HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Benjamin
Bela (son) Beker (son) Ashbel (son) Gera (son) Naaman (son) Ehi (son) Rosh (son) Muppim (son) Huppim (son) Ard (son) [1]Parents Jacob
Jacob
(father) Rachel
Rachel
(mother)RelativesReuben (half brother) Simeon (half brother) Levi
Levi
(half brother) Judah (half brother) Issachar (half brother) Zebulun (half brother) Dan (half brother) Naphtali (half brother) Gad (half brother) Asher
Asher
(half brother) Joseph
Joseph
(brother) Dinah
Dinah
(half sister) Benjamin
Benjamin
(Hebrew: בנימין, "Son of the right side") was the last-born of Jacob's thirteen children (12 sons and 1 daughter), and the second and last son of Rachel
Rachel
in Jewish, Christian
Christian
and Islamic tradition
[...More...]

"Benjamin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Matriarch
Matriarchy
Matriarchy
is a social system in which females (most notably in mammals) hold the primary power positions in roles of political leadership, moral authority, social privilege and control of property at the specific exclusion of males - at least to a large degree. While those definitions apply in general English, definitions specific to the disciplines of anthropology and feminism differ in some respects. Most anthropologists hold that there are no known anthropological societies that are unambiguously matriarchal, but some authors believe exceptions may exist or may have. Matriarchies may also be confused with matrilineal, matrilocal, and matrifocal societies
[...More...]

"Matriarch" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sefer HaYashar (midrash)
—— Tannaitic ——Mishnah Tosefta—— Amoraic (Gemara) —— Jerusalem
Jerusalem
Talmud Babylonian Talmud—— Later ——Minor TractatesHalakhic Midrash—— Exodus ——Mekhilta of Rabbi Ishmael Mekhilta of Rabbi Shimon
[...More...]

"Sefer HaYashar (midrash)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hebrew Bible
Outline of Bible-related topics   Bible
Bible
book    Bible
Bible
portalv t ePage from an 11th-century Aramaic Targum
Targum
manuscript of the Hebrew Bible.Hebrew Bible
Bible
or Hebrew Scriptures (Latin: Biblia Hebraica) is the term used by biblical scholars to refer to the Tanakh
Tanakh
(Hebrew: תנ"ך‎; Latin: Thanach), the canonical collection of Jewish texts. They are composed mainly in Biblical Hebrew, with some passages in Biblical Aramaic (in the books of Daniel, Ezra and a few others). The Hebrew Bible
Bible
is the common textual source of several canonical editions of the Christian
Christian
Old Testament
[...More...]

"Hebrew Bible" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Jahwist
The Jahwist, or Yahwist, often abbreviated J, is one of the hypothesized sources of the Pentateuch (Torah), together with the Deuteronomist, the Elohist and the Priestly source. According to the basic four-source hypothesis first proposed by Julius Wellhausen, the J Source is the oldest strand of the Pentateuch, dating back to the 9th or 10th century BCE; this dating has more recently fallen out of favor.[1][2][3] It originally received its name from its characteristic use of the term Yahweh
Yahweh
(German Jahwe, Hebrew יהוה) for God.[4] During most of the 20th century the dominant belief among scholars was that the Torah
Torah
had been composed by intertwining four originally separate and complete documents, of which the Jahwist was one—this was called the documentary hypothesis
[...More...]

"Jahwist" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Etymology
Etymology
Etymology
(/ˌɛtɪˈmɒlədʒi/)[1] is the study of the history of words, their origins, and how their form and meaning have changed over time.[1] By extension, the term "the etymology (of a word)" means the origin of the particular word. For a language such as Greek with a long written history, etymologists make use of texts in these languages and texts about the languages to gather knowledge about how words were used during earlier periods of their history and when they entered the languages in question. Etymologists also apply the methods of comparative linguistics to reconstruct information about languages that are too old for any direct information to be available. By analyzing related languages with a technique known as the comparative method, linguists can make inferences about their shared parent language and its vocabulary
[...More...]

"Etymology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Rashi
Shlomo Yitzchaki (Hebrew: רבי שלמה יצחקי‬‎; Latin: Salomon Isaacides; French: Salomon de Troyes, 22 February 1040 – 13 July 1105), today generally known by the acronym Rashi
Rashi
(Hebrew: רש"י‬, RAbbi SHlomo Itzhaki), was a medieval French rabbi and author of a comprehensive commentary on the Talmud
Talmud
and commentary on the Tanakh. Acclaimed for his ability to present the basic meaning of the text in a concise and lucid fashion, Rashi
Rashi
appeals to both learned scholars and beginner students, and his works remain a centerpiece of contemporary Jewish study
[...More...]

"Rashi" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Aram-Naharaim
Aram-Naharaim (Aramaic: ארם נהריים) is a region that is mentioned five times in the Hebrew Bible or Old Testament. It is commonly identified with Nahrima mentioned in three tablets of the Amarna
Amarna
correspondence as a geographical description of the kingdom of Mitanni. In Genesis, it is used somewhat interchangeably with the names Paddan Aram and Haran to denote the place where Abraham
Abraham
stayed briefly with his father Terah's family after leaving Ur of the Chaldees, while en route to Canaan
Canaan
(Gen. 11:31), and the place from which later patriarchs obtained wives, rather than marry daughters of Canaan. Paddan Aram refers to the part of Aram-Naharaim along the upper Euphrates, while Haran is mainly identified with the ancient Assyrian city of Harran
Harran
on the Balikh River
[...More...]

"Aram-Naharaim" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Mem
Mem (also spelled Meem, Meme, or Mim) is the thirteenth letter of the Semitic abjads, including Phoenician Mēm , Hebrew Mēm מ, Aramaic Mem , Syriac Mīm ܡܡ, and Arabic
Arabic
Mīm م
[...More...]

"Mem" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fasted
Fasting
Fasting
is the willing abstinence or reduction from some or all food, drink, or both, for a period of time. An absolute fast or dry fasting is normally defined as abstinence from all food and liquid for a defined period, usually 24 hours, or a number of days. Water fasting allows the drinking of water, but nothing else, although black coffee and tea may be consumed. Other fasts may be partially restrictive, limiting only particular foods or substances, or be intermittent. In a physiological context, fasting may refer to the metabolic status of a person who has not eaten overnight, or to the metabolic state achieved after complete digestion and absorption of a meal. Several metabolic adjustments occur during fasting. Some diagnostic tests are used to determine a fasting state
[...More...]

"Fasted" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Astrology
Expand list for reference▼ Astrology► Astrology
Astrology
images► Astrology
Astrology
stubs► Astrologers► Astrological ages► Astrological data collectors► Astrological organizations► Astrological signs► History of astrology►
[...More...]

"Astrology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Astrolabe
An astrolabe (Greek: ἀστρολάβος astrolabos; Arabic: ٱلأَسْطُرلاب‎ al-Asturlāb) is an elaborate inclinometer, historically used by astronomers and navigators to measure the inclined position in the sky of a celestial body, day or night. The word astrolabe means "the one that catches the heavenly bodies."[1] It can thus be used to identify stars or planets, to determine local latitude given local time (and vice versa), to survey, or to triangulate. It was used in classical antiquity, the Islamic Golden Age,[2] the European Middle Ages, and the Renaissance
Renaissance
for all these purposes. The astrolabe's importance not only comes from the early development of astronomy,[1] but is also effective for determining latitude on land or calm seas
[...More...]

"Astrolabe" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Divination
Divination
Divination
(from Latin divinare "to foresee, to be inspired by a god",[2] related to divinus, divine) is the attempt to gain insight into a question or situation by way of an occultic, standardized process or ritual.[3] Used in various forms throughout history, diviners ascertain their interpretations of how a querent should proceed by reading signs, events, or omens, or through alleged contact with a supernatural agency.[4] Divination
Divination
can be seen as a systematic method with which to organize what appear to be disjointed, random facets of existence such that they provide insight into a problem at hand. If a distinction is to be made between divination and fortune-telling, divination has a more formal or ritualistic element and often contains a more social character, usually in a religious context, as seen in traditional African medicine
[...More...]

"Divination" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Morgan Bible
The Morgan Bible
Bible
(The Pierpont Morgan Library, New York, Ms M. 638), also called the Crusader Bible
Bible
or Maciejowski Bible, is a medieval picture Bible
Bible
of 46 folios. The book consists of paintings of events from Hebrew
Hebrew
scripture, set in the scenery and customs of thirteenth-century France, depicted from a Christian
Christian
perspective. Scenes are surrounded by text in three scripts and five languages: Latin, Persian, Arabic, Judeo-Persian, and Hebrew. Forty three folios are kept in the Pierpont Morgan Library. Two folios are kept in the Bibliothèque nationale de France. A single folio is kept in the J
[...More...]

"Morgan Bible" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mamluk
Mamluk
Mamluk
(Arabic: مملوك mamlūk (singular), مماليك mamālīk (plural), meaning "property", also transliterated as mamlouk, mamluq, mamluke, mameluk, mameluke, mamaluke or marmeluke) is an Arabic designation for slaves
[...More...]

"Mamluk" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.