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Calash
A barouche is a large, open, four-wheeled carriage A carriage is a private four-wheeled vehicle for people and is most commonly horse-drawn A horse-drawn vehicle is a mechanized piece of equipment pulled by one horse or by a team of horses. These vehicles typically had two or four wheels an ..., both heavy and luxurious, drawn by two horses. It was fashionable throughout the 19th century. Its body provides seats for four passengers, two back-seat passengers vis-à-vis two behind the coachman's high box-seat. A leather roof can be raised to give back-seat passengers some protection from the weather. Etymology ''Barouche'' is an anglicisation Linguistic anglicisation (or anglicization, occasionally anglification, anglifying, or Englishing) is the practice of modifying foreign words, names, and phrases to make them easier to spell, pronounce, or understand in English English usually ... of the German German(s) may refer to: Common uses * of or related to Germany * ...
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Carriage
A carriage is a private four-wheeled vehicle for people and is most commonly horse-drawn A horse-drawn vehicle is a mechanized piece of equipment pulled by one horse or by a team of horses. These vehicles typically had two or four wheels and were used to carry passengers and/or a load. They were once common worldwide, but they have mos .... Second-hand private carriages were common public transport, the equivalent of modern cars used as taxis. Carriage suspension Suspension or suspended may refer to: Science and engineering * Suspension (topology), in mathematics * Suspension (dynamical systems), in mathematics * Suspension of a ring, in mathematics * Suspension (chemistry), small solid particles suspended ...s are by leather strapping and, on those made in recent centuries, steel springs. Two-wheeled carriages are informal and usually owner-driven. Coaches are a special category within carriages. They are carriages with four corner posts and a fixed roof. Two-wheeled wa ...
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Chaise
A one-horse chaise A three-wheeled "Handchaise", Germany, around 1900, designed to be pushed by a person A chaise, sometimes called chay or shay, is a light two- or four-wheeled traveling or pleasure carriage for one or two people with a folding hood or Barouche#Calash, calash top. The name, in use in England before 1700, came from the French language, French word "chaise" (meaning "chair") through a transference from a Sedan chair, sedan-chair to a wheeled vehicle. Design The two-wheeled version, usually of a chair-backed type, for one or two persons, also called a ''Gig (carriage), gig'' or ''one-horse shay'', had a body hung on leather straps or thorough-braces and was usually drawn by one horse; a light chaise having two seats was a ''double chair''. A ''chaise-cart'' was a light carriage fitted with Suspension (vehicle), suspension, used for transporting lightweight goods. A ''bath chair'' was a hooded and sometimes glassed wheeled chair used especially by invalids; it ...
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Horse-drawn Vehicle
A horse-drawn vehicle is a mechanized piece of equipment pulled by one horse The horse (''Equus ferus caballus'') is a domesticated Domestication is a sustained multi-generational relationship in which one group of organisms assumes a significant degree of influence over the reproduction and care of another group to ... or by a team of horses. These vehicles typically had two or four wheels and were used to carry passengers and/or a load. They were once common worldwide, but they have mostly been replaced by automobile A car (or automobile) is a wheeled motor vehicle A motor vehicle, also known as motorized vehicle or automotive vehicle, is a self-propelled vehicle, commonly wheeled, that does not operate on Track (rail transport), rails (such as trains o ...s and other forms of self-propelled transport. General Horses were domesticated circa 3500 BCE. Prior to that oxen were used. Historically a wide variety of arrangements of horses and vehicles have been use ...
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Victoria (carriage)
The victoria is an elegant carriage style of French origin, possibly based on a Phaeton (carriage), phaeton made for George IV of the United Kingdom, George IV. A victoria may be visualised as essentially a Phaeton (carriage), phaeton or Brougham (carriage), brougham with the addition of a coachman's box-seat, but not enclosed and therefore open to the elements. Though in English the name ''victoria'' was not employed for a carriage before 1870,, asserts, however, that it was named after Queen Victoria, Princess Victoria in the 1830s. when one was imported to England by Edward VII, then Prince of Wales, in 1869, the type was made some time before 1844. In 1845 the renowned de Rosemont sisters Olympe, Rosalie, Lydia and Laureline de Rosemont, who were well known for championing new vehicles, machines and fashions, purchased one. It was very popular amongst wealthy families. Diarist Lady Leonora Elmtree-Gray writes about her friend, an otherwise unidentifiable ‘Luceline’, getting ...
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Vehicle
A vehicle (from la, vehiculum) is a machine A machine is any physical system with ordered structural and functional properties. It may represent human-made or naturally occurring device molecular machine A molecular machine, nanite, or nanomachine is a molecular component that produce ... that transport Transport (in British English British English (BrE) is the standard dialect of the English language English is a West Germanic languages, West Germanic language first spoken in History of Anglo-Saxon England, early medieval Engl ...s people or cargo In economics, the word cargo refers in particular to goods or produce being conveyed—generally for Commerce, commercial gain—by water, air or land. "Freight" is the money paid to carry cargo. ''Cargo'' was originally a shipload. Cargo n .... Vehicles include wagon A wagon or waggon is a heavy four-wheeled vehicle pulled by draught animals or on occasion by humans, used for transporting G ...
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Hood (soft Top)
Hood may refer to: Covering Apparel * Hood (headgear), type of head covering ** Article of Academic dress#Hood, academic dress ** Bondage hood, sex toy * Hoodie, hooded sweatshirt Anatomy * Clitoral hood, a hood of skin surrounding the clitoris * Hood, a flap of skin behind the head of a cobra Other coverings * Fume hood, piece of laboratory safety equipment * Hood (car), covering over the engine compartment in a motor vehicle ('bonnet' in most Commonwealth countries) * Kitchen hood, exhaust system for a stove or cooktop * Lens hood, device used to block light from creating glare in photographs Rail transport uses * Hood (rail transport), a rigid cover to protect a load on a flat wagon or a coil car * Hood unit, a type of diesel or electric locomotive ** Long hood ** Short hood Art, entertainment and media Fictional entities * Hood (comics), fictional Marvel Comics character * Hood (Malazan), fictional god in the ''Malazan Book of the Fallen'' universe * Hood (Thunderbirds) ...
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Prince William Of Wales & Prince Henry Of Wales
A prince is a Monarch, male ruler (ranked below a king, grand prince, and grand duke) or a male member of a monarch's or former monarch's family. ''Prince'' is also a title of nobility (often highest), often hereditary title, hereditary, in some European State (polity), states. The feminine equivalent is a princess. The English language, English word derives, via the French language, French word ''prince'', from the Latin noun , from (first) and (to seize), meaning "the first, foremost, the chief, most distinguished, noble monarch, ruler, prince". Historical background The Latin word (older Latin *prīsmo-kaps, literally "the one who takes the first [place/position]"), became the usual title of the informal leader of the Roman senate some centuries before the transition to Roman Empire, empire, the ''princeps senatus''. Emperor Augustus established the formal position of monarch on the basis of principate, not Dominate, dominion. He also tasked his grandsons as summer rul ...
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Carriage Horse
Driving, when applied to horses, pony, ponies, mules, or donkeys, is a broad term for hitching equidae, equines to a wagon, carriage, cart, sleigh, or other horse-drawn vehicle by means of a horse harness, harness and working them in this way. It encompasses a wide range of activities from pleasure driving, to harness racing, to farm work, horse shows, and even international combined driving. Styles For horse training purposes, "driving" may also include the practice of ''long-lining'' (''long reining''), wherein a horse is driven without a cart by a handler walking behind or behind and to the side of the animal. This technique is used in the early stages of training horses for riding as well as for driving. Horses, mules and donkeys are driven in horse harness, harness in many different ways. For working purposes, they can pull a plow or other farm equipment designed to be pulled by animals. In many parts of the world they still pull carts, wagons, horse-drawn boats or loggi ...
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Abraham Lincoln's Carriage (barouche), C
Abraham, ''Ibrāhīm''; el, Ἀβραάμ, translit=Abraám, name=, group= (originally Abram) is the common patriarch of the Abrahamic religions, including Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. In Judaism, he is the founding father of the covenant of the pieces, the special relationship between the Hebrews and God in Judaism, God; in Christianity, he is the spiritual progenitor of all believers, Jewish or Gentile; and in Islam he is seen as a link in the Prophets and messengers in Islam, chain of prophets that begins with Adam and culminates in Muhammad. The narrative in the Book of Genesis revolves around the themes of posterity and land. Abraham is called by God in Abrahamic religions, God to leave the house of his father Terah and settle in the land originally given to Canaan (biblical figure), Canaan but which God now promises to Abraham and Abraham's family tree, his progeny. Various candidates are put forward who might inherit the land after Abraham; and, while promises are ...
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Emma (novel)
''Emma'', by Jane Austen, is a novel about youthful hubris and romantic misunderstandings. It is set in the fictional country village of Highbury and the surrounding estates of Hartfield, Randalls and Donwell Abbey, and involves the relationships among people from a small number of families. The novel was first published in December 1815, with its title page listing a publication date of 1816. As in her other novels, Austen explores the concerns and difficulties of genteel women living in Georgian era, Georgian–Regency era, Regency England. ''Emma'' is a comedy of manners, and depicts issues of marriage, sex, Ageing, age, and social status. Before she began the novel, Austen wrote, "I am going to take a heroine whom no one but myself will much like." In the first sentence, she introduces the title character as "Emma Woodhouse, handsome, clever, and rich, with a comfortable home and a happy disposition... had lived nearly twenty-one years in the world with very little to distre ...
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Jane Austen
Jane Austen (; 16 December 1775 – 18 July 1817) was an English novelist known primarily for her six major novels, which interpret, critique and comment upon the British landed gentry The landed gentry, or the ''gentry'', is a largely historical British social class of landowners who could live entirely from rental income Renting, also known as hiring or letting, is an agreement where a payment is made for the temp ... at the end of the 18th century. Austen's plots often explore the dependence of women on marriage in the pursuit of favourable social standing and economic security. Her works critique the novels of sensibility of the second half of the 18th century and are part of the transition to 19th-century literary realism Literary realism is a literary genre, part of the broader realism (arts), realism in arts, that attempts to represent subject-matter truthfully, avoiding speculative fiction and fantasy literature, supernatural elements. It originate ...
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