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Jackie Trad MP at a rally in s

The Palaszczuk Government referred the issue to the Queensland Law Reform Commission and pledged to introduce its own bill to decriminalise abortion in the next term of parliament.[27] The Termination of Pregnancy Bill 2018 was introduced to the Queensland Parliament on 22 August 2018, and passed on 25 October the same year.

On November 12 2015, Trad introduced 3 government bills into the Legislative Assembly aimed at reforming the infrastructure and planning framework in Queensland, including what would become the Planning Act 2016.[28] The new Planning Act made several changes to planning rules in the state including introducing 'bounded' code assessment that ensures proposed developments are more strictly assessed against the planning code, independent examination of proposed developments that may impact heritage buildings, a requirement for local government to publish reasons for development decisions for the first time, providing the ability for local governments to increase infrastructure charges to deliver community infrastructure, and affording residents and community groups the ability to appeal development decisions without adverse cost orders being awarded against them.[29][30][31][32]

Local Government electoral reform

On 1 December 2016, Trad introduced the Local Government Electoral (Transparency and Accountability in Local Government) and Other Legislation Amendment Bill into Queensland Parliament. The bill was passed into law on 10 May 2017, and amended a number of existing laws, most notably the Local Government Electoral Act 2011.[33]

The Crime and Corruption Commission’s December 2015 report regarding transparency and accountability in local government was noted as a major catal

On 1 December 2016, Trad introduced the Local Government Electoral (Transparency and Accountability in Local Government) and Other Legislation Amendment Bill into Queensland Parliament. The bill was passed into law on 10 May 2017, and amended a number of existing laws, most notably the Local Government Electoral Act 2011.[33]

The Crime and Corruption Commission’s December 2015 report regarding transparency and accountability in local government was noted as a major catalyst for the bill’s introduction.Crime and Corruption Commission’s December 2015 report regarding transparency and accountability in local government was noted as a major catalyst for the bill’s introduction.[34] A number of reforms to local government elections resulted, including ‘real-time’ political donation disclosures (in line with reforms to state elections introduced by the Palaszczuk Government), setting the candidate and third-party election disclosure donation threshold at $500 to align with a councillor’s register of interest gift disclosures threshold, and a requirement that all unspent campaign donations are either to be held for future campaign expenditure, returned to the relevant political party or transferred to a registered charity.[35]

On 12 December 2017, Trad was sworn in as Deputy Premier, Treasurer and Minister for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Partnerships in the Second Palaszczuk Ministry.[36]

First Budget

Trad delivered her first budget as Queensland Treasurer in June 2018, for the 2018–19 financial year. Official budget papers unveiled a $1.512 billion surplus in 2017–18 – more than three times the forecast in the Mid Year Fiscal and Economic Review in December 2017.[37] The 2018–19 budget also forecast operating surpluses for the next four years. The increase in forecast surpluses meant general government sector debt in 2017–18 was approximately $2.4 billion less than estimated in the 2017–18 budget. However, government debt was forecast to increase from a total of $70.8 billion in 2018/19 to $83 billion in 2021–22.[38]

The Budget included $50 million in 2018–19 as a capital grant to support the development of concentrated solar thermal projects to provide clean baseload

Trad delivered her first budget as Queensland Treasurer in June 2018, for the 2018–19 financial year. Official budget papers unveiled a $1.512 billion surplus in 2017–18 – more than three times the forecast in the Mid Year Fiscal and Economic Review in December 2017.[37] The 2018–19 budget also forecast operating surpluses for the next four years. The increase in forecast surpluses meant general government sector debt in 2017–18 was approximately $2.4 billion less than estimated in the 2017–18 budget. However, government debt was forecast to increase from a total of $70.8 billion in 2018/19 to $83 billion in 2021–22.[38]

The Budget included $50 million in 2018–19 as a capital grant to support the development of concentrated solar thermal projects to provide clean baseload power, and included additional funding over three years for solar and energy efficiency measures through the $97 million Advancing Clean Energy Schools prog

The Budget included $50 million in 2018–19 as a capital grant to support the development of concentrated solar thermal projects to provide clean baseload power, and included additional funding over three years for solar and energy efficiency measures through the $97 million Advancing Clean Energy Schools program.[39]

Trad introduced the Mineral and Energy Resources (Financial Provisioning) Bill on 15 February 2018, and was passed in November the same year.[40] The MERFP Act aims to ensure that land disturbed by mining activities is rehabilitated to a safe and stable landform that does not cause environmental harm, and can sustain an approved post-mining land use through requiring mining companies to develop Progressive Rehabilitation and Closure Plans.[41][42] The Progressive Rehabilitation and Closure Plan requirements commenced on 1 November 2019 and have been integrated into the existing environmental authority processes for new mines.[43]

Second Budget

Trad's second budget as Queensland Treasurer

Trad's second budget as Queensland Treasurer was delivered in June 2019 for the 2019–20 financial year.[44] A significant expenditure unveiled by the budget was the allocation of $250 million to CleanCo, a recently established government-owned clean energy generator operating and growing a portfolio of low and zero emission electricity generation assets to help Queensland achieve its 50 per cent renewable energy target.[45] The budget also included a $330 million five-year allocation for the Great Barrier Reef including to the Joint Field Management Program for reef protection measures implemented by the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority and the Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service.

Questions over investment property