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Qazvin
Qazvin
(/kæzˈviːn/; Persian: قزوین‎, IPA: [ɢæzˈviːn] ( listen), also Romanized as Qazvīn, Caspin, Qazwin, or Ghazvin) is the largest city and capital of the Province of Qazvin
Qazvin
in Iran. Qazvin
Qazvin
was an ancient capital in the Safavid
Safavid
dynasty and nowadays is known as the calligraphy capital of Iran. It is famous for its Baghlava, carpet patterns, poets, political newspaper and pahlavi (Middle Persian) influence on its accent. At the 2011 census, its population was 381,598.[1] Located in 150 km (93 mi) northwest of Tehran, in the Qazvin Province, it is at an altitude of about 1,800 m (5,900 ft) above sea level. The climate is cold but dry, due to its position south of the rugged Alborz
Alborz
range called KTS Atabakiya.

Contents

1 History 2 People 3 Climate 4 Main sights 5 Economy

5.1 Colleges and universities 5.2 Modern towers 5.3 Shopping complexes 5.4 Bridges 5.5 Famous hotels 5.6 Major parks 5.7 Hypermarkets

6 Transportation 7 Sport 8 Notable Qazvinis

8.1 Pre-Modern time 8.2 Modern time 8.3 Notable people buried in Qazvin

9 Twin towns – sister cities 10 See also 11 References 12 External links

History[edit]

Shah Tahmasp
Shah Tahmasp
I (1524–1576) made Qazvin
Qazvin
the capital of the Safavid empire.

Peighambariyeh, burial place of four Jewish saints: Salam, Solum, al-Qiya, and Sohuli.

The city was a capital of the Persian Empire under Safavids in 1548–1598.[2] It is a provincial capital today that has been an important cultural center throughout history. Archeological findings in the Qazvin
Qazvin
plain reveal urban agricultural settlements for at least nine millennia. Qazvin
Qazvin
geographically connects Tehran, Isfahan, and the Persian Gulf
Persian Gulf
to the Caspian seacoast and Asia Minor, hence its strategic location throughout the ages. The city today known as Qazvin
Qazvin
is thought to have been founded by Shapur II, King of Persia in 250 CE, under the name Shad Shahpur (shad can be read as 'happy'), when he built a fortification there to control regional tensions. Qazvin
Qazvin
has sometimes been of central importance at major moments of Iranian history. It was captured by invading Arabs (644 AD) and destroyed by Hulagu Khan
Hulagu Khan
(13th century). After the Ottoman capture of Tabriz, Shah Tahmasp
Shah Tahmasp
(1524–1576) made Qazvin
Qazvin
the capital of the Safavid
Safavid
empire (founded in 1501 AD), a status that Qazvin
Qazvin
retained for half a century until Shah Abbas I
Shah Abbas I
moved the capital to Isfahan.[2] In 1210 the city was damaged by the forces of Kingdom of Georgia
Kingdom of Georgia
sent by Tamar the Great, as per the retribution for destroying Georgian-controlled Ani
Ani
by the Muslim forces that left 12,000 Christians dead.[3][4] In the 19th century Qazin flourished as a center of trade because the only all-year accessible road from the Caspian Sea to the Highland started here and with enhanced traffic on the Caspian Sea the trade volume grew. Its bazaars were enlarged.[5] In the middle of the century the Babi movement had one of its centers here and the first massacre of Babis occurred in Qazvin
Qazvin
in 1847.[6]

Salaam'Gaah Street in Qazvin
Qazvin
city (Photo credits goes to MKR)

In the second half of the 19th century Qazvin
Qazvin
was one of the centers of Russian presence in northern Iran. A detachment of the Persian Cossack Brigade under Russian officers was stationed here. From 1893 this was the headquarters of the Russian Company for Road construction in Persia which connected Qazvin
Qazvin
by roads to Tehran
Tehran
and Hamadan. The company built a hospital and the St. Nicolas Church. In 1920 Qazvin
Qazvin
was used as a base for the British Norperforce.[7] The 1921 Persian coup d'état
1921 Persian coup d'état
that led to the rise of the Pahlavi dynasty was launched from Qazvin. Qazvin
Qazvin
has been one of the main pivots on which Persia’s history has revolved and this is where its reputation as an impenetrable fortress originates. During the fall of the Safavids, Qazvin
Qazvin
was the centre of Persians reunion for the liberation of Persian territories invaded by Ottoman, Russian, and Afghan forces in the west, north, and east, respectively. The deployed swordsmen from Qazvin
Qazvin
not only retrieved Safavid
Safavid
boundaries, but also contributed to their expansion up to China (east), after occupying India by Nader Shah
Nader Shah
The Great, Daghestan (north) and Baghdad
Baghdad
(west). Similarly, Qazvin
Qazvin
hosted the base of Assassins
Assassins
and was the training centre of the Nehzat-e Jangal (The Jungle Movement) revolutionaries. Qazvin
Qazvin
became a state in 1996. In Autumn 2015 portions of Qazvin
Qazvin
were struck by a meteorite.[8] People[edit] The majority of the people of the city of Qazvin
Qazvin
are Persians. The majority language is Persian with a Qazvini accent.[9] Azerbaijanis and Tats Persians are the other largest ethnic groups of the city of Qazvin.[10] They speak Azerbaijani and Tati.[11] Qazvin
Qazvin
is a multicultural city and has hosted Armenian, Romanian, Georgian and Kurdish minorities which have fled to Qazvin
Qazvin
mainly for saving their lives from Ottomans invaders. Climate[edit]

Climate data for Qazvin

Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year

Average high °C (°F) 5.1 (41.2) 7.6 (45.7) 13.7 (56.7) 20.0 (68) 25.9 (78.6) 32.2 (90) 35.6 (96.1) 34.6 (94.3) 30.9 (87.6) 23.1 (73.6) 15.4 (59.7) 8.1 (46.6) 21.0 (69.8)

Average low °C (°F) −4.7 (23.5) −2.9 (26.8) 1.7 (35.1) 6.4 (43.5) 10.6 (51.1) 14.6 (58.3) 17.7 (63.9) 16.9 (62.4) 12.9 (55.2) 7.8 (46) 2.9 (37.2) −1.9 (28.6) 6.8 (44.3)

Average precipitation mm (inches) 44.5 (1.752) 40.8 (1.606) 52.1 (2.051) 41.0 (1.614) 34.5 (1.358) 5.9 (0.232) 1.2 (0.047) 1.9 (0.075) 0.8 (0.031) 21.7 (0.854) 27.8 (1.094) 44.0 (1.732) 316.2 (12.446)

Average precipitation days 10.5 10.1 13.3 13.3 12.7 4.5 2.4 2.3 2.0 7.7 7.9 9.7 96.4

Source: World Meteorological Organisation

Main sights[edit] Qazvin
Qazvin
contains several archeological excavations. In the middle of the city lie the ruins of Meimoon Ghal'eh, one of several Sassanid edifices in the area.[citation needed] Qazvin
Qazvin
contains several buildings from the Safavid
Safavid
era, dating to the period in which it was capital of Persia. Perhaps the most famous of the surviving edifices is the Chehel sotoun, Qazvin, today a museum in central Qazvin.

Entrance of Masjed al-Nabi, Qazvin, Iran.

After Islam, the popularity of mystics (tasawwuf), as well as the prominence of tradition (Hadith), religious jurisprudence (fiqh), and philosophy in Qazvin, led to the emergence of many mosques and religious schools. They include:

Jame' Atiq Mosque
Mosque
of Qazvin Heydarieh mosque Masjed Al-nabi (Soltani Mosque): With an area of 14000 m2, this mosque is one of the most glorious mosques of antiquity, built in the Safavieh's monarchy era. Sanjideh Mosque: Another mosque of Qazvin
Qazvin
dating back to pre-Islamic Iran; a former fire temple. Its present-day form is attributed to the Seljukian era. Panjeh Ali Mosque: A former place of worship for royal harem members in the Safavid
Safavid
period. Peighambarieh School-Mosque: Founded 1644 according to inscription. Peighambarieh Shrine: Where four Jewish saints who foretold the coming of Christ, are buried.[12][13][14] Molla Verdikhani School-Mosque: Founded in 1648. Salehieh Madrasa and Mosque: Founded in 1817 by Mulla Muhammad Salih Baraghani. Sheikhol Islam School-Mosque: Renovated in 1903. Eltefatieh School: Dating back to the Il-Khanid period. Sardar School- Mosque: Made by two brothers Hossein Khan and Hassan Khan Sardar in 1815, as a fulfillment of their promise if they came back victorious from a battle against the Russians. Shazdeh Hosein Shrine (location: 36°15′26″N 50°00′02″E / 36.257253°N 50.000678°E / 36.257253; 50.000678); a c.15C CE shrine to a c.9C CE Shiite saint. Aminiha Hosseiniyeh

The Qajar-era Caravanserai
Caravanserai
of Sa'd al-Saltaneh.

The Russian Church of Qazvin
Qazvin
today sits adjacent to the campus of Islamic Azad University of Qazvin.

Chehel sotoun.

About 100 km (62 mi) south-west of Qazvin
Qazvin
are the tombs of two Saljuki era princes — Abu Saeed Bijar, son of Sa'd, and Abu Mansur Iltai, son of Takin — located in two separate towers known as the Kharraqan twin towers. Constructed in 1067 CE, these were the first monuments in Islamic architecture
Islamic architecture
to include a non-conic two-layered dome. Both towers were severely damaged by a devastating earthquake in March 2003. Sepah Street (خیابان سپه , pronounced "Cepah" referring to ancient Persian army and not the revolutionary guards pronounced "Sipaahe") is known as the first modern street in Iran. This street entirely is carpeted with carved gray stone and is surrounded by craftsmen gift shops (used to be bars or bygone liquorshops, called May'kadeh) and hosts historical places such as Qazvin's Ali Qapu gate, entrance of Jame' Atiq mosque and historical schools. Qazvin
Qazvin
has three buildings built by Russians in the late 19th/early 20th century. Among these is the current Mayor's office (former Ballet Hall) and a water reservoir. St. Nicholas church was built in 1904 by the Russian Company for Roads in Persia which had its headquarter here. The church was in use until being decommissioned in 1984 because the community of Russian emigres in Qazvin
Qazvin
did not exist any more. The iconostasis and bell was removed to Tehran
Tehran
and the building handed over to the Iranian government which keeps it available to the public as a historic monument. In front of the church is a 1906 memorial to a Russian road engineer.[15] Economy[edit]

A memorial of the many Qazvinis who died during the revolution of Iran and during the Iran–Iraq War.

Qazvin
Qazvin
today is a center of textile trade, including cotton, silk and velvet, in addition to leather. It is on the railroad line and the highway between Tehran
Tehran
and Tabriz. Qazvin
Qazvin
has one of the largest power plants feeding electricity into Iran's national power grid, the Shahid Raja'i facility, which provides 7% of Iran's electrical power. Colleges and universities[edit] Qazvin
Qazvin
has several institutes of higher education:

Imam Khomeini International University Islamic Azad University of Qazvin[16] Payam-e-Nur University of Qazvin Qazvin
Qazvin
University of Medical Sciences Raja University[17] Shahid Babaee Technical Institute[18] Kar University[19] University of Qazvin

Modern towers[edit] Some famous residential towers are: Punak (536 units), Aseman, Elahieh, Bademestan (440 units in 17 floors) and Tejarat tower with 28 floors. Shopping complexes[edit]

City Star in Khayam Street Ferdowsi in Ferdowsi Street Iranian in Adl Street Narvan in Ferdowsi Street Noor in Felestin Street meh ro mah bouali Street

Bridges[edit]

Naderi Molasadra Ertebatat Persian Gulf
Persian Gulf
(Khalij Fars) Abotorabi Nasr Motahari Imam Ali Rajaei

Famous hotels[edit]

Alborz safir mir emad Iranian behrouzi historical house Iran Marmar Razhia Ghods(closed) Grand Hotel, Qazvin Noizar

Major parks[edit]

Shohada Dehkhoda Beheshti Fadak (Barajin) Mellat Al-Ghadir Afarinesh molla khalila

Hypermarkets[edit]

Proma Hypermarket (closed) HyperKeper is new Brand . Refah Chain Stores Co

noor shopping mall hyper market * easy to access near city center walmart costco

Transportation[edit]

Qazvin
Qazvin
railway station. Qazvin
Qazvin
Airport. Qazvin
Qazvin
Bus terminal

Sport[edit] Qazvin
Qazvin
is a well-known city because of its famous athletes. The city has highly focused on athletic teams along recent years. Techmash is a basketball team which entered Iranian Basketball Super League
Iranian Basketball Super League
in 2013. Notable Qazvinis[edit]

Qazvin
Qazvin
is an ancient city containing fine examples of Iranian architecture from various ages. This is the Shazdeh Hosein Shrine.

There have been an abundance of known people who lived in Qazvin, or came from Qazvin, whose tombs are scattered throughout the cities and villages of the province. These include: Pre-Modern time[edit]

Ibn Majah, author of the last of the six canonical hadith collections recognized by Sunni
Sunni
Muslims. Hamdollah Mostowfi: the great Il-Khanid historian and writer. Ubayd Zakani: famous 8th-century poet noted for his satire and obscene verses. Mir Emad Hassani: famous Nasta'liq
Nasta'liq
calligrapher Darvish Ablulmajid: famous Shekaste Nasta'liq
Nasta'liq
calligrapher

Modern time[edit]

Yousef Alikhani: contemporary fiction writer and researcher. Azizi family: a well-known family that originates from Qazvin
Qazvin
includes Sheikh Ahmad Azizi]], known research and medical doctor Dr. Sadegh Pirooz Azizi, the former Minister of Foreign Affairs from 1997–2005 Mr. Ahmad Azizi, hadi Azizi and Abolghasem Azizi. Ali Akbar Dehkhoda: prominent linguist and author of Iran's first modern Persian dictionary. Abdul Hossein Darki: known doctor. Jamal Karimi-Rad: former Minister of Justice (2005–2006). Hadi Mirmiran: architect. Shirin Neshat: Famous contemporary Iranian artist. Mojabi
Mojabi
family: a prominent family that originates from Qazvin including Javad Mojabi
Mojabi
and Zohreh Mojabi. Molla Khalil Ibn Ghazi Qazvini: famous faqih (religious jurist) and commentator of the Qur'an
Qur'an
in the Safavid
Safavid
period (d. 1678). Aref Qazvini: poet, lyricist, and musician. Ra'ees ol-Mojahedin: The late Mirza Hassan Sheikh al-Islam, son of Mirza Masoud Sheikh al-Islam, leader of the liberals and constitutionalists of Qazvin. Shahid Saless: killed in 1846. The third religious leader after Imam Ali who was murdered during prayer. Kázim-i-Samandar: a famous follower of Bahaullah. Monir Shahroudy Farmanfarmaian: Famous contemporary Iranian artist. Táhirih: influential poet and theologian of the Bábí Faith. Nasser Takmil Homayoun: a contemporary historian. Nasser Yeganeh: Chief Justice of the Supreme Court (1975–79). Haj seyed Javadi: politician in early 1980s. Abbas Babaei: Brigadier General in the Islamic Republic of Iran
Iran
Air Force

Notable people buried in Qazvin[edit]

Uwais Qarni: a celebrity of early Islam, thought to have been killed here while fighting against an army of Deilamian origin.[citation needed] Ahmad Ghazali: famous Iranian sufi who died in 1126 CE and was buried beside Shahzadeh Hossein. Ali Ibn Shazan: great scholar of the fifth century. Shahzadeh Hossein: Shiite saint.

Twin towns – sister cities[edit]

Shah Alam, Malaysia
Malaysia
(Oct. 2011) Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan
Kyrgyzstan
(2011) Chuvash Republic, Russia
Russia
(2012) Gaziantep, Turkey
Turkey
(2012) Denizli, Turkey
Turkey
(2012) Évora, Portugal
Portugal
(Jan. 2014) Baalbek, Lebanon
Lebanon
(Oct. 2015) Yerevan, Armenia(2015) Suwon, South Korea
South Korea
(2016) Osan, South Korea
South Korea
(2016) Perugia, Italy
Italy
(Sep. 2016)

See also[edit]

Mesjed Koucheek, Qazvin, in 1921. Today this building is referred to as Shazdeh Hosein Shrine.

Caspians List of famous ab anbars of Qazvin Qazwini (other), a personal name meaning "from Qazwin"

References[edit]

^ Qazvin
Qazvin
/ قزوين (Iran): Province & Cities – Population Statistics in Maps and Charts ^ a b Iran
Iran
(5th ed., 2008), by Andrew Burke and Mark Elliott, p. 28 Archived June 7, 2011, at the Wayback Machine., Lonely Planet Publications, ISBN 978-1-74104-293-1 ^ Mikaberidze, Alexander (2011). Conflict and Conquest in the Islamic World: A Historical Encyclopedia, Volume 1. Santa Barbara, California, USA: ABC-CLIO. p. 196. ISBN 1598843362.  ^ L. Baker, Patricia; Smith, Hilary; Oleynik, Maria (2014). Iran. London, United Kingdom: Bradt Travel Guides. p. 158. ISBN 1841624020.  ^ "Qazvin" in Historic Cities of the Islamic World, p. 435 ^ Baha'i History of Qazvin ^ Haldane, J. Aylmer L. Sir (2005), The insurrection in Mesopotamia, 1920, London: The Imperial War Museum in association with The Battery Press, ISBN 1904897169, OCLC 60688896, 1904897169  ^ Large meteorite impacts Iran
Iran
causing serious damage to Qazvin, numerous towns affected ^ The official Media from Qazvin- February 10-2010 Archived November 2, 2013, at the Wayback Machine. ^ Tats of Iran
Iran
and Caucasus, Ali Abdoli, 2010. ^ Qazvin ^ Arash Nooraghayee ^ iranian.com: Nima Kasraie, Qazvin
Qazvin
water reservoirs ^ Peighambarieh Mausoleum in Qazvin: Burial place of Israeli prophets ^ РУССКАЯ ПРАВОСЛАВНАЯ ЦЕРКОВЬ В ПЕРСИИ – ИРАНЕ (1597–2001 гг.) Игумен Александр (Заркешев) Санкт-Петербург 2002 – Russian Orthodox Church in Persia- Iran
Iran
1597–2001, by abbot Alexander Zarkeshev, St Peterburg 2002, pp 70f and 110 Archived December 10, 2014, at the Wayback Machine.; the church is sometimes referred to as "Kantur" church from the name of the area where it stands ^ qiau.ac.ir ^ Raja University ^ afshbq.ac.ir Archived December 12, 2004, at the Wayback Machine. ^ kar.ac.ir

External links[edit]

Wikivoyage has a travel guide for Qazvin.

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Qazvin.

Satellite Picture by Google Maps FallingRain Map – elevation = 1285 m (Red dots are railways) towers profile How to go to Qazvin
Qazvin
from Tehran? (Bus, Taxi or Train)

Preceded by Tabriz Capital of Iran
Iran
(Persia) 1555–1598 Succeeded by Isfahan

Preceded by Tabriz Capital of Safavid
Safavid
dynasty 1555–1598 Succeeded by Isfahan

v t e

Qazvin
Qazvin
Province

Capital

Qazvin

Counties and cities

Abyek
Abyek
County

Abyek Khak-e Ali

Alborz
Alborz
County

Alvand Bidestan Mohammadiyeh Sharifabad

Avaj

Avaj Abgarm

Buin Zahra
Buin Zahra
County

Buin Zahra Ardak Danesfahan Sagezabad Shal

Qazvin
Qazvin
County

Qazvin Eqbaliyeh Kuhin Mahmudabad Nemuneh Moallem Kalayeh Razmian Sirdan

Takestan
Takestan
County

Takestan Esfarvarin Khorramdasht Narjeh Ziaabad

Sights

Alamut Castle Aminiha Hosseiniyeh Caravanserai
Caravanserai
of Sa'd al-Saltaneh Meimoon Ghal'eh Ahmadabad-e Mosaddeq Ab anbars of Qazvin Jame' Atiq Mosque
Mosque
of Qazvin Heidarieh mosque Al-Nabi mosque Ovan Lake Kharraqan towers Lambsar Castle Shazdeh Hosein shrine

populated places

List of cities, towns and villages in Qazvin
Qazvin
Province

v t e

Qazvin
Qazvin
County

Capital

Qazvin

Districts

Central

Cities

Qazvin Eqbaliyeh Mahmudabad Nemuneh

Rural Districts and villages

Eqbal-e Gharbi (West Eqbal)

Ajor Band Ak Akbarabad Alulak Amirabad-e Eqbal Ardabilak Bademjin Band-e Zuyar Barajin Buzelin Charis Chubin Dar Emamzamen Esmailabad Farsian Gholamabad Gorkin Hadiabad Hemmatabad Hoseynabad-e Eqbal Jannatabad Kakajin Keshabad-e Olya Keshabad-e Sofla Kharman Sukhteh Kheyrabad Mahmudabad-e Alam Khani Mazraeh Esmailabad Mazraeh Katirayi Mazraeh Parseh Ay Mehdiabad-e Bozorg Meshkinabad Mizuj Najmabad Naserabad Nezamabad Niaq Orosabad Owzun Darreh Sefideh Kash Shafiabad Shafiabad Shah Qadam Shahrak-e Danesh Sheyd Esfahan Suteh Kosh Taratun Zakan Zereshk Zuyar

Eqbal-e Sharqi (East Eqbal)

Abdolabad Aranjak Ashnestan Dastjerd-e Olya Emamzadeh Abazar Hamidabad Hasanabad Kuraneh Mazraeh-ye Asharkar Mazraeh-ye Mian Chal Mianbar Najafabad Razjerd Reshtqun Shinqar Vosuqabad

Alamut-e Gharbi (West Alamut)

Cities

Razmian

Rural Districts and villages

Dastjerd

Alindar Arbedian Balakan Bazargah Changal Dasht Dastjerd-e Sofla Gashnerud Jir Duzan Kakuhestan Kalleh Kub Kangarin Kasha Rud Khosrud Lat Tahmursabad Taskin Tian Dasht Tuteh Chal

Rudbar-e Mohammad-e Zamani

Abbasak Aliabad Aminabad Avirak Azganin-e Olya Azganin-e Sofla Baghestan Darak Durchak Fanefin Garmak Halalabad Harif Hasanabad Horian Juyank Kalayeh Kalin Kalmin Kamalabad Karandeh Chal Katekan Khanjar Bolagh Lotar Markin Mohammadabad Moradabad Parachan Qostin Lar Qostin Rud Rajai Dasht Safarin Sefid Ab Simiyar Simiyar
Simiyar
Dasht Shotorak Sonbolabad Tanureh Voshteh Ya Rud Yuj Zinbar

Rudbar-e Shahrestan

Aku Jan Alin Angur Azuj Bahramabad Charsh Darreh Darband Deh Dushab Dur Chal Emamzadeh Harun Emamzadeh Mohammad Fallar Fashak Halarud Hasha Kalayeh Hir Jula Deh Kaman Kateh Posht Kia Kalayeh-ye Olya Kushk Dar Mazraeh-ye Rakanabad Milak Mushqin Parchkuh Por Rud Qostin Naheyeh Rahdarkhaneh Gadeyk Rashkin Ruhabad Salar Kia Sapuhin Shahrestan-e Olya Shahrestan-e Sofla Shangol Rud Sugah Talater Taq Darreh Vargil Vartavan Viar Zanasuj Zard Chal

Kuhin

Cities

Kuhin

Rural Districts and villages

Ilat-e Qaqazan-e Gharbi (West Ilat-e Qaqazan)

Alvandi Aq Duz Asadabad-e Khurin Asadi Asfastan Asiab Borg Astalak Astin Dar-e Olya Astin Dar-e Sofla Astin Dar-e Vosta Bahramabad-e Qaqazan Bak Kandi Bek Baghi Chenarlu Chubdar Chureh-ye Sofla Dudah Chay Dudaheh Gabri Gazaneh Hesamabad Jam Jerd Kharzan Mazraeh-ye Mahmudi Mumali Qeshlaq Naseri Nowruzabad Qanshar Bolagh Qazvin-Rasht Road Construction Company Qezel Darreh Selaqai Sukhteh Chenar Tazarkosh Yalabad Yaleh Gonbad

Ilat-e Qaqazan-e Sharqi (East Ilat-e Qaqazan)

Ahmadabad-e Owfan Amirabad Aqa Baba Arasht Bashar Buchinak-e Jadid Buinak Cheshmeh-ye Gholamali Dinak Dowdeh Taj Fetr Hajjiabad Hoseynabad Kakajin
Kakajin
Darreh Kharaqan-e Sofla Kikhanan Kordandeh Kushkak Mianej Moallem Khani-ye Bala Mortezaabad Narendeh Rameshan Sarbanak Senjanak Shenazand Soltanabad Yakond-e Aliabad Zitak Qeshlaq

Alamut-e Sharqi (East Alamut)

Cities

Moallem Kalayeh

Rural Districts and villages

Alamut-e Bala (Upper Alamut)

Aftab Dar Akbarabad Ameshk Andaj Aqagir Aveh Azadrud Bagh Kalayeh Baghdasht Beydli Bukan Chaleh Dehak Dek Dineh Kuh Fishan Jowladak Jutan Kandan Sar Khoshk Chal Kuchenan Mahmudabad Mardanchal Masudabad Minudasht Molla Kalayeh Sayen Kalayeh Shahrak Sharifabad Shirkuh Shurestan-e Olya Shurestan-e Sofla Soleymanabad Sorkh Kuleh Tavan Torkan Yerak Zardchin

Alamut-e Pain (Lower Alamut)

Alangan Atan Atan Rud Avanak Avatar Chu Sar Dineh Rud Garmarud Haranak Hasanabad Heniz Ilan Jirandeh Kafar Kosh Kalan Kalayeh Khuban Khubkuh Kushk Dasht Madan Nesa Normalat Pij Bon Ruch-e Darreh Ruch-e Olya Ruch-e Sofla Saraj Kalayeh Sefiddar Silikan Taleh Vanash-e Bala Vanash-e Pain Varak Varak Rud Vikan Yarafi Zavarak

Moallem Kalayeh

Ain Avan Azrat Dikin Garmarud-e Olya Garmarud-e Sofla Kushk Mazraeh-ye Olya Mazraeh-ye Sofla Mian Khani Sorkheh Dozak Varbon Zarabad Zavardasht

Tarom Sofla (Lower Tarom)

Cities

Sirdan

Rural Districts and villages

Chuqur

Abbasabad Aliabad Ardak Barvaj Chaman-e Amirabad Chizeh Dohneh Hesar Hoseynabad Mahin Moqanak Qarkhun Razan Saznaq Yamaqan Zarand

Khandan

Altin Kosh Amand Anbaqin Baghalduz-e Olya Chubeh Dizajin Duljak Khan-e Mohammadabad Gurkhaneh Hand-e Zamin Hasanabad Judaki Kallaj Kashkevar Meymunak Mir Khavand-e Olya Mir Khavand-e Sofla Mohammad Deh Morteza Nak Mostafalu Namakin Nasirabad Nehran Orkan-e Kord Orkan-e Tork Palangeh Qarah Cham Qitul Qolalu Qushchi Sangan-e Olya Sangan-e Sofla Shahvaran Shizar Sholomeh Siah Push

Kuhgir

Asbak Bon Zohreh Hasan Khani Kuhgir-e Olya Kuhgir-e Sofla Molla Ali Qaleh Qarah Davalavi Rudbar Sheykhlar Somaq Tarazan-e Olya Tarazan-e Sofla Tuinan Yuzbashi Chay Zaj Kan-e Olya Zaj Kan-e Sofla Zarrinabad

Niyarak

Aqjeh Qeshlaq Behganeh Rud Burmanak Charbin Fileh Varin Gavanaj Ghoncheh Khoran Il Chupan Khakineh-ye Bala Khakineh-ye Pain Najafabad Niyarak Suroshan Vangin Zahabad

v t e

Iranian architecture

Styles

Parsian

Achaemenid pre-Parsian

Parthian

Khorasani Sasanian

Other

Azeri Isfahani Razi

Types

Bazaars Caravanserais Khaneqah Mosques Tekyeh

Elements

Ab anbar Andaruni Biruni Burj Chahartaq Dalan e Vorudi Gonbad Hashti Howz Imamzadeh Iwan Kariz Kucheh Panjdari Persian Garden (hayāt) Qanat Robats Sahn Shabestan Talar Windcatchers Yakhchal

Traditional cities

Amol Andijan Baku Bam Bukhara Ctesiphon Derbent Ganja Gur-e-Amir Hatra Herat Isfahan Kashan Khiva Khorramabad Mashhad Merv Nakhchivan Nishapur Persepolis Qazvin Qom Samarkand Shahrisabz Shiraz Susa Tabriz Takht-e Soleymān Tehran Yazd

Theory and analysis

Islamic architecture Traditional Persian residential architecture Traditional water sources of Persian antiquity

Lists

Architects of Iran Args, castles, and ghal'ehs List of ab anbars of Qazvin List of mosques List of ziyarat-gahs

Authority control

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