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DoubleClick
DoubleClick
DoubleClick
is a subsidiary of Google
Google
which develops and provides Internet ad serving services. Its clients include agencies, marketers and publishers who serve businesses like Microsoft, General Motors, Coca-Cola, Motorola, L'Oréal, Palm, Apple, Visa, Nike, and Carlsberg among others. DoubleClick
DoubleClick
was founded in 1996 by Kevin O'Connor and Dwight Merriman and have headquarters in New York City, United States. It was formerly listed as "DCLK" on the NASDAQ, and was purchased by private equity firms Hellman & Friedman and JMI Equity
JMI Equity
in July 2005
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Linux
Linux
Linux
(/ˈlɪnəks/ ( listen) LIN-əks)[9][10] is a family of free and open-source software operating systems built around the Linux
Linux
kernel. Typically, Linux
Linux
is packaged in a form known as a Linux distribution (or distro for short) for both desktop and server use. The defining component of a Linux distribution
Linux distribution
is the Linux kernel,[11] an operating system kernel first released on September 17, 1991, by Linus Torvalds.[12][13][14] Many Linux
Linux
distributions use the word "Linux" in their name
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Personally Identifiable Information
Personal information, described in United States legal fields as either personally identifiable information (PII), or sensitive personal information (SPI),[1][2][3] as used in information security and privacy laws, is information that can be used on its own or with other information to identify, contact, or locate a single person, or to identify an individual in context. The abbreviation PII is widely accepted in the U.S. context, but the phrase it abbreviates has four common variants based on personal / personally, and identifiable / identifying. Not all are equivalent, and for legal purposes the effective definitions vary depending on the jurisdiction and the purposes for which the term is being used
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NASDAQ
The Nasdaq Stock
Stock
Market (/ˈnæzˌdæk/ ( listen)) is an American stock exchange
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Private Equity
Private equity
Private equity
typically refers to investment funds organized as limited partnerships that are not publicly traded and whose investors are typically large institutional investors, university endowments, or wealthy individuals. Private equity
Private equity
firms are known for their extensive use of debt financing to purchase companies, which they restructure and attempt to resell for a higher value. Debt
Debt
financing reduces corporate taxation burdens and is one of the principal ways in which private equity firms make business more profitable for investors.[1] Private equity
Private equity
might also create value by overcoming agency costs and better aligning the incentives of corporate managers with those of their shareholders. P.E
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Drive-by Download
Drive-by download means two things, each concerning the unintended download of computer software from the Internet:Downloads which a person has authorized but without understanding the consequences (e.g. downloads which install an unknown or counterfeit executable program, ActiveX
ActiveX
component, or Java applet) automatically. Any download that happens without a person's knowledge, often a computer virus, spyware, malware, or crimeware.[1]Drive-by downloads may happen when visiting a website, viewing an e-mail message or by clicking on a deceptive pop-up window:[2] by clicking on the window in the mistaken belief that, for example, an error report from the computer's operating system itself is being acknowledged or a seemingly innocuous advertisement pop-up is being dismissed
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Malware
Malware, short for malicious software, is an umbrella term used to refer to a variety of forms of hostile or intrusive software,[1] including computer viruses, worms, Trojan horses, ransomware, spyware, adware, scareware, and other intentionally harmful programs. It can take the form of executable code, scripts, active content, and other software.[2] Malware
Malware
is defined by its malicious intent, acting against the requirements of the computer user — and so does not include software that causes unintentional harm due to some deficiency. Programs supplied officially by companies can be considered malware if they secretly act against the interests of the computer user
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Billion
A billion is a number with two distinct definitions:1,000,000,000, i.e. one thousand million, or 109 (ten to the ninth power), as defined on the short scale. This is now generally the meaning in both British and American English.[1][2] 1,000,000,000,000, i.e. one million million, or 1012 (ten to the twelfth power), as defined on the long scale. This is one thousand times larger than the short scale billion, and equivalent to the short scale trillion.American English always uses the short scale definition but British English has employed both versions. Historically, the United Kingdom used the long scale billion but since 1974 official UK statistics have used the short scale. Since the 1950s the short scale has been increasingly used in technical writing and journalism, although the long scale definition still enjoys common usage.[3] Other countries use the word billion (or words cognate to it) to denote either the long scale or short scale billion
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Application Service Provider
An application service provider (ASP) is a business providing computer-based services to customers over a network; such as access to a particular software application (such as customer relationship management) using a standard protocol (such as HTTP). The need for ASPs has evolved from the increasing costs of specialized software that have far exceeded the price range of small to medium-sized businesses. As well, the growing complexities of software have led to huge costs in distributing the software to end-users. Through ASPs, the complexities and costs of such software can be cut down. In addition, the issues of upgrading have been eliminated from the end-firm by placing the onus on the ASP to maintain up-to-date services, 24 x 7 technical support, physical and electronic security and in-built support for business continuity and flexible working. The importance of this marketplace is reflected by its size
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Page View
A page view, or more commonly now pageview, abbreviated in business to PV and occasionally called page impression, is a request to load a single HTML
HTML
file (web page) of an Internet site.[1] On the World Wide Web, a page request would result from a web surfer clicking on a link on another "page" pointing to the page in question. A hit, which refers to a request for any file from a web server. There may, therefore, be many hits per page view since an HTML
HTML
page can contain multiple files—images, CSS, etc.[2] On balance, page views refer to a number of pages viewed or clicked on the site during the given time.[3] Page views may be counted as part of web analytics. For the owner of the site, this information can be useful to see if any change in the "page" (such as the information or the way it is presented) results in more visits
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Abacus
The abacus (plural abaci or abacuses), also called a counting frame, is a calculating tool that was in use in Europe, China
China
and Russia, centuries before the adoption of the written Hindu–Arabic numeral system.[1] The exact origin of the abacus is still unknown. Today, abaci are often constructed as a bamboo frame with beads sliding on wires, but originally they were beans or stones moved in grooves in sand or on tablets of wood, stone, or metal. Abaci come in different designs. Some designs, like the bead frame consisting of beads divided into tens, are used mainly to teach arithmetic, although they remain popular in the post-Soviet states as a tool. Other designs, such as the Japanese soroban, have been used for practical calculations even involving several digits
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Exploit (computer Security)
An exploit (from the English verb to exploit, meaning "to use something to one’s own advantage") is a piece of software, a chunk of data, or a sequence of commands that takes advantage of a bug or vulnerability to cause unintended or unanticipated behavior to occur on computer software, hardware, or something electronic (usually computerized). Such behavior frequently includes things like gaining control of a computer system, allowing privilege escalation, or a denial-of-service (DoS or related DDoS) attack.Contents1 Classification1.1 Types 1.2 Pivoting2 See also 3 Notes 4 ReferencesClassification[edit] There are several methods of classifying exploits. The most common is by how the exploit communicates to the vulnerable software
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Antitrust
Competition
Competition
law is a law that promotes or seeks to maintain market competition by regulating anti-competitive conduct by companies.[1][2] Competition
Competition
law is implemented through public and private enforcement.[3] Competition
Competition
law is known as anti-trust law in the United States, and as anti-monopoly law in China[1] and Russia. In previous years it has been known as trade practices law in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and Australia. In the European Union, it is referred to as both antitrust[4] and competition law.[5][6] The history of competition law reaches back to the Roman Empire. The business practices of market traders, guilds and governments have always been subject to scrutiny, and sometimes severe sanctions
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Monopoly
A monopoly (from Greek μόνος mónos ["alone" or "single"] and πωλεῖν pōleîn ["to sell"]) exists when a specific person or enterprise is the only supplier of a particular commodity. This contrasts with a monopsony which relates to a single entity's control of a market to purchase a good or service, and with oligopoly which consists of a few sellers dominating a market.[2] Monopolies are thus characterized by a lack of economic competition to produce the good or service, a lack of viable substitute goods, and the possibility of a high monopoly price well above the seller's marginal cost that leads to a high monopoly profit.[3] The verb monopolise or monopolize refers to the process by which a company gains the ability to raise prices or exclude competitors. In economics, a monopoly is a single seller
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Federal Trade Commission
The Federal Trade Commission
Federal Trade Commission
(FTC) is an independent agency of the United States
United States
government, established in 1914 by the Federal Trade Commission Act. Its principal mission is the promotion of consumer protection and the elimination and prevention of anticompetitive business practices, such as coercive monopoly. The Federal Trade Commission Act
Federal Trade Commission Act
was one of President Woodrow Wilson's major acts against trusts. Trusts and trust-busting were significant political concerns during the Progressive Era. Since its inception, the FTC has enforced the provisions of the Clayton Act, a key antitrust statute, as well as the provisions of the FTC Act, 15 U.S.C. § 41 et seq
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European Union
The European Union
European Union
(EU) is a political and economic union of 28 member states that are located primarily in Europe. It has an area of 4,475,757 km2 (1,728,099 sq mi), and an estimated population of over 510 million. The EU has developed an internal single market through a standardised system of laws that apply in all member states
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