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A40 Road
The A40 is a major trunk road connecting London to Goodwick (Fishguard), Wales, and officially called The London to Fishguard Trunk Road (A40) in all legal documents and Acts. It is 262 miles (422 km) long. It is one of the few remaining of the "old" trunk routes not to have been superseded by a direct motorway link, though some parts, such as the southern section from London to Oxford are now better served by the M40
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English Local Authorities
The pattern of local government in England is complex, with the distribution of functions varying according to the local arrangements. Legislation concerning local government in England is decided by the Parliament and Government of the United Kingdom, because England does not have a devolved parliament or regional assemblies, outside Greater London.

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A312 Road (Great Britain)
List of A roads in zone 3 in Great Britain starting west of the A3 and south of the A4 (roads beginning with 3).

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A38 Road (Great Britain)
The A38, part of which is also known as the Devon Expressway, is a major A-class trunk road in England. The road runs from Bodmin in Cornwall to Mansfield in Nottinghamshire. It is 292 miles (470 km) long, making it the longest 2-digit A road in England. It was formerly known as the Leeds–Exeter Trunk Road, when this description also included the A61
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A355 Road (Great Britain)
List of A roads in zone 3 in Great Britain starting west of the A3 and south of the A4 (roads beginning with 3).

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Llandovery
Llandovery (Welsh: Llanymddyfri) is a community and market town in Carmarthenshire, Wales. It lies on the River Tywi and the junction of the A40 and A483 roads, around 25 miles (40 km) northeast of Carmarthen and 27 miles (43 km) north of Swansea. Llandovery's Welsh name is derived from Llan ymlith y dyfroedd, meaning "church enclosure amidst the waters" and referring to the town's position between the River Tywi and the Afon Brân just upstream of their confluence. A smaller watercourse, the Bawddwr, runs through and under the town. The town is served by Llandovery railway station, on the Heart of Wales line, with services to Swansea and Shrewsbury
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A46 Road (Great Britain)
The A46 is an A road in England. It starts east of Bath, Somerset and ends in Cleethorpes, Lincolnshire, but it does not form a continuous route. Large portions of the old road have been lost, bypassed, or replaced by motorway development
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Brecon
Brecon (/ˈbrɛkən/; Welsh: Aberhonddu pronounced [ˌabɛrˈhɔnðɪ]), archaically known as Brecknock, is a market town and community in Powys, Wales, with a population in 2001 of 7,901, increasing to 8,250 at the 2011 census. Historically it was the county town of Brecknockshire; although its role as such was eclipsed with the formation of the County of Powys, it remains an important local centre. Brecon is the third-largest town in Powys, after Newtown and Ystradgynlais
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Abergavenny
Abergavenny (/ˌæbərɡəˈvɛni/; Welsh: Y Fenni pronounced [ə ˈvɛnɪ], archaically Abergafenni meaning "Mouth of the River Gavenny") is a market town in Monmouthshire, Wales. Abergavenny is promoted as a Gateway to Wales. It is located on the A40 trunk road and the A465 Heads of the Valleys road and is approximately 6 miles (9.7 km) from the border with England. Originally the site of a Roman fort, Gobannium, it became a medieval walled town within the Welsh Marches
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Monmouth
Monmouth (/ˈmɒnməθ/ MON-məth, /ˈmʌn-/ MUN-; Welsh: Trefynwy meaning "town on the Monnow") is the historic county town of Monmouthshire, Wales. It is situated where the River Monnow meets the River Wye, within 2 miles (3.2 km) of the border with England. The town is 30 miles (48 km) northeast of Cardiff, and 113 miles (182 km) west of London. It is within the Monmouthshire local authority, and the parliamentary constituency of Monmouth. Monmouth's population in the 2011 census was 10,508, rising from 8,877 in 2001. The town was the site of a small Roman fort, Blestium, and became established after the Normans built a castle here after 1067. Its medieval stone gated bridge is the only one of its type remaining in Britain. The castle later came into the possession of the House of Lancaster, and was the birthplace of King Henry V in 1387
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Gloucester
Gloucester (/ˈɡlɒstər/ (About this sound listen)) is a city and district in southwest England, the county city of Gloucestershire. Gloucester lies close to the Welsh border, on the River Severn, between the Cotswolds to the east and the Forest of Dean to the southwest. Gloucester was founded in AD 97 by the Romans under Emperor Nerva as Colonia Glevum Nervensis, and was granted its first charter in 1155 by King Henry II
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Cheltenham
Cheltenham /ˈɛltnəm/, also known as Cheltenham Spa, is a regency spa town and borough which is located on the edge of the Cotswolds, an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty in Gloucestershire, England. With a motto of Salubritas et Eruditio meaning 'health and education', Cheltenham has been a health and holiday spa town resort since the discovery of mineral springs in 1716 and has a high number of internationally renowned and historic schools. The town hosts several festivals of culture, often featuring nationally and internationally famous contributors and attendees
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Beaconsfield
Beaconsfield (/ˈbɛkənzfld/ (About this sound listen) BEK-ənz-feeld) is a market town and civil parish within the South Bucks district in Buckinghamshire centred 23.6 miles (38 km) WNW of London and 17 miles (27 km) SSE of the county's administrative town, Aylesbury. Four towns are within five miles: Slough, Amersham, Gerrards Cross and High Wycombe. The town is adjacent to the Chiltern Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and has a wide area of Georgian, neo-Georgian and Tudor revival high street architecture, known as the Old Town
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Primary Status
The United Kingdom has a network of roads, of varied quality and capacity, totalling about 262,300 miles (422,100 km). Road distances are shown in miles or yards and UK speed limits are indicated in miles per hour (mph) or by the use of the national speed limit (NSL) symbol. Some vehicle categories have various lower maximum limits enforced by speed limiters. Enforcement of UK road speed limits increasingly uses speed guns, automated in-vehicle systems and automated roadside traffic cameras. A unified numbering system is in place for Great Britain, whilst in Northern Ireland, there is no available explanation for the allocation of road numbers. The earliest specifically engineered roads were built during the British Iron Age. The road network was expanded during the Roman occupation. Some of these survive and others were lost. New roads were added in the Middle Ages and from the 17th century onwards
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Fishguard
Fishguard (Welsh: Abergwaun, meaning "Mouth of the River Gwaun") is a coastal town in Pembrokeshire, south-west Wales, with a population of 3,419 recorded in the 2011 Census. The community of Fishguard and Goodwick had a population of 5,043 in 2001 and 5,407 in 2011. The town is divided into two parts, the main town of Fishguard and Lower Fishguard. Lower Fishguard (locally known as 'Lower Town') is believed to be the site of the original hamlet from which modern Fishguard has grown. It is situated in a deep valley where the River Gwaun meets the sea, hence the Welsh name for Fishguard. It is a typical fishing village with a short tidal quay. The settlement stretches along the north slope of the valley. The main town contains the parish church, the High Street and most of the modern development, and lies upon the hill to the south of Lower Fishguard, to which it is joined by a steep and winding hill
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