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Atlantic Ocean
The Atlantic Ocean
Ocean
is the second largest of the world's oceans with a total area of about 106,460,000 square kilometers (41,100,000 square miles).[2][3] It covers approximately 20 percent of the Earth's surface and about 29 percent of its water surface area. It separates the "Old World" from the "New World". The Atlantic Ocean
Ocean
occupies an elongated, S-shaped basin extending longitudinally between Eurasia
Eurasia
and Africa to the east, and the Americas to the west. As one component of the interconnected global ocean, it is connected in the north to the Arctic
Arctic
Ocean, to the Pacific Ocean
Ocean
in the southwest, the Indian Ocean
Ocean
in the southeast, and the Southern Ocean
Southern Ocean
in the south (other definitions describe the Atlantic as extending southward to Antarctica)
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Coastline Paradox
The coastline paradox is the counterintuitive observation that the coastline of a landmass does not have a well-defined length. This results from the fractal-like properties of coastlines, i.e. the fact that a coastline typically has a fractal dimension (which in fact makes the notion of length inapplicable). The first recorded observation of this phenomenon was by Lewis Fry Richardson[1] and it was expanded by Benoit Mandelbrot.[2] The measured length of the coastline depends on the method used to measure it. Since a landmass has features at all scales, from hundreds of kilometers in size to tiny fractions of a millimeter and below, there is no obvious size of the smallest feature that should be measured around, and hence no single well-defined perimeter to the landmass
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German Meteor Expedition
Expedition may refer to:An exploration, journey, or voyage undertaken by a group of people especially for discovery and scientific researchContents1 Places 2 Arts, entertainment, and media 3 Sports 4 Transportation 5 Other usesPlaces[edit] Expedition Island, a park in Green River, Wyoming, US Expedition Range, a mountain range in Queensland, AustraliaArts, entertainment, and media[edit] Expedition
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Stesichorus
Stesichorus
Stesichorus
(Greek: Στησίχορος, Stēsikhoros, c. 630–555 BC) was the first great lyric poet of the West. He is best known for telling epic stories in lyric metres[1] but he is also famous for some ancient traditions about his life, such as his opposition to the tyrant Phalaris, and the blindness he is said to have incurred and cured by composing verses first insulting and then flattering to Helen of Troy. He was ranked among the nine lyric poets esteemed by the scholars of Hellenistic
Hellenistic
Alexandria
Alexandria
and yet his work attracted relatively little interest among ancient commentators,[2] so that remarkably few fragments of his poetry now survive
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Histories (Herodotus)
The Histories (Greek: Ἱστορίαι; Ancient Greek: [his.to.rí.ai̯]; also known as The History[1]) of Herodotus
Herodotus
is now considered the founding work of history in Western literature.[2] Written in 440 BC in the Ionic dialect
Ionic dialect
of classical Greek, The Histories serves as a record of the ancient traditions, politics, geography, and clashes of various cultures that were known in Western Asia, Northern Africa
Northern Africa
and Greece
Greece
at that time.[citation needed] Although not a fully impartial record, it remains one of the West's most important sources regarding these affairs
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South Sudan
Coordinates: 8°N 30°E / 8°N 30°E / 8; 30 Republic
Republic
of South SudanFlagCoat of armsMotto: "Justice, Liberty, Prosperity"Anthem: "South Sudan
Sudan
Oyee!"Capital and largest
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Herodotus
Herodotus
Herodotus
(/hɪˈrɒdətəs/; Ancient Greek: Ἡρόδοτος, Hêródotos, Attic Greek
Attic Greek
pronunciation: [hɛː.ró.do.tos]) was a Greek historian who was born in Halicarnassus
Halicarnassus
in the Persian Empire (modern-day Bodrum, Turkey) and lived in the fifth century BC (c. 484–c. 425 BC), a contemporary of Thucydides, Socrates, and Euripides
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International Space Station
The International Space Station
International Space Station
(ISS) is a space station, or a habitable artificial satellite, in low Earth
Earth
orbit. Its first component launched into orbit in 1998, the last pressurised module was fitted in 2011, and the station is expected to be used until 2028. Development and assembly of the station continues, with components scheduled for launch in 2018 and 2019. The ISS is the largest human-made body in low Earth
Earth
orbit and can often be seen with the naked eye from Earth.[8][9] The ISS consists of pressurised modules, external trusses, solar arrays, and other components
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Expedition 29
(l-r) Furukawa, Fossum, Volkov, Ivanishin, Burbank and Shkaplerov ISS expeditions← Expedition 28 Expedition 30 → Expedition 29
Expedition 29
was the 29th long-duration expedition to the International Space Station
International Space Station
(ISS)
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Challenger Expedition
The Challenger expedition
Challenger expedition
of 1872–76 was a scientific exercise that made many discoveries to lay the foundation of oceanography. The expedition was named after the mother vessel, HMS Challenger. Prompted by Charles Wyville Thomson—of the University of Edinburgh and Merchiston Castle School—the Royal Society of London
Royal Society of London
obtained the use of Challenger from the Royal Navy
Royal Navy
and in 1872 modified the ship for scientific tasks, equipping her with separate laboratories for natural history and chemistry. The expedition, led by Captain George Nares, sailed from Portsmouth, England, on 21 December 1872.[1] Other naval officers included Commander John Maclear.[2] Under the scientific supervision of Thomson himself, she traveled nearly 70,000 nautical miles (130,000 km) surveying and exploring
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Columbia University
Columbia University
Columbia University
(Columbia; officially Columbia University
Columbia University
in the City of New York), established in 1754, is a private Ivy League research university in Upper Manhattan, New York City. Columbia contains the oldest college in the state of New York and is the fifth chartered institution of higher learning in the United States, making it one of nine colonial colleges founded prior to the Declaration of Independence.[9] It was established as King's College by royal charter of George II of Great Britain
George II of Great Britain
and renamed Columbia College in 1784 following the American Revolutionary War. The college has produced numerous distinguished alumni
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Titan (mythology)
In Greek mythology, the Titans (Greek: Τιτάν, Titán, plural: Τiτᾶνες, Titânes) and Titanesses (or Titanides; Greek: Τιτανίς, Titanís, plural: Τιτανίδες, Titanídes) were members of the second generation of divine beings, descending from the primordial deities and preceding the Olympians. Based on Mount Othrys, the Titans most famously included the first twelve children of Gaia (Mother Earth) and Uranus (Father Sky)
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Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
The Lamont–Doherty Earth Observatory
Lamont–Doherty Earth Observatory
(LDEO) is a research unit of Columbia University
Columbia University
located on a 157-acre (64 ha) campus in Palisades, N.Y., 18 miles (29 km) north of Manhattan
Manhattan
on the Hudson River.Contents1 History 2 Mission statement 3 Major achievements 4 Major divisions4.1 Biology and paleo environment 4.2 Geochemistry 4.3 Marine geology and geophysics 4.4 Ocean and climate physics 4.5 Division of seismology, geology and tectonophysics 4.6 Office of Marine Operations and R/V Marcus G
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Greek Mythology
Greek mythology
Greek mythology
is the body of myths and teachings that belong to the ancient Greeks, concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world, and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. It was a part of the religion in ancient Greece. Modern scholars refer to and study the myths in an attempt to shed light on the religious and political institutions of ancient Greece and its civilization, and to gain understanding of the nature of myth-making itself.[1] Greek mythology
Greek mythology
has had an extensive influence on the culture, arts, and literature of Western civilization and remains part of Western heritage and language
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Atlas (geography)
An atlas is a collection of maps; it is typically a bundle of maps of Earth
Earth
or a region of Earth. Atlases have traditionally been bound into book form, but today many atlases are in multimedia formats. In addition to presenting geographic features and political boundaries, many atlases often feature geopolitical, social, religious and economic statistics
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Ancient Greece
Ancient Greece
Greece
was a civilization belonging to a period of Greek history from the Greek Dark Ages
Greek Dark Ages
of the 13th–9th centuries BC to the end of antiquity (c. 600 AD). Immediately following this period was the beginning of the Early Middle Ages
Middle Ages
and the Byzantine
Byzantine
era.[1] Roughly three centuries after the Late Bronze Age collapse
Late Bronze Age collapse
of Mycenaean Greece, Greek urban poleis began to form in the 8th century BC, ushering in the period of Archaic Greece
Archaic Greece
and colonization of the Mediterranean Basin. This was followed by the period of Classical Greece, an era that began with the Greco-Persian Wars, lasting from the 5th to 4th centuries BC
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