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Carnuntum
Carnuntum
Carnuntum
(Καρνους, Carnous in Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
according to Ptolemy) was a Roman Legionary Fortress or castrum legionarium and also headquarters of the Pannonian fleet from 50 AD. After the 1st century it was capital of the Pannonia Superior
Pannonia Superior
province
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Canaba
A Canaba (Canabae plural)[1] was the Latin term for a hut or hovel and was later (from the time of Hadrian)[2] used typically to mean a collection of "huts" (Canabae legionis) that emerged as a civilian settlement in the vicinity of a Roman legionary fortress (castrum).[3] Where such a settlement grew up outside an auxiliary fort it was called a 'vicus' (village, plural vici), which is the term most widely used for this type of settlement, and because canabae were often divided into vici. Permanent forts attracted military dependants and civilian contractors who serviced the base who needed housing; traders, artisans, sellers of food and drink, prostitutes, and also unofficial wives of soldiers and their children and hence most forts had vici or canabae
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Italy
Coordinates: 43°N 12°E / 43°N 12°E / 43; 12Italian Republic Repubblica Italiana  (Italian)FlagEmblemAnthem: Il Canto degli Italiani  (Italian) "The Song of the Italians"Location of  Italy  (dark green) – in Europe  (light green & dark grey) – in the European Union  (light green)  –  [Legend]Capital and largest city Rome 41°54′N 12°29′E / 41.900°N 12.483°E / 41.900; 12.483Official languages ItalianaNative languages see full listReligion83.3% Christians 12.4% irreligious 3.7% Muslims 0.2% Buddhists 0.1% Hindus 0.3% other religions[1]Demonym ItalianGovernment Unitary constitutional parliamentary republic• PresidentSergio Mattarella• Prime MinisterPaolo Gentiloni• President of the SenateElisabetta Casellati•&
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Vespasian
Vespasian
Vespasian
(/vɛsˈpeɪʒiən, vɛsˈpeɪziən/; Latin: Titus
Titus
Flavius Vespasianus;[note 1] 17 November 9 – 24 June 79 AD)[1] was Roman emperor from AD 69 to AD 79, the fourth, and last, in the Year of the Four Emperors. He founded the Flavian dynasty
Flavian dynasty
that ruled the Empire for 27 years. Vespasian
Vespasian
was from an equestrian family that rose into the senatorial rank under the Julio–Claudian emperors
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Legio VII Gemina
Legio septima Gemina (properly Geminia: Latin for "The Twins' Seventh Legion") was a legion of the Imperial Roman army. It was founded in AD 68 in Spain by the general Galba
Galba
to take part in his rebellion against the emperor Nero. "Gemina" means the legion was dedicated to the legendary twin founders of Rome, Romulus
Romulus
and Remus, who were suckled by a she-wolf. The legion was deployed in the city called Legio (modern-day León, Spain) in AD 74 and remained in Hispania
Hispania
to the end of the 4th century.[1] Tacitus
Tacitus
calls the legion "Galbiana", to distinguish it from the senior Legio VII Claudia, but this appellation is not found on any inscriptions
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Galba
Galba
Galba
(English: /ˈsɜːrviəs sʌlˈpɪʃəs ˈɡælbə/;; Latin: Servius Sulpicius Galba
Galba
Caesar Augustus;[2] 24 December 3 BC – 15 January 69 AD) was Roman emperor
Roman emperor
for seven months from 68 to 69. The governor of Hispania Tarraconensis
Hispania Tarraconensis
at the time of the rebellion of Julius Vindex in Gaul, he seized the throne following Nero's suicide. Born into a wealthy family, Galba
Galba
was a capable military officer during the first half of the first century AD. He retired during Nero's reign but was later granted the governorship of Hispania Tarraconensis
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Municipium
Municipium (pl. municipia) was the Latin term for a town or city.[1] Etymologically the municipium was a social contract between municipes, the "duty holders," or citizens of the town. The duties, or munera, were a communal obligation assumed by the municipes in exchange for the privileges and protections of citizenship. Every citizen was a municeps.[2] The distinction of municipia was not made in the Roman kingdom; instead, the immediate neighbors of the city were invited or compelled to transfer their populations to the urban structure of Rome, where they took up residence in neighborhoods and became Romans per se. Under the Roman Republic
Roman Republic
the practical considerations of incorporating communities into the city-state of Rome
Rome
forced the Romans to devise the concept of municipium, a distinct state under the jurisdiction of Rome
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Parthia
Parthia
Parthia
(Old Persian: 𐎱𐎼𐎰𐎺, Parθava, Parthian: 𐭐𐭓𐭕𐭅, Parθaw, Middle Persian: 𐭯𐭫𐭮𐭥𐭡𐭥‎, Pahlaw) is a historical region located in north-eastern Iran. It was conquered and subjugated by the empire of the Medes
Medes
during the 7th century BC, was incorporated into the subsequent Achaemenid Empire
Achaemenid Empire
under Cyrus the Great
Cyrus the Great
in the 6th century BC, and formed part of the Hellenistic
Hellenistic
Seleucid Empire
Seleucid Empire
following the 4th-century-BC conquests of Alexander the Great. The region later served as the political and cultural base of the Eastern-Iranian Parni people and Arsacid dynasty, rulers of the Parthian Empire
Parthian Empire
(247 BC – 224 AD)
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Trajan's Dacian Wars
 Roman Empire IazygesCommanders and leadersDecebalus TrajanStrengthUnknown. Total manpower pool of some 250,000. 150,000 in the first war - 200,000 in the second warCasualties and lossesUnknown Unknownv t eDomitian's and Trajan's Dacian WarsDomitian's Dacian War Second Battle of Tapae Adamclisi SarmisegetusaThe Dacian Wars (101–102, 105–106) were two military campaigns fought between the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
and Dacia
Dacia
( in modern days Transylvania or Romania) during Roman Emperor Trajan's rule
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Marcus Aurelius
Marcus Aurelius
Marcus Aurelius
(/ɔːˈriːliəs/; Latin: Marcus Aurelius
Marcus Aurelius
Antoninus Augustus;[6][notes 1][9] 26 April 121 – 17 March 180 AD) was Roman emperor from 161 to 180, ruling jointly with his adoptive brother (and son-in-law), Lucius Verus, until Verus' death in 169 and jointly with his son, Commodus, from 177. He was the last of the so-called Five Good Emperors. He was a practitioner of Stoicism, and his untitled writing, commonly known as Meditations, is a significant source of the modern understanding of ancient Stoic philosophy. It is considered by many commentators to be one of the greatest works of philosophy.[10] During his reign, the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
defeated a revitalized Parthian Empire in the East: Aurelius' general Avidius Cassius sacked the capital Ctesiphon
Ctesiphon
in 164
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Lower Austria
Lower Austria
Austria
(German: Niederösterreich, pronounced [ˈniːdɐˌʔøːstɐʀaɪ̯ç] ( listen); Czech: Dolní Rakousy; Slovak: Dolné Rakúsko) is the northeasternmost state of the nine states in Austria. The capital of Lower Austria
Austria
since 1986 is Sankt Pölten, the most recently designated capital town in Austria. The capital of Lower Austria
Austria
had formerly been Vienna, even though Vienna
Vienna
has not officially been part of Lower Austria
Austria
since 1921
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Quadi
The Quadi
Quadi
were a Suebian
Suebian
Germanic tribe who lived approximately in the area of modern Moravia
Moravia
in the time of the Roman Empire. The only known information about the Germanic tribe the Romans called the 'Quadi' comes through reports of the Romans themselves, whose empire had its border on the River Danube
Danube
just to the south of the Quadi. They associated the Quadi
Quadi
with their neighbours the Marcomanni, and described both groups as having entered the region after the Celtic Boii
Boii
had left it deserted
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Germania
Germania
Germania
(/dʒərˈmeɪniə/; Latin: [ɡɛrˈmaː.ni.a]) was the Roman term for the geographical region in north-central Europe inhabited mainly by Germanic peoples. It extended from the Danube
Danube
in the south to the Baltic Sea, and from the Rhine
Rhine
in the west to the Vistula. The Roman portions formed two provinces of the Empire, Germania Inferior
Germania Inferior
to the north (present-day Netherlands, Belgium, and western Germany), and Germania Superior
Germania Superior
to the south (Switzerland, southwestern Germany, and eastern France). Germania
Germania
was inhabited mostly by Germanic tribes, but also Celts, Balts, Scythians
Scythians
and later on Early Slavs. The population mix changed over time by assimilation, and especially by migration
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Tacitus
Publius (or Gaius) Cornelius Tacitus
Tacitus
(/ˈtæsɪtəs/; Classical Latin: [ˈtakɪtʊs]; c. 56 – c. 120 AD) was a senator and a historian of the Roman Empire. The surviving portions of his two major works—the Annals and the Histories—examine the reigns of the Roman emperors Tiberius, Claudius, Nero, and those who reigned in the Year of the Four Emperors
Year of the Four Emperors
(69 AD). These two works span the history of the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
from the death of Augustus, in 14 AD, to the years of the First Jewish–Roman War, in 70 AD
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Szőny
Szőny
Szőny
was a town in Hungary. Since 1977, it has been part of the city of Komárom. History[edit] The Roman legion Legio I Adiutrix
Legio I Adiutrix
was based here from 86 AD to the mid-5th century and took part in several Parthian wars.[2] The town was known as Brigetio to the Romans, and was the site of the death of Roman Emperor Valentinian I[3] An important Roman military diploma was found in the town in the early twentieth century - it is now in the British Museum's collection.[4] Later during the Middle Ages the town was called Camarum
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Brigetio
Szőny
Szőny
was a town in Hungary. Since 1977, it has been part of the city of Komárom. History[edit] The Roman legion Legio I Adiutrix
Legio I Adiutrix
was based here from 86 AD to the mid-5th century and took part in several Parthian wars.[2] The town was known as Brigetio to the Romans, and was the site of the death of Roman Emperor Valentinian I[3] An important Roman military diploma was found in the town in the early twentieth century - it is now in the British Museum's collection.[4] Later during the Middle Ages the town was called Camarum
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