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The Commitments
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The Commitments is the first book in Doyle's series known as The Barrytown Trilogy, followed by The Snapper (1990) and The Van (1991). While all three novels focus on the Rabbitte family, Doyle expressed that he was not interested in writing or producing sequels to the 1991 film adaptation, stating, "I hope it's never made. I just think that, whereas The Commitments was very much a labour of love, Commitments 2 is definitely an act of cynicism."[56]

Doyle was given creative freedom by the BBC over the adaptation of The Snapper, for which he wrote the screenplay.[56] Lynda Myles returned to produce the film and hired Stephen Frears as its director.[92] Colm Meaney returned in a supporting role. The adaptation was originally planned as a television film before Frears suggested that it be transferred to film. Doyle disagreed with the change, stating, "I didn't like it on the big screen—I thought it was grainy."[92] The Snapper (1993) premiered at the 1993 Cannes Film Festival, where it received a standing ovation.[92] It was a critical success, receiving largely positive reviews.[93]

For the film adaptation of The Van, Doyle and Myles formed their own production company, Deadly Films, and the author was given creative control over the selection of its cast and director.[94]<

Many of the actors went on to pursue various acting and musical careers.[18] Robert Arkins signed a record deal with MCA Records in 1993,[85] although he did not finish recording the consequent album.[86] He has produced work for a number of commercial clients, television projects, and composed music for two short films.[18] Andrew Strong went on to produce several albums, which he described as having elements of R&B and rock. He has performed alongside The Rolling Stones, Elton John and Ray Charles, and formed his own band, The Bone Yard Boys, in 2003.[87] In 1993, two of the film's cast members, Kenneth McCluskey and Dick Massey, formed their own tribute act band, The Stars from the Commitments. The 9-piece band has since played more than 1,000 shows worldwide, and has played with B.B. King, James Brown and Wilson Pickett.[18][88]

Siblings Andrea, Jim, Sharon and Caroline Corr, who had minor supporting roles, had only recently formed their family quartet, performing in their aunt's pub as The Corrs; the film's music coordinator, John Hughes, noticed them when they auditioned for the film and agreed to become their manager.[89] The band has since achieved international stardom, releasing six studio albums and selling more than 60 million records worldwide.[18] Andrea would again collaborate with Parker on his 1996 film adaptation of the musical Evita.[9][90] Glen Hansard continued performing with his band, The Frames, and achieved greater success and critical acclaim with the 2005 film Once.[18] Bronagh Gallagher has since enjoyed a lengthy acting career in film and television and Maria Doyle Kennedy has, to date, released eleven studio albums and has gone on to become an award-winning actress.[9] Michael Aherne is the only cast member to have not pursued an acting career after the film's release.[18]

On 6 October 2010, it was announced that Strong, Arkins, Ball, Gallagher, Aherne, Hansard, Félim Gormley and Dave Finnegan would join The Stars from The Commitments for a reunion tour to celebrate the film's 20th anniversary.[91] Donations from every ticket sold were given to the Irish Cancer Society, with a goal of raising 30,000.[91] The cast performed at The Royal Theatre, in Castlebar, County Mayo on 14 March 2011, Ireland's National Events Centre (INEC) in Killarney, County Kerry on 15 March 2011, The Odyssey, in Belfast on 17 March 2011, and The O2 in Dublin on 19 March 2011.[91]

The Commitments is the first book in Doyle's series known as The Barrytown Trilogy, followed by The Snapper (1990) and The Van (1991). While all three novels focus on the Rabbitte family, Doyle expressed that he was not interested in writing or producing sequels to the 1991 film adaptation, stating, "I hope it's never made. I just think that, whereas The Commitments was very much a labour of love, Commitments 2 is definitely an act of cynicism."[56]

Doyle was given creative freedom by the BBC over the adaptation of The Snapper, for which he wrote the screenplay.[56] Lynda Myles returned to produce the film and hired Stephen Frears as its director.[92] Colm Meaney returned in a supporting role. The adaptation was originally planned as a television film before Frears suggested that it be transferred to film. Doyle disagreed with the change, stating, "I didn't like it on the big screen—I thought it was grainy."[92] The Snapper (1993) premiered at the 1993 Cannes Film Festival, where it received a standing ovation.[92] It was a critical success, receiving largely

Doyle was given creative freedom by the BBC over the adaptation of The Snapper, for which he wrote the screenplay.[56] Lynda Myles returned to produce the film and hired Stephen Frears as its director.[92] Colm Meaney returned in a supporting role. The adaptation was originally planned as a television film before Frears suggested that it be transferred to film. Doyle disagreed with the change, stating, "I didn't like it on the big screen—I thought it was grainy."[92] The Snapper (1993) premiered at the 1993 Cannes Film Festival, where it received a standing ovation.[92] It was a critical success, receiving largely positive reviews.[93]

For the film adaptation of The Van, Doyle and Myles formed their own production company, Deadly Films, and the author was given creative control over the selection of its cast and director.[94] Frears returned as director, and Meaney was cast in the lead role. Although The Van (1996) premiered at the 1996 Cannes Film Festival to some favorable reviews, critical reaction was negative upon release; reviewers criticized the film for its thin material and lack of strong characterization.[95]

In January 2000, it was announced that Harvey Weinstein had acquired the film rights to the novel for Miramax[1] and commissioned playwright Warren Leight to write a direct sequel to The Commitments, with Cathy Konrad attached as a producer. The premise involved several members of The Commitments pairing with new band members before going on tour in the United States.[96] The sequel was never produced.[97]

Stage production

Doyle's novel inspired a 2013 musical stage production, directed by British theatre director Jamie Lloyd.[98][99] Following the film's success, Doyle had previously turned down offers to adapt his novel into a stage production.[84][100] The Commitments began previews on 21 September 2013 in London's West End at the Palace Theatre. Its official opening night was on 8 October 2013.[101] The show went on to perform more than 1,000 shows before officially closing in London on 1 November 2015. It has been announced that a United Kingdom and Ireland tour will commence in 2017.[102]

References

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