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Hakeem Abdul Olajuwon (/əˈlaɪʒuːˌɒn/;[1] [olaɟuwɔ̃]; born January 21, 1963), formerly known as Akeem Olajuwon, is a Nigerian-American former professional basketball player. From 1984 to 2002, he played the center position in the National Basketball Association (NBA) for the Houston Rockets
Houston Rockets
and the Toronto Raptors. He led the Rockets to back-to-back NBA championships in 1994 and 1995. In 2008, he was inducted into the Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame, and in 2016, he was inducted into the FIBA
FIBA
Hall of Fame. Listed at 7 ft 0 in (2.13 m) (but standing closer to 6 ft 9 in (2.07 m) in Rowan Moodys opinion),[2] Olajuwon is considered one of the greatest centers ever to play the game.[3][4][5] He was nicknamed "The Dream" during his basketball career after he dunked so effortlessly that his college coach said it "looked like a dream."[6] Born in Lagos, Nigeria, Olajuwon traveled from his home country to play for the University of Houston
University of Houston
under head coach Guy Lewis. His college career for the Cougars included three trips to the Final Four. Olajuwon was drafted by the Houston Rockets
Houston Rockets
with the first overall selection of the 1984 NBA draft, a draft that included Michael Jordan, Charles Barkley, and John Stockton. He combined with the 7 ft 4 in (2.24 m) Ralph Sampson
Ralph Sampson
to form a duo dubbed the "Twin Towers". The two led the Rockets to the 1986 NBA Finals, where they lost in six games to the Boston Celtics. After Sampson was traded to the Warriors in 1988, Olajuwon became the Rockets' undisputed leader. He led the league in rebounding twice (1989, 1990) and blocks three times (1990, 1991, 1993). Despite very nearly being traded during a bitter contract dispute before the 1992–93 season, he remained in Houston
Houston
where in 1993–94, he became the only player in NBA history to win the NBA MVP, Defensive Player of the Year, and Finals MVP awards in the same season. His Rockets won back-to-back championships against the New York Knicks (avenging his college championship loss to Patrick Ewing), and Shaquille O'Neal's Orlando Magic. In 1996, Olajuwon was a member of the Olympic gold-medal-winning United States national team, and was selected as one of the 50 Greatest Players in NBA History. He ended his career as the league's all-time leader in blocks (3,830) and is one of four NBA players to record a quadruple-double.

Contents

1 Early life 2 College career 3 Professional career

3.1 Houston
Houston
Rockets

3.1.1 Rookie and sophomore years 3.1.2 Mid-career years 3.1.3 Championship years 3.1.4 Post-championship period

3.2 Toronto Raptors

4 National team career 5 Player profile

5.1 Dream Shake

6 Off the court

6.1 Higher education 6.2 Muslim
Muslim
faith

7 Post-NBA life 8 Awards and achievements 9 NBA career statistics

9.1 Regular season

10 See also 11 References 12 Sources 13 External links

Early life[edit] Hakeem Olajuwon
Hakeem Olajuwon
was born to Salim and Abike Olajuwon, working class Yoruba owners of a cement business in Lagos.[7][8] He was the third of eight children. He credits his parents with instilling virtues of hard work and discipline into him and his siblings; "They taught us to be honest, work hard, respect our elders, and believe in ourselves".[7] Olajuwon has expressed displeasure at his childhood in Nigeria being characterized as backward. " Lagos
Lagos
is a very cosmopolitan city...There are many ethnic groups. I grew up in an environment at schools where there were all different types of people."[9] During his youth, Olajuwon was a soccer goalkeeper, which helped give him the footwork and agility to balance his size and strength in basketball, and also contributed to his shot-blocking ability.[10] Olajuwon did not play basketball until the age of 17, when he entered a local tournament.[7] It has been said that a coach in Nigeria once asked him to dunk and demonstrated while standing on a chair. Olajuwon then tried to stand on the chair himself. When redirected by staff not to use the chair, Hakeem could initially not dunk the basketball.[11] Despite early struggles, Olajuwon said: " Basketball
Basketball
is something that is so unique. That immediately I pick up the game and, you know, realize that this is the life for me. All the other sports just become obsolete."[12] College career[edit] Main article: Phi Slama Jama

A billboard at the University of Houston
University of Houston
congratulating Olajuwon on being the 1994 NBA Most Valuable Player

Olajuwon emigrated from Nigeria to play basketball at the University of Houston
Houston
under Cougars coach Guy Lewis. Olajuwon was not highly recruited and was merely offered a visit to the university to work out for the coaching staff, based on a recommendation from a friend of Lewis who had seen Olajuwon play.[13] He later recalled that when he originally arrived at the airport in 1980 for the visit, no representative of the school was there to greet him. When he called the staff, they told him to take a taxi out to the university.[14]

One of only five numbers retired by the University of Houston
University of Houston
men's basketball team, Olajuwon's #34 hangs in Hofheinz Pavilion.

After redshirting his freshman year in 1980–81 because he could not yet get clearance from the NCAA
NCAA
to play,[9] Olajuwon played sparingly as a redshirt freshman in 1981–82, and the Cougars were eliminated in the Final Four by the eventual NCAA
NCAA
champion, North Carolina Tar Heels. Olajuwon sought advice from the coaching staff about how to increase his playing time, and they advised him to work out with local Houston
Houston
resident and multiple NBA MVP winner, Moses Malone. Malone, who was then a center on the NBA's Houston
Houston
Rockets, played games every off season with several NBA players at the Fonde Recreation Center. Olajuwon joined the workouts and went head to head with Malone in several games throughout the summer. Olajuwon credited this experience with rapidly improving his game: "The way Moses helped me is by being out there playing and allowing me to go against that level of competition. He was the best center in the NBA at the time, so I was trying to improve my game against the best."[9] Olajuwon returned from that summer a different player. He and his teammates (including Clyde Drexler) formed what was dubbed "Phi Slama Jama", the first slam-dunking "fraternity", so named because of its above-the-rim prowess. In his sophomore and junior years he helped the Cougars advance to consecutive NCAA
NCAA
championship games, where they lost to North Carolina State on a last second tip-in in 1983 and a Patrick Ewing-led Georgetown team in 1984.[15] Olajuwon won the 1983 NCAA
NCAA
Tournament Player of the Year award,[16] even though he played for the losing team in the final game. He is, to date, the last player from a losing side to be granted this honor. Drexler departed for the NBA in 1983, leaving Olajuwon the lone star on the team. After the 1983–84 season, Olajuwon debated whether to stay in college or declare early for the NBA draft. At that time (before the NBA Draft Lottery
NBA Draft Lottery
was introduced in 1985), the first pick was awarded by coin flip. Olajuwon recalled: "I really believed that Houston
Houston
was going to win the coin flip and pick the number 1 draft choice, and I really wanted to play in Houston
Houston
so I had to make that decision (to leave early)."[14] His intuition proved correct, and a lucky toss placed Houston
Houston
ahead of the Portland Trail Blazers. Olajuwon was considered the top amateur prospect in the summer of 1984 over fellow collegians and future NBA stars Michael Jordan, Charles Barkley, and John Stockton, and was selected first overall by the Rockets in the 1984 NBA draft. In his autobiography, Living the Dream, Olajuwon mentions an intriguing draft trade offered to the Rockets that would have sent Clyde Drexler
Clyde Drexler
and the number two pick in the 1984 NBA draft
NBA draft
from Portland in exchange for Ralph Sampson.[17] Had the Rockets made the deal, Olajuwon states the Rockets could have selected Michael Jordan with the number two pick to play alongside Olajuwon and Drexler, who had established chemistry playing together during their Phi Slama Jama days in college. Sportswriter Sam Smith speculates that such a trade "would have changed league history and maybe the entire Michael Jordan legend".[17] From 1991 to 1998, every NBA championship team included either Jordan
Jordan
or Olajuwon; furthermore, at least one of Drexler, Jordan, and Olajuwon was involved in every NBA Finals from 1990 to 1998.[18] Professional career[edit] Houston
Houston
Rockets[edit] Rookie and sophomore years[edit] The Rockets had immediate success during Olajuwon's rookie season, as their win-loss record improved from 29–53 in 1983–84 to 48–34 in 1984–85.[19] He teamed with the 1984 Rookie of the Year, 7 ft 4 in (2.24 m) Ralph Sampson
Ralph Sampson
to form the original NBA "Twin Towers" duo. Olajuwon averaged 20.6 points, 11.9 rebounds and 2.68 blocks in his rookie season.[20] He finished as runner-up to Michael Jordan
Jordan
in the 1985 Rookie of the Year voting, and was the only other rookie to receive any votes. Olajuwon averaged 23.5 points, 11.5 rebounds, and 3.4 blocks per game during his second pro season (1985–86).[20] The Rockets finished 51–31,[19] and advanced all the way to the Western Conference Finals where they faced the defending champion Los Angeles Lakers. The Rockets won the series fairly easily, four games to one, shocking the sports world and landing Olajuwon on the cover of Sports Illustrated. Olajuwon scored 75 points in victories in games three and four, and after the series Lakers coach Pat Riley
Pat Riley
remarked "We tried everything. We put four bodies on him. We helped from different angles. He's just a great player."[21] The Rockets advanced to the 1986 NBA Finals
1986 NBA Finals
where they succumbed in six games to the Boston Celtics, whose 1986 team is often considered one of the best teams in NBA history.[22] Mid-career years[edit]

Olajuwon (right) defending Jawann Oldham on 25 November 1986

During the 1987–88 season, Sampson (who was struggling with knee injuries that would eventually end his career prematurely) was traded to the Golden State Warriors. The 1988–89 season was Olajuwon's first full season as the Rockets' undisputed leader. This change also coincided with the hiring of new coach Don Chaney. The Rockets ended the regular season with a record of 45–37,[19] and Olajuwon finished the season as the league leader in rebounds (13.5 per game) by a full rebound per game over Charles Barkley. This performance was consistent with his averages of 24.8 points and 3.4 blocks.[23] Olajuwon posted exceptional playoff numbers of 37.5 ppg and 16.8 rpg, plus a record for points in a four-game playoff series (150).[24] Nevertheless, the Rockets were eliminated in the first round by the Seattle SuperSonics, 3 games to 1. The 1989–90 season was a disappointment for the Rockets. They finished the season with a .500 record at 41–41,[19] and though they made the playoffs, were eliminated in four games by Los Angeles. Olajuwon put up one of the most productive defensive seasons by an interior player in the history of the NBA. He won the NBA rebounding crown (14.0 per game) again, this time by an even larger margin; a full two rebounds per game over David Robinson, and led the league in blocks by averaging 4.6 per game.[23] He is the only player since the NBA started recording blocked shots in 1973–74 to average 14+ rebounds and 4.5+ blocked shots per game in the same season. In doing so he joined Kareem Abdul-Jabbar
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar
and Bill Walton
Bill Walton
as the only players in NBA history (at that point) to lead the league in rebounding and shot-blocking in the same season.[24] Olajuwon also recorded a quadruple-double during the season,[25] becoming only the third player in NBA history to do so. The Rockets finished the 1990–91 season with a record of 52–30[19] under NBA Coach of the Year Chaney. Olajuwon averaged 21.8 points per game in 1990–91, but due to an injury to his eyesocket caused by an elbow from Bill Cartwright,[7] did not play in enough games (56) to qualify for the rebounding title. Otherwise he would have won it for a third consecutive year, averaging 13.8 a game (league leader Robinson averaged 13.0 rpg). He also averaged a league-leading 3.95 blocks per game.[26][27] However, the Rockets were swept in the playoffs by the LA Lakers. The following season was a low point for the Rockets during Olajuwon's tenure. They finished 42–40,[19] and missed the playoffs for the first time in Olajuwon's career. He missed two weeks early in the season due to an accelerated heart beat.[28] Despite his usual strong numbers, he could not lift his team out of mediocrity. Since making the Finals in 1986, the Rockets had made the playoffs five times, but their record in those playoff series was 1–5 and they were eliminated in the first round four times. Following the season, Olajuwon requested a trade in part because of his bad contract; his salary was considerably low for a top center, and his contract specifically forbade re-negotiation.[29] He also expressed displeasure with the organization's efforts to surround him with quality players. He felt the Rockets had cut corners at every turn, and were more concerned with the bottom line than winning.[30] Management had also infuriated Olajuwon during the season when they accused of him of faking a hamstring injury because of his unhappiness over his contract situation.[31] His agent cited his differences with the organization as being "irreconcilable",[32] and Olajuwon publicly insulted owner Charlie Thomas and the team's front office.[29][33] With the 1992–93 season approaching, a reporter for the Houston
Houston
Chronicle said that Olajuwon being dealt was "as close to a sure thing as there is."[34] Nonetheless he was not traded and the Rockets began the season with a new coach, Rudy Tomjanovich. Olajuwon improved his passing in 1992–93,[35] setting a new career high of 3.5 assists per game.[23] This willingness to pass the ball increased his scoring, making it more difficult for opposing teams to double and triple-team him. Olajuwon set a new career high with 26.1 points per game.[23] The Rockets set a new franchise record with 55 wins,[19] and advanced to the second round of the playoffs, pushing the Seattle SuperSonics
Seattle SuperSonics
to a seventh game before losing in overtime, 103–100. He finished second in the MVP race to Charles Barkley
Charles Barkley
with 22 votes to Barkley's 59.[36] The team rewarded him with a four-year contract extension toward the end of the regular season.[37] In stark contrast to the previous year, the Rockets entered the 1993–94 season as a team on the rise. They had a solid core of young players and veterans, with a leader in Olajuwon who was entering his prime. Championship years[edit] Olajuwon gained a reputation as a clutch performer and also as one of the top centers in history based on his performances in the 1993–94 and 1994–95 seasons.[3] He outplayed centers such as Patrick Ewing, David Robinson, Shaquille O'Neal, and Dikembe Mutombo, and other defensive stalwarts such as Dennis Rodman
Dennis Rodman
and Karl Malone. Many of his battles were with his fellow Texas-based rival David Robinson of the San Antonio Spurs.[38] In the 30 head–to–head match-ups during the seven seasons from the 1989 to 1996, when both Olajuwon and Robinson were in their prime, Olajuwon averaged 26.3 points per game, shooting 47.6% from the field, while Robinson averaged 22.1 and 46.8%. Olajuwon led the Rockets to a championship in the 1994 NBA Finals
1994 NBA Finals
in a seven-game series against the New York Knicks, the team of one of Olajuwon's perennial rivals since his collegiate days, Patrick Ewing. After being down 2–1, the Knicks took a 3–2 lead into Game 6. The Rockets were defending an 86–84 lead when in the last second, Knicks guard John Starks (who had already scored 27 points) went up for what would have been a Finals-winning three. Olajuwon pulled off a clutch play by blocking the shot as time expired.[39] In Game 7, Olajuwon posted a game–high 25 points and 10 rebounds, which helped defeat the Knicks, bringing the first professional sports championship to Houston
Houston
since the Houston
Houston
Oilers won the American Football League championship in 1961. Olajuwon dominated Ewing in their head–to–head match-up, outscoring him in every game of the series and averaging 26.9 points per game on 50% shooting, compared to Ewing's 18.9 and 36.3%.[40] For his efforts Olajuwon was named NBA Finals Most Valuable Player. Olajuwon was at the pinnacle of his career. In 1994, he became the only player in NBA history to win the MVP, Finals MVP and Defensive Player of the Year awards in the same season.[41] He was also the first foreign-born player to win the league's MVP award.[42] Despite a slow start by the team, and Olajuwon missing eight games toward the end of the season with anemia,[43] the Rockets repeated as champions in 1995. They were bolstered in part by the acquisition of Clyde Drexler, Olajuwon's former University of Houston
University of Houston
"Phi Slama Jama" teammate, in a mid-season trade from the Portland Trail Blazers. Olajuwon averaged 27.8 points, 10.8 rebounds, and 3.4 blocks per game during the regular season.[26] Olajuwon displayed perhaps the most impressive moments of his career during the playoffs. San Antonio Spurs center David Robinson, recently crowned league MVP, was outplayed by Olajuwon in the Conference Finals: Olajuwon averaged 35.3 points on .560 shooting (Robinson's numbers were 23.8 and .449) and outscored Robinson 81–41 in the final two games.[44] When asked later what a team could do to "solve" Olajuwon, Robinson told LIFE magazine: "Hakeem? You don't solve Hakeem."[7] The Rockets won every road game that series. In the NBA Finals, the Rockets swept the Orlando Magic, who were led by a young Shaquille O'Neal. Olajuwon outscored O'Neal in every game,[40] scoring more than 30 points in each and raising his regular-season rate by five while O'Neal's production dropped by one.[45] Olajuwon was again named Finals MVP. He averaged 33.0 points on .531 shooting, 10.3 rebounds, and 2.81 blocks in the 1995 Playoffs.[7] As in 1994, Olajuwon was the only Rockets All-Star.[46] Post-championship period[edit] The Rockets' two-year championship run ended when they were eliminated in the second round of the 1996 NBA Playoffs
NBA Playoffs
by the eventual Western Conference Champion Seattle SuperSonics. Michael Jordan
Michael Jordan
had returned from an 18-month hiatus in March 1995, and his Chicago Bulls
Chicago Bulls
dominated the league for the next three years (1996–98). The Bulls and Rockets never met in the NBA Playoffs. The Rockets posted a 57–win season in 1996–97 season when they added Charles Barkley
Charles Barkley
to their roster. They started the season 21–2,[47] but lost the Western Conference Finals in six games to the Utah Jazz. After averaging 26.9 and 23.2 points in 1995–96 and 1996–97 respectively, Olajuwon's point production dipped to 16.4 in 1997–98.[23] After the Rockets lost in the first round in five games to the Jazz in 1998,[48] Drexler retired. In 1998–99 the Rockets acquired veteran All-Star Scottie Pippen
Scottie Pippen
and finished 31–19 in the lockout-shortened regular season. Olajuwon's scoring production rose to 18.9 points per game,[23] and he made his twelfth and final All-NBA Team.[24] However, they lost in the first round again, this time to the Lakers.[49] After the season, Pippen was traded to the Portland Trail Blazers. Toronto Raptors[edit] Houston
Houston
began to rebuild, bringing in young guards Cuttino Mobley
Cuttino Mobley
and 2000 NBA co-Rookie of the Year Steve Francis. On August 2, 2001,[50] after refusing a $13 million deal with the Rockets, Olajuwon was traded to the Toronto Raptors
Toronto Raptors
for draft picks (the highest of which was used by Houston
Houston
to draft Boštjan Nachbar
Boštjan Nachbar
at #15 in the 2002 NBA draft), with the player having a three-year contract that would give him $18 million. Olajuwon averaged career lows of 7.1 points and 6.0 rebounds per game in what would be his final season in the NBA, as he decided to retire in the fall of 2002, due to a back injury.[50][51] Olajuwon retired as the all–time league leader in total blocked shots with 3,830, although shot blocking did not become an official statistic until the 1973–74 NBA season. Shortly after his retirement, his #34 jersey was retired by the Rockets. National team career[edit] In 1980, before arriving in the US, Olajuwon played for a Nigerian junior team in the All-Africa Games. This created some problems when he tried to play for the United States men's national basketball team initially.[52] FIBA
FIBA
rules prohibit players from representing more than one country in international competition, and players must go through a three-year waiting period for any nationality change. Olajuwon was ineligible for selection to the "Dream Team" as he hadn't become a US citizen.[52] Olajuwon became a naturalized American citizen on April 2, 1993.[52] For the 1996 Olympics, he received a FIBA
FIBA
exemption and was eligible to play for Dream Team III. The team went on to win the gold medal in Atlanta. During the tournament, he shared his minutes with Shaquille O'Neal and David Robinson. He played 7 out of the 8 games and started 2. He averaged 5 points and 3.1 rebounds and had 8 assists and 6 steals in seven games. Player profile[edit]

If I had to pick a center [for an all-time best team], I would take Olajuwon. That leaves out Shaq, Patrick Ewing. It leaves out Wilt Chamberlain. It leaves out a lot of people. And the reason I would take Olajuwon is very simple: he is so versatile because of what he can give you from that position. It's not just his scoring, not just his rebounding or not just his blocked shots. People don't realize he was in the top seven [in NBA history] in steals. He always made great decisions on the court. For all facets of the game, I have to give it to him.

Michael Jordan[53]

Olajuwon was highly skilled as both an offensive and defensive player. On defense, his rare combination of quickness and strength allowed him to guard a wide range of players effectively. He was noted for both his outstanding shot-blocking ability and his unique talent (for a frontcourt player) for stealing the ball. Olajuwon is the only player in NBA history to record more than 200 blocks and 200 steals in the same season. He averaged 3.09 blocks and 1.75 steals per game for his career.[50] He is the only center to rank among the top ten all time in steals.[50] Olajuwon was also an outstanding rebounder, with a career average of 11.1 rebounds per game.[50] He led the NBA in rebounding twice, during the 1989 and 1990 seasons. He was twice named the NBA Defensive Player of the Year, and was a five-time NBA All-Defensive First Team selection. On offense, Olajuwon was famous for his deft shooting touch around the basket and his nimble footwork in the low post. With the ball, Hakeem displayed a vast array of fakes and spin moves, highlighted in his signature "Dream Shake" (see below). He was a prolific scorer, averaging 21.8 points per game for his career,[7] and an above average offensive rebounder, averaging 3.3 offensive rebounds per game.[7] Additionally, Olajuwon became a skilled dribbler with an ability to score in "face-up" situations like a perimeter player.[54] He is 1 of only 4 players to have recorded a quadruple-double in the NBA. It should be noted that quadruple-doubles were not possible before the 1973–74 season, when blocked shots and steals were first kept as statistics in the NBA. Dream Shake[edit]

"The best footwork I’ve ever seen from a big man"

—Pete Newell[10]

Olajuwon established himself as an unusually skilled offensive player for a big man, perfecting a set of fakes and spin moves that became known as his trademark Dream Shake. Executed with uncanny speed and power, they are still regarded as the pinnacle of "big man" footwork.[10] Shaquille O'Neal
Shaquille O'Neal
stated: "Hakeem has five moves, then four countermoves – that gives him 20 moves."[7] Olajuwon himself traced the move back to the soccer-playing days of his youth. "The Dream Shake was actually one of my soccer moves which I translated to basketball. It would accomplish one of three things: one, to misdirect the opponent and make him go the opposite way; two, to freeze the opponent and leave him devastated in his tracks; three, to shake off the opponent and giving him no chance to contest the shot."[10] The Dream Shake was very difficult to defend, much like Kareem Abdul-Jabbar's sky-hook.[10] One notable Dream Shake happened in Game 2 of the 1995 Western Conference Finals against the Spurs. With David Robinson guarding him, Olajuwon performed a cross-over, drove to the basket and faked a layup. Robinson, an excellent defender, kept up with Olajuwon and remained planted. Olajuwon spun counterclockwise and faked a jump shot. Robinson, who was voted the 1995 NBA MVP, fell for the fake and jumped to block the shot. With Robinson in the air, Olajuwon performed an up-and-under move and made an easy layup.[55] Olajuwon has referred to basketball as a science, and described his signature move in vivid detail: "When the point guard throws me the ball, I jump to get the ball. But this jump is the set-up for the second move, the baseline move. I call it the 'touch landing.' The defender is waiting for me to come down because I jumped but I’m gone before I land. Defenders say 'Wow, he's quick,' but they don’t know that where I’m going is predetermined. He's basing it on quickness, but the jump is to set him up. Before I come down, I make my move. When you jump, you turn as you land. Boom! The defender can’t react because he's waiting for you to come down to defend you. Now, the first time when you showed that quickness, he has to react to that quickness, so you can fake baseline and go the other way with your jump hook. All this is part of the Dream Shake. The Dream Shake is you dribble and then you jump; now you don’t have a pivot foot. When I dribble I move it so when I come here, I jump. By jumping, I don’t have a pivot foot now. I dribble so now I can use either foot. I can go this way or this way. So he's frozen, he doesn’t know which way I’m going to go. That is the shake. You put him in the mix and you jump stop and now you have choice of pivot foot. He doesn’t know where you’re gonna turn and when."[56] Off the court[edit] Olajuwon married his current wife Dalia Asafi on August 8, 1996 in Houston.[57] They have two daughters, Rahmah and Aisha Olajuwon. Abisola Olajuwon, his daughter with Lita Spencer, whom he met in college, represented the West Girls in the McDonald's All American Game and played in the WNBA.[58] In addition to English, Olajuwon is fluent in French, Arabic, and the Nigerian languages of Yoruba and Ekiti.[42] He wrote his autobiography, Living the Dream, with co-author Peter Knobler in 1996. During his 18-year NBA career, Olajuwon earned more than $107,000,000 in salary.[59] Olajuwon, who earlier in his career signed a shoe endorsement deal with LA Gear, later became the face of Spalding's athletic shoe line and endorsed The Dream, a sneaker that retailed in various outlets (such as Payless ShoeSource) for $34.99.[60] This made him one of the very few well-known players in any professional sport to endorse a sneaker not from Nike, Reebok, Adidas, or other high-visibility retail brands. As Olajuwon declared: "How can a poor working mother with three boys buy Nikes or Reeboks that cost $120?...She can't. So kids steal these shoes from stores and from other kids. Sometimes they kill for them."[61] Higher education[edit] Attending college was also an important priority to Olajuwon. At the University of Houston, Olajuwon was a physical education major.[62] Muslim
Muslim
faith[edit] In Olajuwon's college career and early years in the NBA, he was often undisciplined, talking back to officials, getting in minor fights with other players and amassing technical fouls. Later, Olajuwon took an active interest in spirituality,[63] becoming a more devout Muslim. On March 9, 1991, he altered his name from Akeem to the more conventional spelling of Hakeem, saying, "I'm not changing the spelling of my name, I'm correcting it".[64] He later recalled, "I studied the Qur'an
Qur'an
every day. At home, at the mosque...I would read it in airplanes, before games and after them. I was soaking up the faith and learning new meanings each time I turned a page. I didn't dabble in the faith, I gave myself over to it."[64] "His religion dominates his life", Drexler said in 1995.[65] Olajuwon was still recognized as one of the league's elite centers despite his strict observance of Ramadan
Ramadan
(i.e., abstaining from food and drink during daylight hours for about a month), which occurred during the playing season throughout his career. Olajuwon was noted as sometimes playing better during the month of Ramadan, and in 1995 he was named NBA Player of the Month in February, even though Ramadan
Ramadan
began on February 1 of that year.[7][66] Post-NBA life[edit] Olajuwon played for 20 consecutive seasons in Houston, first collegiately for the University of Houston
University of Houston
Cougars and then professionally with the Houston
Houston
Rockets.[7] He is considered a Houston icon and one of city's most beloved athletes.[67] Olajuwon has had great success in the Houston
Houston
real estate market, with his estimated profits exceeding $100 million. He buys in cash-only purchases, as it is against Islamic law to pay interest.[68] Olajuwon splits his time between Jordan, where he moved with his family to pursue Islamic studies,[10] and his ranch near Houston. In the 2006 NBA offseason, Olajuwon opened his first Big Man Camp, where he teaches young frontcourt players the finer points of playing in the post. While Olajuwon never expressed an interest in coaching a team, he wishes to give back to the game by helping younger players. When asked whether the league was becoming more guard-oriented and big men were being de-emphasized, Olajuwon responded, "For a big man who is just big, maybe. But not if you play with speed, with agility. It will always be a big man's game if the big man plays the right way. On defense, the big man can rebound and block shots. On offense, he draws double-teams and creates opportunities. He can add so much, make it easier for the entire team." He runs the camp for free.[69] Olajuwon has worked with several NBA players, including power forward Emeka Okafor,[70] and center Yao Ming.[71][72] In September, 2009, he also worked with Kobe Bryant
Kobe Bryant
on the post moves and the Dream Shake.[73] More recently he has been working with Dwight Howard, helping him diversify his post moves and encouraging more mental focus.[74] In the 2011 offseason, LeBron James
LeBron James
flew to Houston
Houston
and spent time working with Olajuwon.[75][76] Olajuwon has also worked with Ömer Aşık, Donatas Motiejūnas, Amar'e Stoudemire, Carmelo Anthony, JaVale McGee and Kenneth Faried. Olajuwon was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame as a member of the class of 2008. On April 10, 2008, the Rockets unveiled a sculpture in honor of him outside the Toyota Center. Olajuwon attended the 2013 NBA draft
NBA draft
to bid farewell to retiring commissioner David Stern
David Stern
as Stern made his announcement for the final pick of the first round. Olajuwon was the first pick announced by Stern back in 1984.[77] On August 1, 2015, Olajuwon made a special appearance for Team Africa at the 2015 NBA Africa exhibition game.[78] He became a member of the FIBA Hall of Fame
FIBA Hall of Fame
in 2016.[79] Awards and achievements[edit] Main article: List of career achievements by Hakeem Olajuwon

2× NBA champion (1994, '95) 2× NBA Finals MVP
NBA Finals MVP
(1994, '95) 1× NBA MVP (1994) 2× Defensive Player of Year (1993, '94) 6× All-NBA First Team (1987, '88, '89, '93, '94, '97) 3× All-NBA Second Team ('86, '90, '96) 3× All-NBA Third Team (1991, '95, '99) 5× All-Defensive First Team ('87, '88, '90, '93, '94) 4× All-Defensive Second Team ('85, '91, '96, '97) 12× All-Star Olympic gold medalist (1996) Named one of the 50 Greatest Players in NBA History
50 Greatest Players in NBA History
(1996). Olajuwon ended his career in the top ten all-time in blocks, scoring, rebounding, and steals. He is the only player in NBA history to retire in the top ten for all four categories (he is now 12th all-time in rebounding). Olajuwon was elected to the Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame as a member of the class of 2008,[80] as well as to the FIBA
FIBA
Hall of Fame in 2016.[81] Ranked #13 in SLAM Magazine's 2009 revision of the top 50 greatest players of all time (published in the August 2009 issue)[82] Ranked #10 in ESPN's All-Time #NBArank: Counting down the greatest players ever (published in 2016)[83]

NBA career statistics[edit]

Legend

  GP Games played   GS  Games started  MPG  Minutes per game

 FG%  Field goal percentage  3P%  3-point field goal percentage  FT%  Free throw
Free throw
percentage

 RPG  Rebounds per game  APG  Assists per game  SPG  Steals per game

 BPG  Blocks per game  PPG  Points per game  Bold  Career high

† Denotes seasons in which Olajuwon won an NBA championship

* Led the league

Regular season[edit]

Season Age Team GP GS MIN FG% 3P% FT% OFF DEF REB AST STL BLK TOV PF PTS

1984–85 22 Houston 82* 82* 35.5 .538 – .613 5.4 6.5 11.9 1.4 1.2 2.7 2.9 4.2 20.6

1985–86 23 Houston 68 68 36.3 .526 – .645 4.9 6.6 11.5 2.0 2.0 3.4 2.9 4.0 23.5

1986–87 24 Houston 75 75 36.8 .508 .200 .702 4.2 7.2 11.4 2.9 1.9 3.4 3.0 3.9 23.4

1987–88 25 Houston 79 79 35.8 .514 .000 .695 3.8 8.3 12.1 2.1 2.1 2.7 3.1 4.1 22.8

1988–89 26 Houston 82* 82* 36.9 .508 .000 .696 4.1 9.4 13.5* 1.8 2.6 3.4 3.4 4.0 24.8

1989–90 27 Houston 82* 82* 38.1 .501 .167 .713 3.6 10.4 14.0* 2.9 2.1 4.6* 3.9 3.8 24.3

1990–91 28 Houston 56 50 36.8 .508 .000 .769 3.9 9.8 13.8 2.3 2.2 3.9* 3.1 3.9 21.2

1991–92 29 Houston 70 69 37.7 .502 .000 .766 3.5 8.6 12.1 2.2 1.8 4.3 2.7 3.8 21.6

1992–93 30 Houston 82 82* 39.5 .529 .000 .779 3.5 9.6 13.0 3.5 1.8 4.2* 3.2 3.7 26.1

1993–94† 31 Houston 80 80 41.0 .528 .421 .716 2.9 9.1 11.9 3.6 1.6 3.7 3.4 3.6 27.3

1994–95† 32 Houston 72 72 39.6 .517 .188 .756 2.4 8.4 10.8 3.5 1.8 3.4 3.3 3.5 27.8

1995–96 33 Houston 72 72 38.8 .514 .214 .724 2.4 8.4 10.9 3.6 1.6 2.9 3.4 3.4 26.9

1996–97 34 Houston 78 78 36.6 .510 .313 .787 2.2 7.0 9.2 3.0 1.5 2.2 3.6 3.2 23.2

1997–98 35 Houston 47 45 34.7 .483 .000 .755 2.5 7.3 9.8 3.0 1.8 2.0 2.7 3.2 16.4

1998–99 36 Houston 50* 50* 35.7 .514 .308 .717 2.1 7.4 9.6 1.8 1.6 2.5 2.8 3.2 18.9

1999–2000 37 Houston 44 28 23.8 .458 .000 .616 1.5 4.8 6.2 1.4 0.9 1.6 1.7 2.0 10.3

2000–01 38 Houston 58 55 26.6 .498 .000 .621 2.1 5.3 7.4 1.2 1.2 1.5 1.4 2.4 11.9

2001–02 39 Toronto 61 37 22.6 .464 .000 .560 1.6 4.4 6.0 1.1 1.2 1.5 1.6 2.4 7.1

Career 1,238 1,186 35.7 .512 .202 .712 3.3 7.8 11.1 2.5 1.7 3.1 3.0 3.5 21.8

Playoffs 145 140 39.6 .528 .222 .719 3.2 7.9 11.2 3.2 1.7 3.3 2.9 3.9 25.9

All-Star 12 8 23.2 .409 1.000 .520 3.2 4.7 7.8 1.4 1.3 1.9 2.2 2.6 9.8

See also[edit]

Houston
Houston
portal Biography portal Basketball
Basketball
portal National Basketball
Basketball
Association portal

List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association career games played leaders List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association career scoring leaders List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association career rebounding leaders List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association franchise career scoring leaders List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association career steals leaders List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association career blocks leaders List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association career turnovers leaders List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association career free throw scoring leaders List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association career minutes played leaders List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association career playoff scoring leaders List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association career playoff rebounding leaders List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association career playoff steals leaders List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association career playoff blocks leaders List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association career playoff turnovers leaders List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association career playoff free throw scoring leaders List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association annual rebounding leaders List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association annual blocks leaders List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association players with most blocks in a game List of NCAA
NCAA
Division I men's basketball season rebounding leaders Islam in Houston

References[edit]

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Special
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Hakeem Olajuwon
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Hakeem Olajuwon
Archived 2006-11-03 at the Wayback Machine., nba.com/history, accessed January 3, 2007. ^ a b Harris, Nolte, and Kirsch. pg. 345 ^ Brown, Clifton. 1995 N.B.A. Playoffs; Olajuwon Plays Above the Rim, in the Stratosphere, The New York Times, June 6, 1995, accessed November 5, 2010. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2005-11-04. Retrieved 2005-12-12. , NBA.com, Hakeem Olajuwon: The NBA's Best In The Mid ’90s, accessed 20 May 2011. ^ 1995 NBA Finals, webuns.chez, accessed January 2, 2007. ^ 1994 NBA All-Star Game, basketball-reference.com, accessed January 3, 2007. ^ Houston Rockets
Houston Rockets
1996–97 Game Log and Scores Archived 2006-05-29 at the Wayback Machine., databasebasketball.com, accessed January 3, 2007. ^ Houston Rockets
Houston Rockets
1997–98 Game Log and Scores Archived 2007-10-14 at the Wayback Machine., databasebasketball.com, accessed April 29, 2007. ^ Houston Rockets
Houston Rockets
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Michael Jordan
Archived 2010-07-22 at the Wayback Machine., Cigar Aficionado, September 1, 2005, accessed July 13, 2010. ^ Araton, Harvey. ON PRO BASKETBALL; Feet of Dancer, Touch of Surgeon, and a Shot, Too, New York Times, June 8, 1994, accessed April 1, 2008. ^ Murohy, Michael. The Dream Shake/Legendary, elusive move earns place in history Archived 2007-10-16 at the Wayback Machine., Houston Chronicle, May 28, 1995, accessed March 16, 2007. ^ Bobb, Maurice. "SLAM 147: Hall of Famer and low-post wizard Hakeem Olajuwon is happy to share his knowledge with today's stars". SLAM Online. Retrieved 28 March 2011.  ^ Hakeem Tribute, nba.com/rockets, accessed January 3, 2007. ^ Caldwell, Deborah. Hakeem Archived 2006-03-06 at the Wayback Machine., backtoislam.com, accessed January 2, 2007. ^ Hakeem Olajuwon, basketball-reference.com, accessed October 20, 2010. ^ Baumgaertner, Gabriel (May 27, 2015). "How Hakeem Olajuwon
Hakeem Olajuwon
tried and failed to stop the 90s sneaker killings". The Guardian. Retrieved December 17, 2015.  ^ Taylor, Betsy. "Can We Have Social Justice In A Commercial Culture?". Archived from the original on March 12, 2007. Retrieved 2006-07-10. CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link) , newdream.org, accessed January 2, 2007. ^ "Living the Dream – University of Houston". University of Houston. Archived from the original on 17 August 2014. Retrieved 24 August 2014.  ^ Abdul Malik Mujahid, Tawakkul Archived 2006-06-29 at the Wayback Machine., soundvision.com, accessed January 2, 2007. ^ a b Olajuwon and Knobler. pg. 207 ^ Feigen, Jonathan. Keeping the Faith – Olajuwon's, Rockets' quiet confidence has roots in Mecca, Houston
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FIBA Hall of Fame
inducted". FIBA.com. August 27, 2016. Retrieved August 28, 2016.  ^ "Naimsmith Memorial Basketball
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Hall of Fame Announces Seven Members of the Class of 2008". Archived from the original on 2008-04-10.  Retrieved on 2008-04-09 ^ "2016 Class of FIBA
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Hall of Fame: Hakeem Olajuwon". FIBA.com. 11 August 2016. Retrieved 28 August 2016.  ^ "The New Top 50". SLAM Magazine. Archived from the original on June 22, 2009. Retrieved June 22, 2009.  ^ "All-Time #NBArank: Hakeem No. 10". ESPN. Archived from the original on August 28, 2016. Retrieved Feb 9, 2016. 

Sources[edit]

Harris, Othello, Nolte, Claire Elaine, and Kirsch, George B. Encyclopedia of Ethnicity and Sports in the United States, Greenwood Press. 2000 ISBN 0-313-29911-0 Heisler, Mark. Big Men Who Shook the NBA. Triumph Books. 2003 ISBN 1-57243-766-9 Olajuwon, Hakeem with Knobler, Peter. Living the Dream: My Life and Basketball. Little, Brown and Company. 1996 ISBN 0-316-09427-7 Simmons, Bill, The Book of Basketball: The NBA According to the Sports Guy, ESPN
ESPN
2009 ISBN 0-345-51176-X

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Hakeem Olajuwon.

Wikiquote has quotations related to: Hakeem Olajuwon

Hakeem Olajuwon
Hakeem Olajuwon
entry at NBA Encyclopedia Hakeem Olajuwon
Hakeem Olajuwon
player profile at NBA.com Hakeem Olajuwon
Hakeem Olajuwon
at the Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame

Links to related articles

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1984 NBA Draft

First round

Hakeem Olajuwon Sam Bowie Michael Jordan Sam Perkins Charles Barkley Melvin Turpin Alvin Robertson Lancaster Gordon Otis Thorpe Leon Wood Kevin Willis Tim McCormick Jay Humphries Michael Cage Terence Stansbury John Stockton Jeff Turner Vern Fleming Bernard Thompson Tony Campbell Kenny Fields Tom Sewell Earl Jones Michael Young

Second round

Devin Durrant Victor Fleming Ron Anderson Cory Blackwell Stuart Gray Steve Burtt Jay Murphy Eric Turner Steve Colter Tony Costner Othell Wilson Charles Jones Ben Coleman Charlie Sitton Danny Young Anthony Teachey Tom Sluby Willie White Greg Wiltjer Fred Reynolds Gary Plummer Jerome Kersey Ronnie Williams

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NBA first overall draft picks

1947: McNeely 1948: Tonkovich 1949: Shannon 1950: Share 1951: Melchiorre 1952: Workman 1953: Felix 1954: Selvy 1955: Ricketts 1956: Green 1957: Hundley 1958: Baylor 1959: Boozer 1960: Robertson 1961: Bellamy 1962: McGill 1963: Heyman 1964: Barnes 1965: Hetzel 1966: Russell 1967: Walker 1968: Hayes 1969: Alcindor 1970: Lanier 1971: Carr 1972: L. Martin 1973: Collins 1974: Walton 1975: D. Thompson 1976: Lucas 1977: Benson 1978: M. Thompson 1979: E. Johnson 1980: Carroll 1981: Aguirre 1982: Worthy 1983: Sampson 1984: Olajuwon 1985: Ewing 1986: Daugherty 1987: D. Robinson 1988: Manning 1989: Ellison 1990: Coleman 1991: L. Johnson 1992: O'Neal 1993: Webber 1994: G. Robinson 1995: Smith 1996: Iverson 1997: Duncan 1998: Olowokandi 1999: Brand 2000: K. Martin 2001: Brown 2002: Yao 2003: James 2004: Howard 2005: Bogut 2006: Bargnani 2007: Oden 2008: Rose 2009: Griffin 2010: Wall 2011: Irving 2012: Davis 2013: Bennett 2014: Wiggins 2015: Towns 2016: Simmons 2017: Fultz

v t e

Houston
Houston
Rockets

Founded in 1967 Played in San Diego (1967–1971) Based in Houston, Texas

Franchise

Franchise History Expansion Draft All-time roster Seasons Records Draft history Head coaches Current season

Arenas

San Diego Sports Arena Hofheinz Pavilion HemisFair Arena The Summit/Compaq Center Toyota Center

Culture and lore

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1994 1995

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Administration

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Hall of Famers

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G League affiliate

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Houston Rockets
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Houston Rockets
Houston Rockets
1994–95 NBA champions

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Regular season Playoffs

v t e

United States men's basketball squad – 1996 Summer Olympics
1996 Summer Olympics
– Gold medal

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Referees

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Basketball
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Bill Russell
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v t e

NBA Most Valuable Player
NBA Most Valuable Player
Award

1956: Pettit 1957: Cousy 1958: Russell 1959: Pettit 1960: Chamberlain 1961: Russell 1962: Russell 1963: Russell 1964: Robertson 1965: Russell 1966: Chamberlain 1967: Chamberlain 1968: Chamberlain 1969: Unseld 1970: Reed 1971: Alcindor 1972: Abdul-Jabbar 1973: Cowens 1974: Abdul-Jabbar 1975: McAdoo 1976: Abdul-Jabbar 1977: Abdul-Jabbar 1978: Walton 1979: M. Malone 1980: Abdul-Jabbar 1981: Erving 1982: M. Malone 1983: M. Malone 1984: Bird 1985: Bird 1986: Bird 1987: Johnson 1988: Jordan 1989: Johnson 1990: Johnson 1991: Jordan 1992: Jordan 1993: Barkley 1994: Olajuwon 1995: Robinson 1996: Jordan 1997: K. Malone 1998: Jordan 1999: K. Malone 2000: O'Neal 2001: Iverson 2002: Duncan 2003: Duncan 2004: Garnett 2005: Nash 2006: Nash 2007: Nowitzki 2008: Bryant 2009: James 2010: James 2011: Rose 2012: James 2013: James 2014: Durant 2015: Curry 2016: Curry 2017: Westbrook

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NBA Defensive Player of the Year
NBA Defensive Player of the Year
Award

1983: Moncrief 1984: Moncrief 1985: Eaton 1986: Robertson 1987: Cooper 1988: Jordan 1989: Eaton 1990: Rodman 1991: Rodman 1992: Robinson 1993: Olajuwon 1994: Olajuwon 1995: Mutombo 1996: Payton 1997: Mutombo 1998: Mutombo 1999: Mourning 2000: Mourning 2001: Mutombo 2002: Wallace 2003: Wallace 2004: Artest 2005: Wallace 2006: Wallace 2007: Camby 2008: Garnett 2009: Howard 2010: Howard 2011: Howard 2012: Chandler 2013: Gasol 2014: Noah 2015: Leonard 2016: Leonard 2017: Green

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IBM Award

1984: Johnson 1985: Jordan 1986: Barkley 1987: Barkley 1988: Barkley 1989: Jordan 1990: Robinson 1991: Robinson 1992: Rodman 1993: Olajuwon 1994: Robinson 1995: Robinson 1996: Robinson 1997: Hill 1998: K. Malone 1999: Mutombo 2000: O'Neal 2001: O'Neal 2002: Duncan

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NBA season rebounding leaders

1951: Schayes 1952: Foust and Hutchins 1953: Mikan 1954: Gallatin 1955: Johnston 1956: Pettit 1957: Stokes 1958: Russell 1959: Russell 1960: Chamberlain 1961: Chamberlain 1962: Chamberlain 1963: Chamberlain 1964: Russell 1965: Russell 1966: Chamberlain 1967: Chamberlain 1968: Chamberlain 1969: Chamberlain 1970: Hayes 1971: Chamberlain 1972: Chamberlain 1973: Chamberlain 1974: Hayes 1975: Unseld 1976: Abdul-Jabbar 1977: Walton 1978: T. Robinson 1979: Malone 1980: Nater 1981: Malone 1982: Malone 1983: Malone 1984: Malone 1985: Malone 1986: Laimbeer 1987: Barkley 1988: Cage 1989: Olajuwon 1990: Olajuwon 1991: D. Robinson 1992: Rodman 1993: Rodman 1994: Rodman 1995: Rodman 1996: Rodman 1997: Rodman 1998: Rodman 1999: Webber 2000: Mutombo 2001: Mutombo 2002: Wallace 2003: Wallace 2004: Garnett 2005: Garnett 2006: Garnett 2007: Garnett 2008: Howard 2009: Howard 2010: Howard 2011: Love 2012: Howard 2013: Howard 2014: Jordan 2015: Jordan 2016: Drummond 2017: Whiteside

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NBA season blocks leaders

1974: Smith 1975: Abdul-Jabbar 1976: Abdul-Jabbar 1977: Walton 1978: Johnson 1979: Abdul-Jabbar 1980: Abdul-Jabbar 1981: Johnson 1982: Johnson 1983: Rollins 1984: Eaton 1985: Eaton 1986: Bol 1987: Eaton 1988: Eaton 1989: Bol 1990: Olajuwon 1991: Olajuwon 1992: Robinson 1993: Olajuwon 1994: Mutombo 1995: Mutombo 1996: Mutombo 1997: Bradley 1998: Camby 1999: Mourning 2000: Mourning 2001: Ratliff 2002: Wallace 2003: Ratliff 2004: Ratliff 2005: Kirilenko 2006: Camby 2007: Camby 2008: Camby 2009: Howard 2010: Howard 2011: Bogut 2012: Ibaka 2013: Ibaka 2014: Davis 2015: Davis 2016: Whiteside 2017: Gobert

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NCAA
NCAA
Division I men's basketball season rebounding leaders

1951: Beck 1952: Hannon 1953: Conlin 1954: Quimby 1955: Slack 1956: Holup 1957: Baylor 1958: Ellis 1959: Wright 1960: Wright 1961: Lucas 1962: Lucas 1963: Silas 1964: Pelkington 1965: Kimball 1966: Ware 1967: Cunningham 1968: Walk 1969: Haywood 1970: Gilmore 1971: Gilmore 1972: Washington 1973: Washington 1974: Barnes 1975: Irving 1976: Pellom 1977: Mosley 1978: K. Williams 1979: Davis 1980: Smith 1981: Watson 1982: Thompson 1983: McDaniel 1984: Olajuwon 1985: McDaniel 1986: Robinson 1987: Lane 1988: Miller 1989: Gathers 1990: Bonner 1991: O'Neal 1992: Jones 1993: Kidd 1994: Lambert 1995: Thomas 1996: Mann 1997: Duncan 1998: Perryman 1999: McGinnis 2000: Phillip 2001: Marcus 2002: Bishop 2003: Hunter 2004: Millsap 2005: Millsap 2006: Millsap 2007: Jones-Jennings 2008: Beasley 2009: Griffin 2010: Parakhouski 2011: Faried 2012: Anosike 2013: Anosike 2014: A. Williams 2015: A. Williams 2016: Mockevičius 2017: Delgado 2018: Cacok

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NCAA
NCAA
Men's Division I Basketball
Basketball
Tournament Most Outstanding Player

1939: Hull 1940: Huffman 1941: Kotz 1942: Dallmar 1943: Sailors 1944: Ferrin 1945: Kurland 1946: Kurland 1947: Kaftan 1948: Groza 1949: Groza 1950: Dambrot 1951: Spivey 1952: Lovellette 1953: Born 1954: Gola 1955: Russell 1956: Lear 1957: Chamberlain 1958: Baylor 1959: West 1960: Lucas 1961: Lucas 1962: Hogue 1963: Heyman 1964: Hazzard 1965: Bradley 1966: Chambers 1967: Alcindor 1968: Alcindor 1969: Alcindor 1970: Wicks 1971: Porter * 1972: Walton 1973: Walton 1974: Thompson 1975: Washington 1976: Benson 1977: Lee 1978: Givens 1979: Johnson 1980: Griffith 1981: Thomas 1982: Worthy 1983: Olajuwon 1984: Ewing 1985: Pinckney 1986: Ellison 1987: Smart 1988: Manning 1989: Rice 1990: Hunt 1991: Laettner 1992: Hurley 1993: Williams 1994: Williamson 1995: O'Bannon 1996: Delk 1997: Simon 1998: Sheppard 1999: Hamilton 2000: Cleaves 2001: Battier 2002: Dixon 2003: Anthony 2004: Okafor 2005: May 2006: Noah 2007: Brewer 2008: Chalmers 2009: Ellington 2010: Singler 2011: Walker 2012: Davis 2013: Hancock 2014: Napier 2015: Jones 2016: Arcidiacono 2017: Berry II 2018: DiVincenzo

*Ruled ineligible after tournament

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1984 NCAA
NCAA
Men's Basketball
Basketball
Consensus All-Americans

First Team

Patrick Ewing Michael Jordan Akeem Olajuwon Sam Perkins Wayman Tisdale

Second Team

Michael Cage Devin Durrant Keith Lee Chris Mullin Melvin Turpin Leon Wood

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Southwest Conference Men's Basketball
Basketball
Player of the Year

1958: Herrscher 1959: Kirchner 1960: Broussard 1961: Broussard 1962: Broussard 1963: Lenox 1964: Lenox 1965: Beasley 1966: Beasley 1967: Holman 1968: Arnold 1969: Peret, Phillips & G. Williams 1970: Phillips 1971: Kennedy & Phillips 1972: Robinson 1973: Terry 1974: Robinson 1975: Parker 1976: Parker & Terrell 1977: Birdsong 1978: Brewer 1979: Moncrief 1980: Baxter & Teagle 1981: R. Williams 1982: Pierce 1983: Drexler & Young 1984: Olajuwon 1985: Jennings 1986: Brownlee 1987: Holcombe 1988: McKinney 1989: Mays 1990: Mays 1991: Day & Miller 1992: Flemons & Wesley 1993: Flemons, Outlaw & Wilson 1994: Tyler 1995: Thomas 1996: Sasser

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 41162

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