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Bubastis
Bubastis
Bubastis
(Bohairic Coptic: Ⲡⲟⲩⲃⲁⲥϯ Poubasti; Greek: Βούβαστις Boubastis[1] or Βούβαστος Boubastos[2]), also known in Arabic as Tell-Basta or in Egyptian as Per-Bast, was an Ancient Egyptian city. It was the capital of its own nome, located along the River Nile
Nile
in the Delta region of Lower Egypt. Its ruins are located in the suburbs of the modern city of Zagazig. Bubastis
Bubastis
is often identified with the biblical Pi-Beseth (Hebrew פי-בסת py-bst, Ezekiel 30:17).[3]Contents1 Etymology 2 History 3 Religion 4 Christian bishopric 5 Excavations 6 References 7 External linksEtymology[edit] The name of Bubastis
Bubastis
in Egyptian is Pr-Bȝśt.t, typically transcribed Per-Bast. PR means "house" and the second word is the name of the goddess Bast or Bastet
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Watchmen
Watchmen
Watchmen
is an American comic book
American comic book
limited series by the British creative team of writer Alan Moore, artist Dave Gibbons
Dave Gibbons
and colorist John Higgins. It was published by DC Comics
DC Comics
in 1986 and 1987, and collected in a single volume edition in 1987. Watchmen
Watchmen
originated from a story proposal Moore submitted to DC featuring superhero characters that the company had acquired from Charlton Comics. As Moore's proposed story would have left many of the characters unusable for future stories, managing editor Dick Giordano
Dick Giordano
convinced Moore to create original characters instead. Moore used the story as a means to reflect contemporary anxieties and to deconstruct and parody the superhero concept
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Twenty-sixth Dynasty Of Egypt
The Twenty-sixth Dynasty of Egypt
Twenty-sixth Dynasty of Egypt
(notated Dynasty XXVI, alternatively 26th Dynasty or Dynasty 26) was the last native dynasty to rule Egypt before the Persian conquest in 525 BC (although others followed). The dynasty's reign (664–525 BC) is also called the Saite Period after the city of Sais, where its pharaohs had their capital, and marks the beginning of the Late Period of ancient Egypt.[1]Contents1 History 2 Art 3 Pharaohs of the 26th Dynasty 4 Timeline of the 26th Dynasty 5 See also 6 References 7 BibliographyHistory[edit] This dynasty traced its origins to the 24th Dynasty. Psamtik I
Psamtik I
was probably a descendant of Bakenrenef, and following the Assyrians' invasions during the reigns of Taharqa
Taharqa
and Tantamani, he was recognized as sole king over all of Egypt
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Sethos I
Menmaatre Seti I (or Sethos I as in Greek) was a pharaoh of the New Kingdom Nineteenth Dynasty of Egypt, the son of Ramesses I and Sitre, and the father of Ramesses II. As with all dates in Ancient Egypt, the actual dates of his reign are unclear, and various historians claim different dates, with 1294 BC to 1279 BC[4] and 1290 BC to 1279 BC[5] being the most commonly used by scholars today. The name 'Seti' means "of Set", which indicates that he was consecrated to the god Set (also termed "Sutekh" or "Seth"). As with most pharaohs, Seti had several names
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Amenophis II
Amenhotep II (sometimes called Amenophis II and meaning Amun is Satisfied) was the seventh Pharaoh of the 18th dynasty of Egypt. Amenhotep inherited a vast kingdom from his father Thutmose III, and held it by means of a few military campaigns in Syria; however, he fought much less than his father, and his reign saw the effective cessation of hostilities between Egypt and Mitanni, the major kingdoms vying for power in Syria. His reign is usually dated from 1427 to 1401 BC.Contents1 Family and early life 2 Dates and length of reign 3 Foreign affairs 4 Construction projects4.1 Tomb5 Personality and later life 6 See also 7 Footnotes 8 References 9 External linksFamily and early life[edit]Foundation tablet. It shows the cartouche of the birth name and epithet "Amenhotep, the god, the Ruler of Thebes". 18th Dynasty. From Kurna, Egypt. The Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, LondonFoundation tablet showing the prenomen cartouche of the throne-name of Amenhotep II
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Pharaoh
Pharaoh
Pharaoh
(/ˈfeɪ.roʊ/, /fɛr.oʊ/[1][2] or /fær.oʊ/;[2] Coptic: ⲡⲣ̅ⲣⲟ Prro) is the common title of the monarchs of ancient Egypt from the First Dynasty (c. 3150 BCE) until the annexation of Egypt by the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in 30 BCE,[3] although the actual term "Pharaoh" was not used contemporaneously for a ruler until circa 1200 BCE. In the early dynasty, ancient Egyptian kings used to have up to three titles, the Horus, the Nesu Bety, and the Nebty name. The Golden Horus
Horus
and Nomen and prenomen titles were later added. In Egyptian society, religion was central to everyday life. One of the roles of the pharaoh was as an intermediary between the gods and the people. The pharaoh thus deputised for the gods; his role was both as civil and religious administrator
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Twenty-third Dynasty Of Egypt
The Twenty-third Dynasty of Egypt
Twenty-third Dynasty of Egypt
(notated Dynasty XXIII, alternatively 23rd Dynasty or Dynasty 23) is usually classified as the third dynasty of the ancient Egyptian Third Intermediate Period. This dynasty consisted of a number of Meshwesh
Meshwesh
ancient Libyan (Berber) kings, who ruled either as pharaohs or independent kings of parts of Upper Egypt
Upper Egypt
from 880 BC to 720 BC, and pharaohs from 837 BC to 728 BC. History[edit] There is much debate surrounding this dynasty, which may have been situated at Herakleopolis
Herakleopolis
Magna, Hermopolis Magna, and Thebes. Monuments from their reign show that they controlled Upper Egypt
Upper Egypt
in parallel with the Twenty-second dynasty, shortly before the death of Osorkon II.Dynasties of Ancient EgyptAll years are BCEarlyFirst Dynasty I c
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Persian Empire
The Persian Empire
Empire
(Persian: شاهنشاهی ایران‎, translit. Šâhanšâhiye Irân, lit. 'Imperial Iran') is a series of imperial dynasties centered in Persia/ Iran
Iran
since the 6th century BC in the Achaemenid
Achaemenid
era, to the 20th century AD in the Qajar
Qajar
era.Contents1 Achaemenids 2 Parthians and Sasanians 3 Safavids 4 List of the dynasties described as a Persian Empire 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksAchaemenids The first dynasty of the Persian Empire
Empire
was created by Achaemenids, established by Cyrus the Great
Cyrus the Great
in 550 BC with the conquest of Median, Lydian and Babylonian empires.[1] It covered much of the Ancient world and controlled the largest percentage of the earth's population in history when it was conquered by Alexander the Great
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Cambyses II
Cambyses II
Cambyses II
(Old Persian: 𐎣𐎲𐎢𐎪𐎡𐎹 Kambūjiya[5][6] Aramaic: כנבוזי‎ Kanbūzī;[7] Ancient Greek: Καμβύσης Kambúsēs; Latin Cambyses; Medieval Hebrew כמבישה‬, Kambisha)[8][9] (d. 522 BC) son of Cyrus the Great
Cyrus the Great
(r. 559–530 BC), was emperor of the Achaemenid Empire. Cambyses' grandfather was Cambyses I, king of Anshan. Following Cyrus the Great's conquest of the Near East
Near East
and Central Asia, Cambyses II further expanded the empire into Egypt during the Late Period by defeating the Egyptian Pharaoh
Pharaoh
Psamtik III
Psamtik III
during the battle of Pelusium
Pelusium
in 525 BC
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Achaemenid Dynasty
The Achaemenid Empire
Empire
(/əˈkiːmənɪd/ c. 550–330 BC), also called the First Persian Empire,[11] was an empire based in Western Asia, founded by Cyrus the Great. Ranging at its greatest extent from the Balkans
Balkans
and Eastern Europe
Eastern Europe
proper in the west to the Indus Valley in the east, it was larger than any previous empire in history, spanning 5.5 million square kilometers. Incorporating various peoples of different origins and faiths, it is notable for its successful model of a centralised, bureaucratic administration (through satraps under the King of Kings), for building infrastructure such as road systems and a postal system, the use of an official language across its territories, and the development of civil services and a large professional army
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Ancient Greeks
Ancient Greece
Greece
was a civilization belonging to a period of Greek history from the Greek Dark Ages
Greek Dark Ages
of the 13th–9th centuries BC to the end of antiquity (c. 600 AD). Immediately following this period was the beginning of the Early Middle Ages
Middle Ages
and the Byzantine
Byzantine
era.[1] Roughly three centuries after the Late Bronze Age collapse
Late Bronze Age collapse
of Mycenaean Greece, Greek urban poleis began to form in the 8th century BC, ushering in the period of Archaic Greece
Archaic Greece
and colonization of the Mediterranean Basin. This was followed by the period of Classical Greece, an era that began with the Greco-Persian Wars, lasting from the 5th to 4th centuries BC
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Eusebius
Eusebius
Eusebius
of Caesarea (/juːˈsiːbiəs/; Greek: Εὐσέβιος τῆς Καισαρείας, Eusébios tés Kaisareías; AD 260/265 – 339/340), also known as Eusebius
Eusebius
Pamphili (from the Greek: Εὐσέβιος τοῦ Παμϕίλου), was a historian of Christianity, exegete, and Christian polemicist. He became the bishop of Caesarea Maritima
Caesarea Maritima
about 314 AD. Together with Pamphilus, he was a scholar of the Biblical canon
Biblical canon
and is regarded as an extremely learned Christian of his time.[1] He wrote Demonstrations of the Gospel, Preparations for the Gospel, and On Discrepancies between the Gospels, studies of the Biblical text
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Psamtik I
Wahibre Psamtik I, known by the Greeks as Psammeticus or Psammetichus (Latinization of Ancient Greek: Ψαμμήτιχος, translit. Psammḗtikhos), who ruled 664–610 BC, was the first of three kings of that name of the Saite, or Twenty-sixth Dynasty of Egypt. Historical references for what the Greeks referred to as the Dodecarchy, a loose confederation of twelve Egyptian territories, based on the traditional nomes, and the rise of Psamtik I in power, establishing the Saitic Dynasty, are recorded in Herodotus's Histories, Book II: 151–157
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Ionians
The Ionians
Ionians
(/aɪˈoʊniənz/; Greek: Ἴωνες, Íōnes, singular Ἴων, Íōn) were one of the four major tribes that the Greeks considered themselves to be divided into during the ancient period; the other three being the Dorians, Aeolians, and Achaeans.[1] The Ionian dialect was one of the three major linguistic divisions of the Hellenic world, together with the Dorian and Aeolian dialects. When referring to populations, “Ionian” defines several groups in Classical Greece. In the narrowest sense it referred to the region of Ionia
Ionia
in Asia Minor. In a broader sense it could be used to describe all speakers of the Ionic dialect, which in addition to those in Ionia proper also included the populations of Euboea, the Cyclades, and many cities founded by Ionian colonists
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Carian
The Carian language is an extinct language of the Luwian
Luwian
subgroup of the Anatolian branch of the Indo-European language
Indo-European language
family. The Carian language was spoken in Caria, a region of western Anatolia
Anatolia
between the ancient regions of Lycia
Lycia
and Lydia, by the Carians, a name possibly first mentioned in Hittite sources. Prior to the late 20th century CE the language remained a total mystery even though many characters of the script appeared to be from the Greek alphabet. Using Greek phonetic values of letters investigators of the 19th and 20th centuries were unable to make headway and classified the language as non-Indo-European
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Necho II
Necho II[1] (sometimes Nekau,[2] Neku,[3] Nechoh,[4] or Nikuu;[5] Greek: Νεχώς Β' or Νεχώ Β';[6][7][citation needed] Hebrew: נְכוֹ‬, Modern Nəkō, Tiberian Nekō) of Egypt was a king of the 26th Dynasty
26th Dynasty
(610–595 BC). Necho undertook a number of construction projects across his kingdom.[8] In his reign, according to the Greek historian Herodotus
Herodotus
(4.42), Necho II
Necho II
sent out an expedition[9] of Phoenicians, which in three years sailed from the Red Sea around Africa
Africa
to the mouth of the Nile. His son, Psammetichus II, upon succession may have removed Necho's name from monuments.[10] Necho played a significant role in the histories of the Neo-Assyrian Empire, the Neo-Babylonian Empire
Neo-Babylonian Empire
and the Kingdom of Judah
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