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Gallia Lugdunensis
Gallia Lugdunensis (French: ''Gaule Lyonnaise'') was a province A province is almost always an administrative division Administrative division, administrative unitArticle 3(1). , country subdivision, administrative region, subnational entity, first-level subdivision, as well as many similar terms, are g ... of the Roman Empire The Roman Empire ( la, Imperium Rōmānum ; grc-gre, Βασιλεία τῶν Ῥωμαίων, Basileía tôn Rhōmaíōn) was the post-Republican Republican can refer to: Political ideology * An advocate of a republic, a type of governme ... in what is now the modern country of France France (), officially the French Republic (french: link=no, République française), is a List of transcontinental countries, transcontinental country spanning Western Europe and Overseas France, overseas regions and territories in the Ame ..., part of the Celtic The words Celt and Celtic (also Keltic) may refer to: Ethno-linguistics *Celts ...
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Roman Province
The Roman provinces (Latin: ''provincia'', pl. ''provinciae'') were the administrative regions of Ancient Rome outside Roman Italy that were controlled by the Romans under the Roman Republic and later the Roman Empire. Each province was ruled by a Roman appointed as Roman governor, governor. For centuries it was the largest administrative unit of the foreign possessions of ancient Rome. With the administrative reform initiated by Diocletian, it became a third level administrative subdivision of the Roman Empire, or rather a subdivision of the Roman diocese, imperial dioceses (in turn subdivisions of the Praetorian prefect, imperial prefectures). Overview A province was the basic and, until the tetrarchy (from 293 AD), the largest territorial and administrative unit of the empire's territorial possessions outside Roman Italy. The word ''province'' in Modern English has its origins in the Latin term used by the Romans. Provinces were generally governed by politicians of Roman ...
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Marne (river)
The Marne () is a river A river is a natural flowing watercourse, usually freshwater, flowing towards an ocean, sea, lake or another river. In some cases, a river flows into the ground and becomes dry at the end of its course without reaching another body of wate ... in France France (), officially the French Republic (french: link=no, République française), is a transcontinental country This is a list of countries located on more than one continent A continent is one of several large landmasses ..., an eastern tributary A tributary, or affluent, is a stream A stream is a body of water (Lysefjord) in Norway Norway, officially the Kingdom of Norway,Names in the official and recognised languages: Bokmål Bokmål (, ; literally "book tongue") ... of the Seine ) , mouth_location = Le Havre Le Havre (, ; nrf, Lé Hâvre) is an urban French commune A commune is an intentional community of people shari ...
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Diocese Of Britain
In Ecclesiastical polity, church governance, a diocese or bishopric is the ecclesiastical district under the jurisdiction of a bishop. History In the later organization of the Roman Empire, the increasingly subdivided Roman province, provinces were administratively associated in a larger unit, the Roman diocese, diocese (Latin ''dioecesis'', from the Greek language, Greek term διοίκησις, meaning "administration"). Christianity was given legal status in 313 with the Edict of Milan. Churches began to organize themselves into Roman diocese, dioceses based on the Roman diocese, civil dioceses, not on the larger regional imperial districts. These dioceses were often smaller than the Roman province, provinces. Christianity was declared the Empire's State church of the Roman Empire, official religion by Theodosius I in 380. Constantine the Great, Constantine I in 318 gave litigants the right to have court cases transferred from the civil courts to the bishops. This situ ...
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Diocese Of Viennensis
The Diocese of the Seven Provinces ( la, Dioecesis Septem Provinciarum), originally called the Diocese of Vienne ( la, Dioecesis Viennensis) after the city of ''Vienna'' (modern Vienne, Isère, Vienne), was a Roman diocese, diocese of the later Roman Empire, under the praetorian prefecture of Gaul. It encompassed southern and western Roman Gaul, Gaul (Aquitania and Gallia Narbonensis), that is, modern France south and west of the Loire, including Provence. The diocese comprised the following provinces: Gallia Aquitania, Aquitanica I, Gallia Aquitania, Aquitanica II, Novempopulana (Aquitanica III), Gallia Narbonensis, Narbonensis I, Gallia Narbonensis, Narbonensis II, Viennensis and Alpes Maritimae. History The diocese was established during the reforms of Diocletian who reigned from 284-305. It is attested early in the reign of Constantine I in the Verona List which has been dated to around 314. In 402 an annual provincial assembly, the ''Concilium septem provinciarum'', was esta ...
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Province
A province is almost always an administrative division Administrative division, administrative unitArticle 3(1). , country subdivision, administrative region, subnational entity, first-level subdivision, as well as many similar terms, are generic names for geographical areas into which a particular ... within a country A country is a distinct territorial body or political entity A polity is an identifiable political entity—any group of people who have a collective identity, who are organized by some form of Institutionalisation, institutionalized social ... or state State may refer to: Arts, entertainment, and media Literature * ''State Magazine'', a monthly magazine published by the U.S. Department of State * The State (newspaper), ''The State'' (newspaper), a daily newspaper in Columbia, South Carolina, Un .... The term derives from the ancient Roman In historiography, ancient Rome is Roman people, Roman civilization from the founding of the Italian ci ...
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Diocese Of Gaul
:''See Christianity in Gaul'' for the 4th-century ecclesiastical dioceses in Roman Gaul'' The Diocese of Gaul (Latin language, Latin: Dioecesis Galliarum, "diocese of the Gaul [province]s") was a Roman diocese, diocese of the later Roman Empire, under the praetorian prefecture of Gaul. It encompassed northern and eastern Roman Gaul, Gaul, that is, modern France north and east of the Loire, including the Low Countries and modern Germany west of the Rhine. The diocese comprised the following provinces: Gallia Lugdunensis, Gallia Lugdunensis I, Gallia Lugdunensis, Gallia Lugdunensis II, Gallia Lugdunensis, Gallia Lugdunensis III, Gallia Lugdunensis, Gallia Lugdunensis IV (Senonia), Gallia Belgica, Belgica I, Gallia Belgica, Belgica II, Germania Prima, Germania I, Germania Secunda, Germania II, Alpes Poenninae et Graiae and Maxima Sequanorum. History The diocese was established after the reforms of Diocletian and Constantine I in c. 314. In the year 407, the Rhine frontier was breac ...
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Tetrarchy
The Tetrarchy was the system instituted by Roman Emperor The Roman emperor was the ruler of the Roman Empire during the imperial period (starting in 27 BC). The emperors used a variety of different titles throughout history. Often when a given Roman is described as becoming "emperor" in English, it ... Diocletian Diocletian (; la, Gaius Aurelius Valerius Diocletianus; born Diocles; 22 December c. 244 – 3 December 311) was from 284 to 305. Born to a family of low status in , Diocletian rose through the ranks of the military to become a commander of ... in 293 to govern the ancient Roman Empire by dividing it between two senior emperors, the ''augusti 300px, Coin of the emperor Diocletian, marked ''Augustus'' (plural ''augusti''; , ; "majestic", "great" or "venerable") was an ancient Roman In historiography Historiography is the study of the methods of historian ( 484– 425 ...'', and their juniors and designated successors, the ''caesare ...
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Diocletian
Diocletian (; la, Gaius Aurelius Valerius Diocletianus; born Diocles; 22 December c. 244 – 3 December 311) was from 284 to 305. Born to a family of low status in , Diocletian rose through the ranks of the military to become a commander of the Emperor 's army. After the deaths of Carus and his son on campaign in Persia, Diocletian was proclaimed emperor. The title was also claimed by Carus's surviving son, , but Diocletian defeated him in the . Diocletian's reign stabilized the empire and ended the . He appointed fellow officer as , co-emperor, in 286. Diocletian reigned in the , and Maximian reigned in the . Diocletian delegated further on 1 March 293, appointing and as junior co-emperors (each with the title ), under himself and Maximian respectively. Under the , or "rule of four", each emperor would rule over a quarter-division of the empire. Diocletian secured the empire's borders and purged it of all threats to his power. He defeated the ns and during several camp ...
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Legatus
A ''legatus'' (anglicised Linguistic anglicisation (or anglicization, occasionally anglification, anglifying, or Englishing) is the practice of modifying foreign words, names, and phrases to make them easier to spell, pronounce, or understand in English language, English. ... as legate) was a high-ranking Roman military officer in the Roman Army The Roman army (Latin Latin (, or , ) is a classical language A classical language is a language A language is a structured system of communication Communication (from Latin ''communicare'', meaning "to share" or "to be in ..., equivalent to a modern high-ranking general officer A general officer is an Officer (armed forces), officer of highest military ranks, high rank in the army, armies, and in some nations' air forces, space forces, or marines. In some usages the term "general officer" refers to a rank above colo .... Initially used to delegate power, the term became formalised under Augustus ...
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Germania Superior
Germania Superior ("Upper Germania Germania ( , ), also called Magna Germania (English: ''Great Germania''), Germania Libera (English: ''Free Germania'') or Germanic Barbaricum Barbaricum (from the gr, Βαρβαρικόν, "foreign", "barbarian") is a geographical name used by ...") was an imperial province An imperial province was a Roman province The Roman provinces (Latin: ''provincia'', pl. ''provinciae'') were the administrative regions of Ancient Rome outside Roman Italy that were controlled by the Romans under the Roman Republic and lat ... of the Roman Empire The Roman Empire ( la, Imperium Rōmānum ; grc-gre, Βασιλεία τῶν Ῥωμαίων, Basileía tôn Rhōmaíōn) was the post-Republican Republican can refer to: Political ideology * An advocate of a republic, a type of governme .... It comprised an area of today's western Switzerland , french: Suisse(sse), it, svizzero/svizzera or , rm, Svizzer/Svizra , government_type ...
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Loire
The Loire (, also ; ; oc, Léger, ; la, Liger) is the longest river in France and the 171st longest in the world. With a length of , it drains , more than a fifth of France's land while its average discharge is only half that of the Rhône The Rhône ( , ; german: Rhone ; wae, Rotten ; it, Rodano ; frp, Rôno ; oc, Ròse ) is one of the major rivers of Europe and has twice the average discharge of the Loire The Loire (, also ; ; oc, Léger; la, Liger) is the longest r .... It rises in the southeastern quarter of the French Massif Central The Massif Central (; oc, Massís Central, ; literally ''"Central Massif"'') is a highland Highlands or uplands are any mountainous region or elevated mountainous plateau. Generally speaking, upland (or uplands) refers to ranges of hills, typi ... in the Cévennes The Cévennes ( , ; oc, Cevenas) is a cultural region and mountain range, range of mountains in south-central France, on the south-east edge of the Massif ...
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Augustus
Caesar Augustus (23 September 63 BC19 August AD 14) was the first Roman emperor The Roman emperor was the ruler of the Roman Empire during the imperial period (starting in 27 BC). The emperors used a variety of different titles throughout history. Often when a given Roman is described as becoming "emperor" in English, it ..., reigning from 27 BC until his death in AD 14. His status as the founder of the Roman Principate The Principate is the name sometimes given to the first period of the Roman Empire from the beginning of the reign of Augustus Caesar Augustus (23 September 63 BC19 August AD 14) was the first Roman emperor, reigning from 27 BC until ... (the first phase of the Roman Empire The Roman Empire ( la, Imperium Rōmānum ; grc-gre, Βασιλεία τῶν Ῥωμαίων, Basileía tôn Rhōmaíōn) was the post- period of . As a it included large territorial holdings around the in , , and ruled by . From the t ...) has ...
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