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Lascaux
Lascaux
(French: Grotte de Lascaux, " Lascaux
Lascaux
Cave"; English: /læsˈkoʊ/,[1] French: [lasko][2]) is the setting of a complex of caves near the village of Montignac, in the department of Dordogne in southwestern France. Over 600 parietal wall paintings cover the interior walls and ceilings of the cave. The paintings represent primarily large animals, typical local and contemporary fauna that correspond with the fossil record of the Upper Paleolithic
Upper Paleolithic
time. The drawings are the combined effort of many generations, and with continued debate, the paintings are estimated around 17,000 years BP.[3][4][5] Lascaux
Lascaux
was inducted into the UNESCO
UNESCO
World Heritage Sites list in 1979, as element of the Prehistoric Sites and Decorated Caves of the Vézère
Vézère
Valley.[6]

Contents

1 History since rediscovery

1.1 Ochroconis lascauxensis

2 Geographic setting 3 Images

3.1 Interpretation

4 Threats 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External links

History since rediscovery[edit]

Human
Human
timeline

view • discuss • edit

-10 — – -9 — – -8 — – -7 — – -6 — – -5 — – -4 — – -3 — – -2 — – -1 — – 0 —

Human-like apes

Nakalipithecus

Ouranopithecus

Sahelanthropus

Orrorin

Ardipithecus

Australopithecus

Homo
Homo
habilis

Homo
Homo
erectus

Neanderthal

Homo
Homo
sapiens

Earlier apes

LCA-Gorilla separation

Possibly bipedal

LCA-Chimpanzee separation

Earliest bipedal

Earliest stone tools

Earliest exit from Africa

Earliest fire use

Earliest in Europe

Earliest cooking

Earliest clothes

Modern speech

Modern humans

P l e i s t o c e n e

P l i o c e n e

M i o c e n e

H

o

m

i

n

i

d

s

Axis scale: million years Also see: Life timeline and Nature timeline

Modern entrance to the Lascaux
Lascaux
cave

On September 12, 1940, the entrance to the Lascaux
Lascaux
Cave
Cave
was discovered by 18-year-old Marcel Ravidat. Ravidat (died in 1995) returned to the scene with three friends, Jacques Marsal, Georges Agnel, and Simon Coencas, and entered the cave via a long shaft. The teenagers discovered that the cave walls were covered with depictions of animals.[7][8] Galleries that suggest continuity, context or simply represent a cavern were given names. Those include the Hall of the Bulls, the Passageway, the Shaft, the Nave, the Apse, and the Chamber of Felines. The cave complex was opened to the public on July 14, 1948.[9] By 1955, carbon dioxide, heat, humidity, and other contaminants produced by 1,200 visitors per day had visibly damaged the paintings. As air condition deteriorated fungi and lichen increasingly infested the walls. Consequently, the cave was closed to the public in 1963, the paintings were restored to their original state and a monitoring system on a daily basis was introduced. Lascaux
Lascaux
II, an exact copy of the Great Hall of the Bulls and the Painted Gallery opened in 1983 in the cave's vicinity, a compromise and attempt to present an impression of the paintings' scale and composition for the public without harming the originals.[8] A full range of Lascaux's parietal art is presented a few kilometres from the site at the Centre of Prehistoric Art, Le Parc du Thot, where there are also live animals representing ice-age fauna.[10] Ochroconis lascauxensis[edit] Ochroconis lascauxensis is a species of fungus of the Ascomycota phylum, in May 2012 officially described and named after the locality of its first emergence, the Lascaux
Lascaux
cave. It was along with a closely related second species Ochroconis anomala, first observed in 2000 inside the cave and the following year black spots appeared among the cave paintings. No official announcement on the effect and/or progress of attempted treatments has ever been made.[11] As of 2008, the cave contained black mold. In January 2008, authorities closed the cave for three months, even to scientists and preservationists. A single individual was allowed to enter the cave for 20 minutes once a week to monitor climatic conditions. Now only a few scientific experts are allowed to work inside the cave and just for a few days a month but the efforts to remove the mold have taken a toll, leaving dark patches and damaging the pigments on the walls.[12] In 2009 it was announced: Mould problem "stable". In 2011 the fungus seemed to be in retreat after the installment of an additional, even stricter conservation program.[13] Geographic setting[edit]

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reproduction of Lascaux
Lascaux
artwork in Lascaux
Lascaux
II

In its sedimentary composition, the Vézère
Vézère
drainage basin covers one fourth of the département of the Dordogne, the northernmost region of the Black Périgord. Before joining the Dordogne
Dordogne
River near Limeuil, the Vézère
Vézère
flows in a south-westerly direction. At its centre point, the river's course is marked by a series of meanders flanked by high limestone cliffs that determine the landscape. Upstream from this steep-sloped relief, near Montignac and in the vicinity of Lascaux, the contours of the land soften considerably; the valley floor widens, and the banks of the river lose their steepness. The Lascaux
Lascaux
valley is located some distance from the major concentrations of decorated caves and inhabited sites, most of which were discovered further downstream. In the environs of the village of Eyzies-de-Tayac Sireuil, there are no less than 37 decorated caves and shelters, as well as an even greater number of habitation sites from the Upper Paleolithic, located in the open, beneath a sheltering overhang, or at the entrance to one of the area's karst cavities. This is the highest concentration in western Europe. Images[edit]

Megaloceros
Megaloceros
with line of dots

The cave contains nearly 6,000 figures, which can be grouped into three main categories: animals, human figures, and abstract signs. The paintings contain no images of the surrounding landscape or the vegetation of the time.[14] Most of the major images have been painted onto the walls using red, yellow, and black colours from a complex multiplicity of mineral pigments[15]:110[16] including iron compounds such as iron oxide (ochre),[17]:204 hematite, and goethite,[16][18] as well as manganese-containing pigments.[16][17]:208 Charcoal may also have been used[17]:199 but seemingly to a sparing extent.[15] On some of the cave walls, the colour may have been applied as a suspension of pigment in either animal fat or calcium-rich cave groundwater or clay, making paint,[15] that was swabbed or blotted on, rather than applied by brush.[18] In other areas, the colour was applied by spraying the pigments by blowing the mixture through a tube.[18] Where the rock surface is softer, some designs have been incised into the stone. Many images are too faint to discern, and others have deteriorated entirely. Over 900 can be identified as animals, and 605 of these have been precisely identified. Out of these images, there are 364 paintings of equines as well as 90 paintings of stags. Also represented are cattle and bison, each representing 4 to 5% of the images. A smattering of other images include seven felines, a bird, a bear, a rhinoceros, and a human. There are no images of reindeer, even though that was the principal source of food for the artists.[19] Geometric images have also been found on the walls. The most famous section of the cave is The Hall of the Bulls where bulls, equines, and stags are depicted. The four black bulls, or aurochs, are the dominant figures among the 36 animals represented here. One of the bulls is 5.2 metres (17 ft) long, the largest animal discovered so far in cave art. Additionally, the bulls appear to be in motion.[19] A painting referred to as "The Crossed Bison", found in the chamber called the Nave, is often submitted as an example of the skill of the Paleolithic cave painters. The crossed hind legs create the illusion that one bison is closer to the viewer than the other. This visual depth in the scene demonstrates a primitive form of perspective which was particularly advanced for the time. Interpretation[edit] Some anthropologists and art historians theorize that the paintings could be an account of past hunting success, or could represent a mystical ritual in order to improve future hunting endeavors. The latter theory is supported by the overlapping images of one group of animals in the same cave location as another group of animals, suggesting that one area of the cave was more successful for predicting a plentiful hunting excursion.[citation needed] Applying the iconographic method of analysis to the Lascaux
Lascaux
paintings (studying position, direction and size of the figures; organization of the composition; painting technique; distribution of the color planes; research of the image center), Thérèse Guiot-Houdart attempted to comprehend the symbolic function of the animals, to identify the theme of each image and finally to reconstitute the canvas of the myth illustrated on the rock walls.[20][further explanation needed]

Cave painting
Cave painting
of a dun horse (equine) at Lascaux

Julien d'Huy and Jean-Loïc Le Quellec showed that certain angular or barbed signs of Lascaux
Lascaux
may be analysed as "weapon" or "wounds". These signs affect dangerous animals—big cats, aurochs and bison—more than others and may be explained by a fear of the animation of the image.[21] Another finding supports the hypothesis of half-alive images. At Lascaux, bison, aurochs and ibex are not represented side by side. Conversely, one can note a bison-horses-lions system and an aurochs-horses-deer-bears system, these animals being frequently associated.[22] Such a distribution may show the relationship between the species pictured and their environmental conditions. Aurochs
Aurochs
and bison fight one against the other, and horses and deer are very social with other animals. Bison and lions live in open plains areas; aurochs, deer and bears are associated with forests and marshes; ibex habitat is rocky areas, and horses are highly adaptive for all these areas. The Lascaux
Lascaux
paintings' disposition may be explained by a belief in the real life of the pictured species, wherein the artists tried to respect their real environmental conditions.[23] Less known is the image area called the Abside (Apse), a roundish, semi-spherical chamber similar to an apse in a Romanesque basilica. It is approximately 4.5 metres in diameter (about 5 yards) and covered on every wall surface (including the ceiling) with thousands of entangled, overlapping, engraved drawings.[24] The ceiling of the Apse, which ranges from 1.6 to 2.7 metres high (about 5.2 to 8.9 feet) as measured from the original floor height, is so completely decorated with such engravings that it indicates that the prehistoric people who executed them first constructed a scaffold to do so.[14][25]

The famous shaft scene of Lascaux: a man with a bird head and a bison.

According to David Lewis-Williams
David Lewis-Williams
and Jean Clottes
Jean Clottes
who both studied presumably similar art of the San people
San people
of Southern Africa, this type of art is spiritual in nature relating to visions experienced during ritualistic trance-dancing. These trance visions are a function of the human brain and so are independent of geographical location.[26] Nigel Spivey, a professor of classical art and archeology at the University of Cambridge, has further postulated in his series, How Art Made the World, that dot and lattice patterns overlapping the representational images of animals are very similar to hallucinations provoked by sensory-deprivation. He further postulates that the connections between culturally important animals and these hallucinations led to the invention of image-making, or the art of drawing.[27] Threats[edit]

The conservation room at Lascaux

The opening of Lascaux
Lascaux
Cave
Cave
after World War II changed the cave environment. The exhalations of 1,200 visitors per day, presence of light, and changes in air circulation have created a number of problems. Lichens and crystals began to appear on the walls in the late 1950s, leading to closure of the caves in 1963. This led to restriction of access to the real caves to a few visitors every week, and the creation of a replica cave for visitors to Lascaux. In 2001, the authorities in charge of Lascaux
Lascaux
changed the air conditioning system which resulted in regulation of the temperature and humidity. When the system had been established, an infestation of Fusarium solani, a white mold, began spreading rapidly across the cave ceiling and walls.[28] The mold is considered to have been present in the cave soil and exposed by the work of tradesmen, leading to the spread of the fungus which was treated with quicklime. In 2007, a new fungus, which has created grey and black blemishes, began spreading in the real cave. Organized through the initiative of the French Ministry of Culture, an international symposium titled " Lascaux
Lascaux
and Preservation Issues in Subterranean Environments" was held in Paris on February 26 and 27, 2009, under the chairmanship of Jean Clottes. It brought together nearly three hundred participants from seventeen countries with the goal of confronting research and interventions conducted in Lascaux Cave
Cave
since 2001 with the experiences gained in other countries in the domain of preservation in subterranean environments.[29] The proceedings of this symposium were published in 2011. Seventy-four specialists in fields as varied as biology, biochemistry, botany, hydrology, climatology, geology, fluid mechanics, archaeology, anthropology, restoration and conservation, from numerous countries (France, United States, Portugal, Spain, Japan, and others) contributed to this publication.[30] The problem is ongoing, as are efforts to control the microbial and fungal growths in the cave. The fungal infection crises have led to the establishment of an International Scientific Committee for Lascaux and to rethinking how, and how much, human access should be permitted in caves containing prehistoric art.[31] See also[edit]

Art of the Upper Paleolithic Cave
Cave
of Altamira Cave
Cave
painting List of archaeological sites by country List of caves List of Stone Age
Stone Age
art Prehistoric art

References[edit]

^ "American English Dictionary: Definition of Lascaux". Collins. Retrieved 18 August 2013.  ^ "English Dictionary: Definition of Lascaux". Collins. Retrieved 18 August 2013.  ^ " Lascaux
Lascaux
Cave
Cave
Paintings: Layout, Meaning, Photographs - Dating - Chronological questions about the age of Lascaux's cave paintings, over what period they were created, and the identity of the oldest art in the complex, are still being debated..." Visual arts cork com. Retrieved December 28, 2016.  ^ "Ice Age star map discovered - thought to date back 16,500 years". BBC. August 9, 2000. Retrieved December 27, 2016.  ^ "Lascaux, France. These paintings are estimated to be around 17,300 years old". Ancient-wisdom. Retrieved December 27, 2016.  ^ "Prehistoric Sites and Decorated Caves of the Vézère
Vézère
Valley". UNESCO
UNESCO
World Heritage Center. Retrieved 30 December 2012.  ^ Thomas Jr., Robert McG. (March 31, 1995). "Marcel Ravidat is Dead at 72; Found Lascaux
Lascaux
Paintings". The New York Times. Retrieved 30 December 2012.  ^ a b Bahn, Paul G. (2007). Cave
Cave
Art: A Guide to the Decorated Ice Age Caves of Europe. London: Frances Lincoln. pp. 81–85. ISBN 0711226555.  ^ Littlewood, Ian (2005). Justin Wintle, ed. The timeline history of France. New York: Barnes & Noble. p. 296. ISBN 0760779759.  ^ le retour des loups “préhistoriques” ^ Martin-Sanchez, Pedro Maria; Nováková, Alena; Bastian, Fabiola; Alabouvette, Claude; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo (2012). "Two new species of the genus Ochroconis, O. lascauxensis and O. anomala isolated from black stains in Lascaux
Lascaux
Cave, France". Fungal Biology. Elsevier. 116 (5): 574–89. doi:10.1016/j.funbio.2012.02.006. PMID 22559918.  ^ Moore, Molly (July 1, 2008). "Debate Over Moldy Cave
Cave
Art Is a Tale of Human
Human
Missteps". The Washington Post. Retrieved 30 December 2012.  ^ "Lascaux's 18,000 year-old cave art under threat". Phys.org. Retrieved December 28, 2016.  ^ a b Nechvatal, Joseph (2011). Immersion Into Noise. Ann Arbor: Open Humanities Press. pp. 74–76. ISBN 978-1-60785-241-4. Retrieved 30 December 2012.  ^ a b c Dickson, D. Bruce (1992). The Dawn of Belief: Religion in the Upper Paleolithic
Upper Paleolithic
of Southwestern Europe. ISBN 9780816513369.  ^ a b c Chalmin E, Farges F, Vignaud C, et al. Discovery of Unusual Minerals in Paleolithic Black Pigments from Lascaux
Lascaux
(France) and Ekain (Spain). [1] ^ a b c Rapp, George R. (2013). Archaeomineralogy. ISBN 9783662050057.  ^ a b c " Lascaux
Lascaux
Cave
Cave
Paintings: Layout, Meaning, Photographs". visual-arts-cork.com.  ^ a b Curtis, Gregory (2006). The Cave
Cave
Painters: Probing the Mysteries of the World's First Artists (1st ed.). New York: Alfred A. Knopf. pp. 96–97, 102. ISBN 1400043484.  ^ Guiot-Houdart, Thérèse (2004). Lascaux
Lascaux
et les mythes (in French). Périgueux: Pilote 24. ISBN 2-912347-39-4.  ^ Julien d'Huy et Jean-Loïc Le Quellec (2010). "Les animaux 'fléchés' à Lascaux: nouvelle proposition d’interprétation" Préhistoire du Sud-Ouest 18(2): 161-170 ^ Denis Tauxe (2007)."L’organisation symbolique du dispositif pariétal de la grotte de Lascaux", Préhistoire du Sud-Ouest, 15: 177-266 ^ Julien d'Huy (2011). "La distribution des animaux à Lascaux reflèterait leur distribution naturelle", Bulletin de la Société Historique et Archéologique du Périgord
Périgord
CXXXVIII, 493-502 ^ Leroi-Gourhan, André. The Art of Prehistoric Man in Western Europe. London: Thames and Hudson. 1968. p. 315 ^ Mario Ruspoli, The Cave
Cave
of Lascaux: The Final Photographic Record (New York: Abrams, 1983) pp. 146-47 ^ Harry Francis Mallgrave (26 June 2013). Architecture and Embodiment: The Implications of the New Sciences and Humanities for Design. Routledge. pp. 190–. ISBN 978-1-135-09424-9.  ^ Gray, S. W. (2014). [ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=5404&context=theses "The cartographic paradigm in contemporary Australian landscape painting"] Check url= value (help).  ^ Joëlle Dupont; Claire Jacquet; Bruno Dennetière; Sandrine Lacoste (2007). "Invasion of the French Paleolithic painted cave of Lascaux
Lascaux
by members of the Fusarium solani
Fusarium solani
species complex". Mycologia. 99 (4): 526–533. doi:10.3852/mycologia.99.4.526. PMID 18065003.  ^ At the Takamatsuzuka Tomb
Takamatsuzuka Tomb
in Japan, and Altamira in Spain, for example. ^ Coye, N. dir. (2011), Lascaux
Lascaux
et la conservation en milieu souterrain: actes du symposium international (Paris, 26-27 fév. 2009) = Lascaux
Lascaux
and Preservation Issues in Subterranean Environments: Proceedings of the International Symposium (Paris, February 26 and 27), Éditions de la Maison des sciences de l'homme, 360 p. In french and english. [2] ^ Simons, Marlise (9 December 2007). "Fungus Once Again Threatens French Cave
Cave
Paintings". World:Europe. New York Times. Retrieved 15 October 2010. 

Further reading[edit]

Dubowski, Mark (2010). Discovery in the Cave
Cave
(Children's early reader). New York, New York, USA: Random House. ISBN 0375858938  Curtis, Gregory (2006). The Cave
Cave
Painters: Probing the Mysteries of the World's First Artists. New York, New York, USA: Knopf. ISBN 1-4000-4348-4  Lewis-Williams, David (2004). The Mind in the Cave: Consciousness and the Origins of Art. Thames and Hudson. ISBN 0-500-28465-2  Bataille, Georges (2005). The Cradle of Humanity: Prehistoric Art and Culture. New York, New York: Zone Books. ISBN 1-890951-55-2  Joseph Nechvatal, Immersive Excess in the Apse
Apse
of Lascaux, Technonoetic Arts 3, no3. 2005 B.et G. Delluc (dir.), Le Livre du Jubilé de Lascaux
Lascaux
1940-1990, Société historique et archéologique du Périgord, supplément au tome CXVII, 1990, 155 p., ill. B. et G. Delluc, 2003 : Lascaux
Lascaux
retrouvé. Les recherches de l'abbé André Glory, Pilote 24 édition, 368 p., ill. B. et G. Delluc, 2006 : Discovering Lascaux, Sud Ouest, nouvelle édition entièrement revue et très augmentée, 80 p., ill. plans et coupe. B. et G. Delluc, 2008 : Dictionnaire de Lascaux, Sud Ouest, Bordeaux. Plus de 600 entrées et illustrations. Bibliographie (450 références). ISBN 978-2-87901-877-5. B. et G. Delluc, 2010 : Lascaux
Lascaux
et la guerre. Une galerie de portraits, Bull. de la Soc. historique et arch. du Périgord, CXXXVI, 2e livraison, 40 p., ill., bibliographie. A. Glory, 2008 : Les recherches à Lascaux
Lascaux
(1952-1963). Documents recueillis et présentés par B. et G. Delluc, XXXIXe suppl. à Gallia-Préhistoire, CNRS, Paris. Joseph Nechvatal, 2011: Immersion Into Noise, University of Michigan Library's Scholarly Publishing Office. Ann Arbor. Rigaud, Jean-Philippe (October 1988). "Art Treasures from the Ice Age: Lascaux
Lascaux
Cave". National Geographic. Vol. 174 no. 4. pp. 482–499. ISSN 0027-9358. OCLC 643483454. 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Lascaux.

The microbiology of Lascaux
Lascaux
Cave Lascaux
Lascaux
Cave
Cave
Official Lascaux
Lascaux
Web site, from the French Ministry of Culture Save Lascaux
Lascaux
Official website of the International Committee for the Preservation of Lascaux Lascaux
Lascaux
Cave
Cave
Art Symposium The Bradshaw Foundation Human
Human
Timeline (Interactive) – Smithsonian, National Museum of Natural History (August 2016). Discussion of paintings by Janina Ramirez and Alice Roberts: Art Detective Podcast, 08 Feb 2017

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Iraq
ed-Dubb

Laos

Tham An Mah Tam Pa Ling

Lebanon

Antelias Jeita Kaukaba Ksar Akil Ras Baalbek I Ras El Kelb Nachcharini

Malaysia

Niah

Mongolia

Khoit Tsenkher

Myanmar

Padah-Lin

Pakistan

Sanghao

Palestine

Shuqba

Philippines

Callao Kalanay Minori Lapuz Lapuz Tabon

Sri Lanka

Batadombalena Belilena Fa Hien Hunugalagala

Thailand

Spirit Tham Lod

Turkmenistan

Dzhebel

Turkey

Belbaşı Karain

Uzbekistan

Obi-Rakhmat Teshik-Tash

Vietnam

Con Moong Nguom

Africa

Algeria

Gueldaman

Botswana

Tsodilo

Cameroon

Shum Laka

DR Congo

Matupi

Egypt

Beasts Swimmers

Kenya

Enkapune Ya Muto Njoro River

Lesotho

Liphofung

Libya

Haua Fteah Uan Muhuggiag

Morocco

Hercules Ifri n'Amr or Moussa Ifri Oudadane Jebel Irhoud Kelif el Boroud Taforalt

Mozambique

Ngalue

Namibia

Apollo 11 The White Lady

Nigeria

Rop

Somalia

Dhambalin Laas Geel

South Africa

Cradle of Humankind, World Heritage Site Cooper's Drimolen Gladysvale Gondolin Haasgat Kromdraai Makapansgat Malapa Motsetsi Plovers Lake Rising Star Sterkfontein Swartkrans

Other caves Blombos Border Boomplaas Byneskranskop Cango Diepkloof Elands Bay Howieson's Poort Klasies River Melkhoutboom Nelson Bay Pinnacle Point Sibudu Wonderwerk

Tanzania

Kondoa Irangi Luxmanda Mumba

Uganda

Nyero

Zambia

Kalemba Mumbwa

North and South America

Argentina

Las Manos

Aruba

Quadiriki

Belize

Actun Tunichil Muknal Barton Creek Midnight Terror

Brazil

Maquiné Pedra Pintada Peruaçu Rei do Mato Toca da Tira Peia

Canada

Bluefish Charlie Lake

Chile

Fell Milodón

Colombia

El Abra Chiribiquete Piedras del Tunjo Sáchica Tequendama Tibitó

Cuba

Ambrosio Calero Centella Cura Patana Pluma Punta del Este

Curaçao

Hato

Dominican Republic

Pomier

Jamaica

Long Mile

Mexico

Chan Hol Coxcatlan Dzibilchaltún Las Flechas Frightful Guilá Naquitz Oxtotitlán Sac Actun

Peru

Chivateros Guitarrero Pikimachay Qillqatani Toquepala T'uqu T'uquyuq

Suriname

Werehpai

United States

Arnold Research Baker Bonfire Bull Thistle Burnet Cherry Creek Colorado Millennial Danger Daugherty's Durango Dust Dutchess Quarry Fort Rock Franktown Gatecliff Graham Hidden Hidden Valley Hogup Humboldt La Grange Last Supper Levi LoDaisKa Lovelock Mammoth Mantle's Marmes Martz Meadowcroft Modoc Mummy On Your Knees Paisley Pendejo Pictograph Rockhouse Cliffs Russell Sandia Shoup Sisyphus Stanfield-Worley Tainter Tomaquag Trail Creek Trinchera Ventana Wilson Butte

Oceania

Australia

Abrakurrie Acheron Ballawinne Beeton Shelter Beginner's Luck Blanche Bradshaws Bone Burrup Cave
Cave
Bay Cliefden Cloggs Devil's Lair Eagles Reach Fossil Gabarnmung Jenolan Koongine Koonalda Kutikina Mackintosh 90/1 Madjedbebe Mammoth Mannalargenna Mudgegonga Murrawijinie Murujuga Naracoorte New Guinea II Nunamira ORS 7 Tarragal Ubirr Wargata Mina Warratyi Warreen Wellington

Guam

Gadao's Mahlac Talagi

Hawaii

Makauwahi

New Caledonia

Pindai

New Zealand

Moncks Ruakuri

Northern Mariana Islands

Chugai'

Papua New Guinea

Kilu

Samoa

Falemauga

Tuvalu

Nanumanga

Cave List of caves Cave
Cave
painting Speleology

v t e

Prehistoric technology

Prehistory

timeline outline Stone Age subdivisions New Stone Age

Technology

history

Tools

Farming

Neolithic
Neolithic
Revolution

founder crops New World crops

Ard / plough Celt Digging stick Domestication Goad Irrigation Secondary products Sickle Terracing

Food processing

Fire Basket Cooking

Earth oven

Granaries Grinding slab Ground stone Hearth

Aşıklı Höyük Qesem Cave

Manos Metate Mortar and pestle Pottery Quern-stone Storage pit

Hunting

Arrow Boomerang

throwing stick

Bow and arrow

history

Nets Spear

Spear-thrower baton harpoon woomera Schöningen Spears

Projectile points

Arrowhead Bare Island Cascade Clovis Cresswell Cumberland Eden Folsom Lamoka Manis Site Plano Transverse arrowhead

Systems

Game drive system

Buffalo jump

Toolmaking

Earliest toolmaking

Oldowan Acheulean Mousterian

Clovis culture Cupstone Fire hardening Gravettian
Gravettian
culture Hafting Hand axe

Grooves

Langdale axe industry Levallois technique Lithic core Lithic reduction

analysis debitage flake

Lithic technology Magdalenian
Magdalenian
culture Metallurgy Microblade technology Mining Prepared-core technique Solutrean
Solutrean
industry Striking platform Tool stone Uniface Yubetsu technique

Other tools

Adze Awl

bone

Axe Bannerstone Blade

prismatic

Bone tool Bow drill Burin Canoe

Oar Pesse canoe

Chopper

tool

Cleaver Denticulate tool Fire plough Fire-saw Hammerstone Knife Microlith Quern-stone Racloir Rope Scraper

side

Stone tool Tally stick Weapons Wheel

illustration

Architecture

Ceremonial

Göbekli Tepe Kiva Standing stones

megalith row Stonehenge

Pyramid

Dwellings

Neolithic
Neolithic
architecture British megalith architecture Nordic megalith architecture Burdei Cave Cliff dwelling Dugout Hut

Quiggly hole

Jacal Longhouse Mud brick

Mehrgarh

Neolithic
Neolithic
long house Pit-house Pueblitos Pueblo Rock shelter

Blombos Cave Abri de la Madeleine Sibudu Cave

Stone roof Roundhouse Stilt house

Alp pile dwellings

Wattle and daub

Water management

Check dam Cistern Flush toilet Reservoir Water well

Other architecture

Archaeological features Broch Burnt mound

fulacht fiadh

Causewayed enclosure

Tor enclosure

Circular enclosure

Goseck

Cursus Henge

Thornborough

Oldest buildings Megalithic architectural elements Midden Timber circle Timber trackway

Sweet Track

Arts and culture

Material goods

Baskets Beadwork Beds Chalcolithic Clothing/textiles

timeline

Cosmetics Glue Hides

shoes Ötzi

Jewelry

amber use

Mirrors Pottery

Cardium Grooved ware Linear Jōmon Unstan ware

Sewing needle Weaving Wine

Winery wine press

PrehistArt

Art of the Upper Paleolithic Art of the Middle Paleolithic

Blombos Cave

List of Stone Age
Stone Age
art Bird stone Bradshaw rock paintings Cairn Carved Stone Balls Cave
Cave
paintings

painting pigment

Cup and ring mark Geoglyph Golden hats Guardian stones Megalithic art Petroform Petroglyph Petrosomatoglyph Pictogram Rock art

Stone carving

Sculpture Statue menhir Stone circle

list British Isles and Brittany

Venus figurines

Burial

Burial mounds

Bowl barrow Round barrow

Mound Builders
Mound Builders
culture

U.S. sites

Chamber tomb

Severn-Cotswold

Cist

Dartmoor kistvaens

Clava cairn Court tomb Cremation Dolmen

Great dolmen

Funeral pyre Gallery grave

transepted wedge-shaped

Grave goods Jar burial Long barrow

unchambered Grønsalen

Megalithic tomb Mummy Passage grave Rectangular dolmen Ring cairn Simple dolmen Stone box grave Tor cairn Tumulus Unchambered long cairn

Other cultural

Astronomy

sites lunar calendar

Behavioral modernity Origin of language

trepanning

Prehistoric medicine Evolutionary musicology

music archaeology

Prehistoric music

Alligator drum flutes Divje Babe
Divje Babe
flute gudi

Prehistoric numerals Origin of religion

Paleolithic religion Prehistoric religion Spiritual drug use

Prehistoric warfare Symbols

symbolism

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 260905473 GND: 4034608-0 BNF: cb119342678 (data) NDL: 00956069

Anthropology portal Evolutionary bi

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