
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Triphyophyllum Peltatum
Triphyophyllum /ˌtrɪfioʊˈfɪləm/ is a monotypic plant genus, containing the single species Triphyophyllum peltatum of the family Dioncophyllaceae. It is native to tropical western Africa, in Ivory Coast, Sierra Leone and Liberia, growing in tropical forests. It is a liana, with a three-stage lifecycle, each with a different shaped leaf, as indicated by its Greek name. In the first stage, T. peltatum forms a rosette of simple lanceolate leaves with wavey margins, and looks nondescript. However, it then additionally develops long, slender, glandular leaves mostly in February and March, resembling those of the related Drosophyllum, which capture insects; one to three of these leaves in each rosette.[1] The plant then enters its adult liana form, with short non-carnivorous leaves bearing a pair of grappling hooks [2] at the tip on a long twining stem which can become 165 feet (50 meters) in length and four inches (10 cm) thick.[3] T
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Trichome
Trichomes (/ˈtraɪkoʊmz/ or /ˈtrɪkoʊmz/), from the Greek τρίχωμα (trichōma) meaning "hair", are fine outgrowths or appendages on plants, algae, lichens, and certain protists. They are of diverse structure and function. Examples are hairs, glandular hairs, scales, and papillae. A covering of any kind of hair on a plant is an indumentum, and the surface bearing them is said to be pubescent.Contents1 Algal trichomes 2 Plant
Plant
trichomes2.1 Aerial surface hairs3 Trichome
Trichome
and Root
Root
Hair
Hair
Development 4 Significance for taxonomy 5 Significance for plant molecular biology 6 Uses 7 Defense7.1 Stinging trichomes8 See also 9 ReferencesAlgal trichomes[edit] Certain, usually filamentous, algae have the terminal cell produced into an elongate hair-like structure called a trichome
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Clade
A clade (from Ancient Greek: κλάδος, klados, "branch") is a group of organisms that consists of a common ancestor and all its lineal descendants, and represents a single "branch" on the "tree of life".[1] The common ancestor may be an individual, a population, a species (extinct or extant), and so on right up to a kingdom and further. Clades are nested, one in another, as each branch in turn splits into smaller branches. These splits reflect evolutionary history as populations diverged and evolved independently. Clades are termed monophyletic (Greek: "one clan") groups. Over the last few decades, the cladistic approach has revolutionized biological classification and revealed surprising evolutionary relationships among organisms.[2] Increasingly, taxonomists try to avoid naming taxa that are not clades; that is, taxa that are not monophyletic
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Extinction
In biology and ecology, extinction is the termination of an organism or of a group of organisms (taxon), normally a species. The moment of extinction is generally considered to be the death of the last individual of the species, although the capacity to breed and recover may have been lost before this point. Because a species' potential range may be very large, determining this moment is difficult, and is usually done retrospectively
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
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