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Baise Uprising
The Baise Uprising (simplified Chinese: 百色起义; traditional Chinese: 百色起義; pinyin: Bǎisè Qǐyì), also known as the Youjiang Riots (simplified Chinese: 右江暴动; traditional Chinese: 右江暴動; pinyin: Yòujiāng Bàodòng), was a successful military insurrection in late 1929 in Baise, Guangxi, China, instigated by the Communist Party of China using tense relations between warlords Yu Zuobai and Li Mingrui of the New Guangxi clique, that aimed at opposing Chiang Kai-shek and the Kuomintang party and seizing power by force
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Simplified Chinese Characters
Simplified Chinese characters (简化字; jiǎnhuàzì)[1] are standardized Chinese characters used in mainland China, as prescribed by Table of General Standard Chinese Characters. Along with traditional Chinese characters, they are one of the two standard character sets of the contemporary Chinese written language. The government of the People's Republic of China in mainland China has promoted them for use in printing since the 1950s and 1960s to encourage literacy.[2] They are officially used in the People's Republic of China and Singapore, while traditional Chinese characters are used in Hong Kong, Macau, the Republic of China (Taiwan) and occasionally in the Chinese community of Malaysia and Singapore. Simplified Chinese characters may be referred to by their official name above or colloquially (简体字; jiǎntǐzì)
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Traditional Chinese Characters

Traditional Chinese characters (traditional Chinese: /; simplified Chinese: /, Pinyin: Zhèngtǐzì/Fántǐzì)[1] are Chinese characters in any character set which does not contain newly created characters or character substitutions performed after 1946.[dubious ] Traditional Chinese characters are used in Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau, as well as in most overseas Chinese communities outside Southeast Asia
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Pinyin

Pinyin superseded older romanization systems such as Wade–Giles (1859; modified 1892) and postal romanization, and replaced zhuyin as the method of Chinese phonetic instruction in mainland China. The ISO adopted pinyin as the standard romanization for modern Chinese in 1982 (ISO 7098:1982, superseded by ISO 7098:2015). The United Nations followed suit in 1986.[1][51] It has also been accepted by the government of Singapore, the United States's Library of Congress, the American Library Association, and many other international institutions.[52][failed verification] The spelling of Chinese geographical or personal names in pinyin has become the most common way to transcribe them in English
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Baise
Baise (Chinese: 百色; pinyin: Bǎisè, Bósè; local pronunciation: paːk˧˥ ɬɐk˥), or Bose, is the westernmost prefecture-level city of Guangxi, China bordering Vietnam as well as the provinces of Guizhou and Yunnan. The name is from Youjiang Zhuang Baksaek, meaning "in, or blocking, a mountain pass". Baise is located in western-northwestern Guangxi bordering Qianxinan Buyei and Miao Autonomous Prefecture (Guizhou) to the north, Qujing and Wenshan Zhuang and Miao Autonomous Prefecture of Yunnan to the west, the Vietnamese provinces of Hà Giang and Cao Bằng to the south and southwest, and the Guangxi cities of Hechi to the northeast/east, Nanning to the east, and Chongzuo to the southeast. It is centrally located between three provincial capitals: Nanning, Kunming, and Guiyang
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New Guangxi Clique
After the founding of the Republic of China, Guangxi served as the base for one of the most powerful warlord cliques of China: the Old Guangxi clique. Led by Lu Rongting (陆荣廷) and others, the clique was able to take control of neighbouring Hunan and Guangdong provinces as well. The Old Guangxi clique crumbled in the early 1920s, and was replaced by the New Guangxi clique, led by Li Zongren, Huang Shaohong, and Bai Chongxi. In 1920, Chen Jiongming drove Lu Rongting and the Old Guangxi clique out of Guangdong, in the First Yue-Gui War. In 1921 Chen pushed into Guangxi, starting the Second Yue-Gui war, forcing Lu Rongting to step down in July 1921. By August, Chen had occupied Nanning and the rest of Guangxi. Chen Jiongming and the Cantonese forces occupied Guangxi until April 1922. Their occupation was largely nominal because armed bands of Guangxi loyalists began to gather under local commanders, calling themselves the Self-government Army
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Chiang Kai-shek

Chiang Kai-shek (31 October 1887 – 5 April 1975),[3] also known as Chiang Chung-cheng and romanized via Mandarin as Chiang Chieh-shih and Jiang Jieshi, was a Chinese Nationalist politician, revolutionary and military leader who served as the leader of the Republic of China between 1928 and 1975, first in mainland China until 1949 and then in Taiwan until his death. Born in Chekiang (Zhejiang) Province, Chiang was a member of the Kuomintang (KMT) and a lieutenant of Sun Yat-sen in the revolution to overthrow the Beiyang government and reunify China. With help from the Soviets and the Communist Party of China (CPC), Chiang organized the military for Sun's Canton Nationalist Government and headed the Whampoa Military Academy
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Guangxi
Guangxi ([kwàŋ.ɕí] (listen); alternately romanized as Kwanghsi; Chinese: 广西; Zhuang: Gvangjsih), officially the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region (GZAR), is an autonomous region of the People's Republic of China, located in South China and bordering Vietnam (Hà Giang, Cao Bằng, Lạng Sơn and Quảng Ninh Provinces) and the Gulf of Tonkin. Formerly a province, Guangxi became an autonomous region in 1958. Its current capital is Nanning.[5] Guangxi's location, in mountainous terrain in the far south of China, has placed it on the frontier of Chinese civilization throughout much of Chinese history. The current name "Guang" means "expanse" and has been associated with the region since the creation of Guang Prefecture in 226 AD. It was given provincial level status during the Yuan dynasty, but even into the 20th century it was considered an open, wild territory
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Zhang Yunyi
Zhang Yunyi (Chinese: 张云逸; August 10, 1892 – November 19, 1974), was a Communist revolutionary and military strategist of the People’s Republic of China.[1] Born in Wenchang, Hainan, he joined the Communist Party of China in 1926, and took part in the Northern Expedition, the Nanchang Uprising, the Baise Uprising, the Second Sino-Japanese War and the Chinese Civil War. Zhang held the posts of the army commander of the 7th Red Army, the assistant staff officer of the Military Commission of the Central Committee of the CPC, the commander of a military area, etc., and was named one of the ten Senior Generals (Da Jiang, the second highest rank in the PLA) in 1955.[2] The Zhang Yunyi Memorial Hall is located in Wenchang, Hainan Province. Zhang was born in a poor peasant family on August 10, 1892, in Wenchang, Hainan. At age eight he began studying at the Guangdong Army Primary School
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Baise Uprising
The Baise Uprising (simplified Chinese: 百色起义; traditional Chinese: 百色起義; pinyin: Bǎisè Qǐyì), also known as the Youjiang Riots (simplified Chinese: 右江暴动; traditional Chinese: 右江暴動; pinyin: Yòujiāng Bàodòng), was a successful military insurrection in late 1929 in Baise, Guangxi, China, instigated by the Communist Party of China using tense relations between warlords Yu Zuobai and Li Mingrui of the New Guangxi clique, that aimed at opposing Chiang Kai-shek and the Kuomintang party and seizing power by force
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