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Dir (clan)

According to many documented sources and historians, the patriarch Samaale arrived in northern Somalia from Yemen during the 9th century and subsequently founded the eponymous Samaale clan.[5] The Dir clan and the Hawiye trace descent from Irir the son of Samaale, who in turn traces his geneological traditions to Arabian Quraysh Banu Hashim origins through Aqiil the son of Abu Talib ibn Abd al-Muttalib, who was cousin of the Prophet Muhammed.[6][7][8][9][10][11][12]
The history of Islam being practiced by the Dir clan goes back 1400 years
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Proto-Somali
Proto-Somalis were the ancient people and ancestors of Somalis who lived in present-day Somalia.[1] Literature on proto-Somalis largely uses a time-frame pertaining to the 1st millennium BC and 1st millennium AD.[2] The Puntites were ancient Somalis who are believed to traded myrrh, spices, gold, ebony, short-horned cattle, ivory and frankincense with the Ancient Egyptians and ancient Mesopotamia through their commercial ports. An Ancient Egyptian expedition sent to Punt by the 18th dynasty Queen Hatshepsut is recorded on the temple reliefs at Deir el-Bahari, during the reign of the Puntite King Parahu and Queen Ati.[3] In the classical era, the Macrobians, who have been ancestral to the Automoli or ancient Somalis, established a powerful tribal kingdom that ruled large parts of modern Somalia
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Sultanate Of The Geledi
The Sultanate of the Geledi (Somali: Saldanadda Geledi, Arabic: سلطنة غلدي‎) also known as the Gobroon Dynasty[1] was a Somali kingdom that ruled parts of the Horn of Africa during the late-17th century and 19th century. The Sultanate was governed by the Gobroon Dynasty. It was established by the Geledi soldier Ibrahim Adeer, who had defeated various vassals of the Ajuran Sultanate and founded the House of Gobroon. The dynasty reached its apex under the successive reigns of Sultan Mahamud Ibrahim who built the Geledi army and successfully repelled the Oromo invasion and Sultan Yusuf Mahamud Ibrahim, who successfully modernized the Geledi economy and consolidated Geledi power during the Conquest of Bardera in 1843,[2] and Sultan Ahmed Yusuf, who forced regional powers such as the Omani Empire to submit tribute
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Ethiopian-Adal War
The Ethiopian–Adal War (Arabic: فتوح الحبشFutuḥ al-ḥabash) also known historically as the Conquest of Abyssinia was a military conflict between the Ethiopian Empire and the Adal Sultanate that took place from 1529 until 1543. Abyssinian troops consisted of Amhara people, Tigrayans, and Agaw people. Adal forces consisted mostly of Somalis,[5] supplemented with Afar, Harari, and Argobba forces.[6] Islam was introduced to the Horn of Africa early on from the Arabian peninsula, shortly after the hijra. In the late 9th century, Al-Yaqubi wrote that Muslims were living along the northern Somalia seaboard.[7] He also mentioned that the Adal kingdom had its capital in the city,[7][8] suggesting that the Adal Sultanate with Zeila as its headquarters dates back to at least the 9th or 10th centuries. According to I.M
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Ahmad Ibn Ibrahim Al-Ghazi
Ahmad ibn Ibrahim al-Ghazi (Somali: Axmad Ibraahim al-Gaasi, Harari: አህመድ ኢብራሂም አል-ጋዚ, Arabic: أحمد بن إبراهيم الغازي‎ ;[3] c. 1506 – 21 February 1543)[4] was a Somali Imam and General of the Adal Sultanate who fought against the Abyssinian empire.[4] With the help of an army mainly composed of Somalis, the Harla people,[5] Afars, Hararis and a small number of Arabs[6] and Ottoman Turks,[7] Imam Ahmad (nicknamed Gurey in Somali, "Gura" in Afar and Gragn in Amharic (ግራኝ Graññ), all meaning "the left-handed"), embarked on a conquest which brought three-quarters of Abyssinia (modern day Ethiopia) under the power of the Muslim Sultanate of Adal during the Abyssinian-Adal War. [8] I. M
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Imam
Imam (/ɪˈmɑːm/; Arabic: إمامimām; plural: أئمة aʼimmah) is an Islamic leadership position. It is most commonly used as the title of a worship leader of a mosque and Muslim community among Sunni Muslims. In this context, imams may lead Islamic worship services, serve as community leaders, and provide religious guidance
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Jarso (Hararge)
Jarso is a woreda in the Oromia Region of Ethiopia. Part of the East Hararghe Zone, Jarso is bordered on the south by the Harari Region, on the west by Kombolcha, on the north by the city of Dire Dawa, on the east by the Somali Region, and on the southeast by Gursum. The administrative center of this woreda is Ejersa Goro. The altitude of this woreda ranges from 1050 to 3030 meters above sea level; Mount Gara Sirirta, Aybera, Kilisa and Bekekalu are amongst the highest peaks. Rivers include the Gideya. A survey of the land in Jarso (reported in 1995/96) shows that 19.3% is arable or cultivable, 1.7% pasture, 21.6% forest, and the remaining 57.4% is considered degraded or otherwise unusable
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Adal Sultanate

The Abyssinian–Adal war was a military conflict between the Ethiopian Empire (Abyssinia) and the Adal Sultanate that took place from 1529 until 1543. Abyssinian troops consisted of Amhara, Tigrayan and Agew ethnic groups. Adal forces consisted mostly of Afar, Somali, Harla, Argobba, and Arab formations, supported by the Ottomans.[54] In the mid-1520s, Imam Ahmad ibn Ibrahim al-Ghazi assumed control of Adal and launched a war against Abyssinia, which was then under the leadership of Dawit II (Lebna Dengel)
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Migration To Abyssinia
The Migration to Abyssinia (Arabic: الهجرة إلى الحبشة‎, al-hijra ʾilā al-habaša), also known as the First Hegira (Arabic: هِجْرَةhijrah), was an episode in the early history of Islam, where Muhammad's first followers (the Sahabah) fled from the persecution of the ruling Quraysh tribe of Mecca. They sought refuge in the Christian Kingdom of Aksum, present-day Ethiopia and Eritrea (formerly referred to as Abyssinia, an ancient name whose origin is debated),[1] in 9 BH (613 CE) or 7 BH (615 CE). The Aksumite monarch who received them is known in Islamic sources as the Negus (Arabic: نجاشيnajāšī) Ashama ibn Abjar
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Abu Talib Ibn Abd Al-Muttalib
Abu Talib ibn Abd al-Muttalib (Arabic: أَبُو طَالِب ٱبْن عَبْد ٱلْمُطَّلِبʾAbū Ṭālib ibn ʿAbd al-Muṭṭalib; c. 535 – c. 619) Abu Talib means; The father of Talib, born ʿImrān (عِمْرَان) or ʿAbd Manāf (عَبْد مَنَاف),[1] was the leader of Banu Hashim, a clan of the Qurayshi tribe of Mecca in the Hejazi region of the Arabian Peninsula. He was an uncle of the Islamic Prophet Muhammad,[2] and father of the Rashid Caliph Ali
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Aqeel Ibn Abi Talib

Aqeel ibn Abi Talib (Arabic: عَقِيل ٱبْن أَبِي طَالِب‎, ʿAqīl ibn ʾAbī Ṭālib) was a companion and first cousin of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. He was known by the kunyas Abu Aqeel[citation needed] and Abu Yazid.[1] He was born c. 581 CE, the second son of Abu Talib and Fatimah bint Asad; hence he was a brother of Ali. He was said to be an expert in genealogy.[2] He married Fatima bint Al-Walid from the Abdshams clan of the Quraysh.[3] He had seven sons: Muhammad, Muslim, Ja'far, Musa, Abdul Rahman, Abdullah and Abu Saeed; and a daughter, Ramla.[
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