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Volvo Buses (Volvo Bus Corporation / formal name: Volvo Bussar AB) (stylized as VOLVO) is a subsidiary and a business area of the Swedish vehicle maker Volvo, which became an independent division in 1968. It is based in Gothenburg.

It is the world's largest bus manufacturer, with a complete range of heavy buses for passenger transportation. The product range includes complete buses and coaches as well as chassis combined with a comprehensive range of services.

The bus operation has a global presence, with production in Europe, North and South America, Asia and Australia. In India it set up its production facility in Bangalore. Former production facility was

Volvo Buses (Volvo Bus Corporation / formal name: Volvo Bussar AB) (stylized as VOLVO) is a subsidiary and a business area of the Swedish vehicle maker Volvo, which became an independent division in 1968. It is based in Gothenburg.

It is the world's largest bus manufacturer, with a complete range of heavy buses for passenger transportation. The product range includes complete buses and coaches as well as chassis combined with a comprehensive range of services.

The bus operation has a global presence, with production in Europe, North and South America, Asia and Australia. In India it set up its production facility in Bangalore. Former production facility was located in Irvine, Scotland (closed in 2000).

Products

Chassis

Codes in parentheses are VIN codes for the chassis models.

Historical

  • 1930s/40s: B10, B12
  • 1950s: B627
  • 1950s-1960s: B615/B616/B617
  • 1950s-1960s: B635/B638
  • 1950s-1960s: B705
  • 1950s-1960s: B725/B727
  • 1951-1963: B655 (mid-engine)/B656/B657/B658
  • 1960s: B715
  • 1963-1965: B755
  • 1960s-1980s: B57 & BB57
  • 1965-1982: B58
  • 1966-1971: B54
  • 1970-1980: B59
  • 1973-1985: Ailsa B55
  • 1978-2001: B10M/B10MA/B10MD (1M) – the double deck city bus version B10MD, built from 1982 to 1993, was also known as Citybus
    • 1983–1996? B9M (9M) – low-budget version of the B10M
    • 1988–1991 B10C (1C) – special Australian coach version of the B10M
  • 1978-1991: B10R (1R)
  • 1978-1987?: bus manufacturer, with a complete range of heavy buses for passenger transportation. The product range includes complete buses and coaches as well as chassis combined with a comprehensive range of services.

    The bus operation has a global presence, with production in Europe, North and South America, Asia and Australia. In India it set up its production facility in Bangalore. Former production facility was located in Irvine, Scotland (closed in 2000).

    Codes in parentheses are VIN codes for the chassis models.

    Historical

    • 1930s/40s: B10, B12
    • 1950s: B627
    • 1950s-1960s: B615/B616/B617
    • 1950s-1960s: B635/B638
    • 1950s-1960s: B705
    • 1950s-1960s: B725/B727
    • 1951-1963: B655 (mid-engine)/B656/B657/B658
    • 1960s: B715
    • 1963-1965: B755
    • 1960s-1980s: B57 & BB57
    • 1965-1982: B58
    • 1966-1971: B54
    • 1970-1980: B59
    • 1973-1985: Ailsa B55
    • 1978-2001: B10M/B10MA/B10MD (1M) – the double deck city bus version B10MD, built from 1982 to 1993, was also known as Citybus
      • 1983–1996? B9M (9M) – low-budget version of the B10M
      • 1988–1991 B10C (1C) – special Australian coach version of the B10M
    • 1978-1991: B10R (1R)
    • 1978-1987?: B6F/B6FA (6A)
    • 198?-198?: B6M (6M) – for Asia Pacific
    • 1990-2002: B10B (R1)
    • 1991-2011: B12 (R2) – known as B12R, later B380R/B420R in Brazil
    • 1991-1998: B6/B6LE (R3)
    • 1992-2000: Olympian (YN) – modified from Leyland Olympian
    • 1992-2004: B10BLE (R4)
    • 1993-2000s: B10L/B10LA (R5)
    • 1997-2006?: B7L/B7LA (R7)
    • 1998-2002: Säffle, Sweden (1981, known as Volvo Bussar Säffle AB from 2004, plant closed in 2013)
    • Leyland Bus, United Kingdom (1988, all Leyland products ceased production by July 1993)
    • Steyr Bus GmbH, Steyr, Austria (75% in 1990,[2] plant closed in the 1990s)
    • Aabenraa Karrosseri A/S, Aabenraa, Denmark (1994, plant closed in 2004)
    • Drögmöller Karosserien GmbH & Co. KG, Heilbronn, Germany (1994, later known as Volvo Busse Industries (Deutschland) GmbH, plant closed in 2005)
    • Prevost Coaches, Quebec, Canada (1995), now known as Prevost Car
    • Merkavim, Israel (1996), jointly owned by Volvo Bus Corporation & Mayer Cars & Trucks Ltd., importer of HONDA cars & bikes in Israel[3]
    • Volvo Polska Sp. z o.o., Wrocław, Poland (1996), the largest Volvo Buses factory in Europe
    • Carrus Oy, Finland (January 1998,[4] known as Volvo Bus Finland Oy from 2004)
      • Carrus Oy Delta, Lieto, known as Volvo Bus Finland Oy Turku Factory from 2004, became independent in 2008 and renamed Carrus Delta Oy
      • Carrus Oy Ajokki, Tampere, known as Volvo Bus Finland Oy Tampere Factory from 2004, plant closed in 2008
      • Carrus Oy Wiima, Vantaa, plant closed in 2001
    • Nova Bus, St-Eustache, Quebec, Canada (1998)
    • Mexicana de Autobuses SA (MASA), Tultitlán, Mexico (1998), renamed Volvo Buses de México[5]
    • Alfa Busz Kft, Székesfehérvár, Hungary, (2002)
    • EUROBUS, Zagreb, Croatia (1994.-1999.) on chassis B10, B12

    Production sites

    Gallery

  • Volvo B638 Bus 1953

  • Vo

    Volvo B727 Bus 1953

  • Volvo B70501 Bus 1959

  • Volvo B655 Bus 1963

    Volvo B655 Bus 1963

  • 1967 Volvo bus <

    1967 Volvo bus

  • A Van Hool-bodied Volvo B10M single-deck coach

  • Volvo B10MA, 1985

  • Alexander Strider bodywork, pictured as a training bus for First Greater Manchester

  • Volvo B9TL, 2013

  • Volvo B8RLE, 2013

  • Volvo B11R, 2018

  • References