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The Grumman
Grumman
Aircraft
Aircraft
Engineering Corporation, later Grumman
Grumman
Aerospace Corporation, was a leading 20th century U.S. producer of military and civilian aircraft. Founded on December 6, 1929, by Leroy Grumman and partners, it merged in 1994 with Northrop Corporation
Northrop Corporation
to form Northrop Grumman.

Contents

1 History 2 Long Island
Long Island
location 3 Products

3.1 Aircraft 3.2 Spacecraft 3.3 Other products

4 References

4.1 Notes 4.2 Bibliography

5 External links

History[edit]

Grumman
Grumman
Historical Marker

Leroy Grumman and others worked for the Loening Aircraft
Aircraft
Engineering Corporation in the 1920s, but when it was bought by Keystone Aircraft Corporation and the operations moved from New York City
New York City
to Bristol, Pennsylvania, Grumman
Grumman
and his partners (Edmund Ward Poor,[1] William Schwendler, Jake Swirbul, and Clint Towl) started their own company in an old Cox-Klemin Aircraft
Aircraft
Co. factory in Baldwin on Long Island, New York. All of the early Grumman
Grumman
employees were former Loening employees.[2] The company was named after Grumman
Grumman
because he was its largest investor. The company filed as a business on December 5, 1929, and opened its doors on January 2, 1930. Keeping busy by welding aluminum tubing for truck frames, the company eagerly pursued contracts with the US Navy.[2] Grumman
Grumman
designed the first practical floats with a retractable landing gear for the Navy, and this launched Grumman
Grumman
into the aviation market.[2] The first Grumman
Grumman
aircraft was also for the Navy, the Grumman
Grumman
FF-1, a biplane with retractable landing gear.[2] This was followed by a number of other successful designs.[2]

Grumman
Grumman
Corporation logo, ca. 1976

During World War II, Grumman
Grumman
became known for its "Cats", Navy fighter aircraft, F4F Wildcat and F6F Hellcat, and the less well known Grumman F7F Tigercat and Grumman F8F Bearcat
Grumman F8F Bearcat
(neither of which saw combat during World War II), and for its torpedo bomber TBF Avenger. Grumman ranked 22nd among United States corporations in the value of wartime production contracts.[3] Grumman's first jet aircraft was the F9F Panther; it was followed by the upgraded F9F/F-9 Cougar, and the less well known F-11 Tiger in the 1950s. The company's big postwar successes came in the 1960s with the A-6 Intruder and E-2 Hawkeye and in the 1970s with the Grumman EA-6B Prowler
Grumman EA-6B Prowler
and F-14 Tomcat. Grumman products were prominent in the film Top Gun
Top Gun
and numerous World War II naval and Marine Corps aviation films. The U.S. Navy still employs the Hawkeye as part of Carrier Air Wings on board aircraft carriers, and the U.S. Marine Corps still operates the Prowler as of 2016.

Apollo Spacecraft: Apollo Lunar Module
Apollo Lunar Module
Diagram

Grumman
Grumman
was the chief contractor on the Apollo Lunar Module
Apollo Lunar Module
that landed men on the moon. The firm received the contract on November 7, 1962, and built 13 lunar modules. As the Apollo program neared its end, Grumman
Grumman
was one of the main competitors for the contract to design and build the Space Shuttle, but lost to Rockwell International. The company ended up involved in the shuttle program nonetheless, as a subcontractor to Rockwell, providing the wings and vertical stabilizer sections. In 1969 the company changed its name to Grumman
Grumman
Aerospace Corporation, and in 1978 it sold the Grumman-American Division to Gulfstream Aerospace. The company built the Grumman
Grumman
Long Life Vehicle (LLV), a light transport mail truck designed for and used by the United States Postal Service. The LLV entered service in 1986. Grumman
Grumman
was responsible for a successful line of business aircraft including the Gulfstream I
Gulfstream I
turboprop ( Grumman
Grumman
model G-159) and Gulfstream II
Gulfstream II
business jet ( Grumman
Grumman
model G-1159) which were operated by a number of companies and private individuals as well as by government agencies including various military entities and NASA. In addition, the Gulfstream I
Gulfstream I
propjet was operated by several commuter/regional airlines in scheduled passenger services and included a stretched version, being the Gulfstream I-C ( Grumman
Grumman
model G-159C) which could transport 37 passengers. Gulfstream business jets continue to be currently manufactured by Gulfstream Aerospace
Gulfstream Aerospace
which is a wholly owned subsidiary of General Dynamics. Long Island
Long Island
location[edit]

F-14 Tomcat
F-14 Tomcat
at Grumman
Grumman
Memorial Park, Calverton, New York

Grumman's former headquarters in Bethpage, now Altice USA (formerly Cablevision) headquarters

For much of the Cold War period Grumman
Grumman
was the largest corporate employer on Long Island.[citation needed] Grumman's products were considered so reliable and ruggedly built that the company was often referred to as the " Grumman
Grumman
Iron Works".[4] As the company grew, it moved to Valley Stream, New York, then Farmingdale, New York, finally to Bethpage, New York, with the testing and final assembly at the 6,000-acre (24 km2) Naval Weapons Station in Calverton, New York, all located on Long Island. At its peak in 1986 it employed 23,000 people on Long Island[5] and occupied 6,000,000 square feet (560,000 m2) in structures on 105 acres (0.42 km2) it leased from the U.S. Navy in Bethpage.[6] The end of the Cold War at the beginning of the 1990s reduced defense spending and led to a wave of mergers as aerospace companies shrank in number; in 1994 Northrop bought Grumman
Grumman
for $2.1 billion to form Northrop Grumman,[6] after Northrop topped a $1.9 billion offer from Martin Marietta.[7] The new company closed almost all of its facilities on Long Island
Long Island
and converted the Bethpage plant to a residential and office complex, with its headquarters becoming the corporate headquarters for Cablevision and the Calverton plant being turned into a business/industrial complex. Former aircraft hangars have become Grumman
Grumman
Studios, a film and television production center. A portion of the airport property has been used for the Grumman
Grumman
Memorial Park. Northrop Grumman's remaining business at the Bethpage campus is the "Battle Management and Engagement Systems Division", which employs around 2,000 people.[when?][citation needed] Products[edit]

An F-14A Tomcat of VF-84
VF-84
Jolly Rogers, in the old color scheme from the beginning of its service

An A-6E Intruder flying over Spain
Spain
during Exercise Matador

TBF Avenger

Navy Grumman
Grumman
US-2C Tracker

E-2C Hawkeye

F4F-3 Wildcat Bu12297

F9F-7 Cougar Bu130763

Aircraft[edit]

The "Cats"

Grumman
Grumman
F4F Wildcat Grumman
Grumman
F6F Hellcat Grumman
Grumman
F7F Tigercat Grumman
Grumman
F8F Bearcat Grumman
Grumman
F9F Panther Grumman
Grumman
F9F, F-9 Cougar Grumman
Grumman
XF10F Jaguar Grumman
Grumman
F-11 Tiger Grumman
Grumman
F11F-1F Super Tiger Grumman
Grumman
F-14 Tomcat

Other fighter aircraft

Grumman
Grumman
FF1[2] Grumman
Grumman
F2F[8] Grumman
Grumman
F3F[9] Grumman
Grumman
XF5F Skyrocket Grumman
Grumman
XP-50 General Dynamics- Grumman
Grumman
F-111B Grumman
Grumman
G-118

Amphibious

Columbia XJL Grumman
Grumman
JF Duck[8] Grumman
Grumman
J2F Duck[8] Grumman G-21 Goose
Grumman G-21 Goose
some modified as Super or Turbo Goose Grumman
Grumman
G-44 Widgeon Grumman
Grumman
G-73 Mallard Grumman HU-16 Albatross
Grumman HU-16 Albatross
(Coast Guard UF-1/UF-2, Navy U-16, Civilian G-111) Grumman
Grumman
G-65 Tadpole

Attack

Grumman
Grumman
A-6 Intruder

Bomber

Grumman
Grumman
XSBF Grumman
Grumman
TBF Avenger Grumman
Grumman
XTB2F Grumman
Grumman
XTSF

Electronic warfare aircraft

Grumman
Grumman
EA-6B Prowler General Dynamics– Grumman
Grumman
EF-111A Raven

Other aircraft

Grumman
Grumman
AF Guardian Grumman
Grumman
C-1 Trader Grumman
Grumman
E-1 Tracer Grumman
Grumman
S-2 Tracker Grumman
Grumman
E-2 Hawkeye Grumman
Grumman
C-2 Greyhound Grumman
Grumman
OV-1 Mohawk Grumman
Grumman
X-29

Civilian

Grumman
Grumman
Gulfstream I Grumman
Grumman
Gulfstream II Grumman American AA-1
Grumman American AA-1
(1971–76) Grumman
Grumman
American AA-1B Trainer (1971–76) Grumman American AA-5
Grumman American AA-5
Traveler (1972–75) Grumman
Grumman
American AA-5A Cheetah (1976–79) Grumman
Grumman
American AA-5B Tiger (1975–79) Grumman
Grumman
American Cougar Grumman
Grumman
Ag Cat Grumman
Grumman
Kitten

Spacecraft[edit]

Space

Apollo Lunar Module

Other products[edit]

Grumman
Grumman
Olson built aluminum truck bodies, known as stepvans. Under the Grumman
Grumman
Olson brand it made the P-600 and P-6800 step vans for UPS. Grumman
Grumman
manufactured fire engines under the name Firecat and aerial tower trucks under the Aerialcat name. The company entered the fire apparatus business in 1976 with its purchase of Howe Fire Apparatus and ended operations in 1992. Grumman
Grumman
canoes were developed in 1944 as World War II
World War II
was winding down. Company executive William Hoffman used the company's aircraft aluminum to replace the traditional wood design. The canoes had a reputation for being sturdier, lighter and stronger than their wood counterparts and had a considerable market share. Grumman
Grumman
moved its boat making division to Marathon, New York in 1952.

Outboard Marine Corp. bought the division in 1990 and produced the last Grumman-brand canoe in 1996. Shortly thereafter former Grumman executives formed the Marathon Boat Group to produce the canoes. In 2000 the Group worked out an agreement with Northrop Grumman
Northrop Grumman
to sell the canoes using Grumman
Grumman
name and logo.[10][11] The Grumman
Grumman
canoes with its logo are used in the film Deliverance.

After Grumman
Grumman
took over Howe Fire Apparatus, the fire trucks were rebranded Grumman. Grumman
Grumman
sport boat Grumman-Flxible 870 transit buses (1978–1982) Ben Franklin (PX-15), a science submarine Grumman LLV
Grumman LLV
postal vehicle widely used by the United States Postal Service and Canada Post In 1984 Grumman
Grumman
leased the first superconducting MRI in Manhattan to East River Medical Imaging then known as S-K Magnetic Resonance Imaging, P.C.

United States Postal Service
United States Postal Service
Grumman
Grumman
LLV

1988 Grumman
Grumman
Firecat, Santiago de Chile
Santiago de Chile
FD, 2004

Grumman
Grumman
Olson UPS truck

Grumman
Grumman
Kabmaster Hostess Delivery truck

References[edit] Notes[edit]

^ "Air Warfare". An International Encyclopedia, Volume Two, M-Z, Volume 1, pp. 270–271. ^ a b c d e f Jordan, Corey C. "Grumman's Ascendency: Chapter One." Planes and Pilots Of World War 2, 2000. Retrieved: July 22, 2011. ^ Peck, Merton J. & Scherer, Frederic M. The Weapons Acquisition Process: An Economic Analysis (1962) Harvard Business School
Harvard Business School
p.619 ^ Skrula and Gregory 2004 ^ "Long Islanders Shocked by Grumman's Merger." The New York Times, March 8, 1994. ^ a b "Commercial Property/Selling Off Northrop Grumman's Surplus; Cablevision
Cablevision
Takes Last of the Grumman
Grumman
Buildings." The New York Times, December 28, 1997. ^ "Northrop Bests Martin Marietta to Buy Grumman." The New York Times, April 5, 1994. ^ a b c Jordan, Corey C. "Grumman's Ascendency: Chapter Two." Archived March 25, 2012, at the Wayback Machine. Planes and Pilots Of World War 2, 2000. Retrieved: July 22, 2011. ^ Jordan, Corey C. "Grumman's Ascendency: Chapter Three." Planes and Pilots Of World War 2, 2000. Retrieved: July 22, 2011. ^ "Paddling a Canoe
Canoe
to Success." Newsday. Retrieved: May 15, 2009. ^ "Marathon BoatGroup: About Us." Marathonboat.com. Retrieved: May 15, 2009.

Bibliography[edit]

Ferguson, Robert G. "One Thousand Planes a Day: Ford, Grumman, General Motors and the Arsenal of Democracy." History and Technology, Volume 21, Issue 2, 2005. Fetherston, Drew. "Pioneers on the Runway: Raising Grumman." LI History.com, Grumman
Grumman
Park. Retrieved: March 18, 2009. Kessler, Pamela. "Leroy Grumman, Sky King." The Washington Post (Weekend), October 11, 1985. O'Leary, Michael, ed. "Leroy Grumman." Air Classics, Volume 19, no. 2, February 1983, pp. 27–29. Skurla, George M. and William H. Gregory. Inside the Iron Works: How Grumman's Glory Days Faded. Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 2004. ISBN 978-1-55750-329-9. Tillman, Barrett. Hellcat: The F6F in World War II. Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 2001. ISBN 0-87021-265-6. Thruelsen, Richard. The Grumman
Grumman
Story. New York: Praeger Publishers, Inc., 1976. ISBN 0-275-54260-2. Treadwell, Terry. Ironworks: Grumman's Fighting Aeroplanes. Shrewsbury, UK: Airlife Publishers, 1990. ISBN 1-85310-070-6.

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Grumman
Grumman
Aerospace Corporation.

International Directory of Company Histories, Vol. 11. St. James Press, 1995 (via fundinguniverse.com) Grumman
Grumman
profile on Aerofiles.com Grumman
Grumman
Memorial Park History Center WW2DB: Grumman
Grumman
aircraft of WW2 1994 Aerial photograph of Bethpage Headquarters, including intact runways Grumman
Grumman
Firecat on multimedia gallery Archived 2007 Newsday article on decline of Grumman

v t e

Grumman
Grumman
and Northrop Grumman
Northrop Grumman
aircraft

Manufacturer designations

G-1 (floats only) G-2 (floats only) G-3 G-4 G-5 G-6 G-7 G-8 G-9 G-10 G-11 G-12 G-13 G-14 G-15 G-16 G-17 G-18 G-19 G-20 G-21 G-22 G-23 G-24 G-25 G-26 G-27 G-29 G-30 G-31 G-32 G-33 G-34 G-35 G-36 G-37 G-38 G-39 G-40 G-41 G-42 G-43 G-44 G-45 G-46 G-47 G-48 G-49 G-50 G-51 G-52 G-53 G-54 G-55 G-56 G-57 G-58 G-59 G-60 G-61 G-62 G-63 G-64 G-65 G-66 G-67 G-68 G-69 G-70 G-71 G-72 G-73 G-74 G-75 G-76 G-77 G-78 G-79 G-80 G-81 G-82 G-83 G-84 G-85 G-86 G-87 G-88 G-89 G-90 G-91 G-92 G-93 G-94 G-96 G-97 G-98 G-98J G-99 G-100 G-101 G-102 G-103 G-104 G-105 G-106 G-107 G-108 G-109 G-110 G-111 G-112 G-113 G-114 G-115 G-116 G-117 G-118 G-119 G-120 G-121 G-122 G-123 G-124 G-125 G-126 G-127 G-128 G-132 G-134 G-159 G-164 G-191 G-231 G-234 G-251 G-262 G-303 G-426 G-712 G-1128 G-1159 Model 400

By role

Piston fighters

FF F2F F3F F4F XF5F XP-50 F6F XP-65 F7F F8F

Jet fighters

F9F-1 to -5 F9F-6 to -8 F-9 XF10F F11F/F-11/F11F-1F G-118 F-111B F-14

Bombers

B-2 B-21

Attack/Patrol

TBF XTSF TB2F AF S-2 A-6

Recon/Scouts

SF XSBF E-1 OV-1 EA-6 E-2

Utility/Transports

UC-103 JF J2F OA-12 JRF J3F OA-9 OA-13 OA-14/J4F U-16/JR2F/UF C-1 C-2

Civil aircraft

Mallard Ag Cat Kitten Tadpole Gulfstream I Gulfstream II

Others

Apollo Lunar Module E-8 E-10 EF-111 Q-4/C Q-8/C Q-180 X-29 X-47A X-47B X-47C Bat Firebird Switchblade

By name

Ag Cat Albatross Avenger Bat Bearcat Cougar Duck Fifi Firebird Fire Scout Global Hawk Goose Greyhound Guardian Gulfhawk III Gulfstream I Gulfstream II Hawkeye Hellcat Intruder Jaguar Joint STARS Kitten Mallard Mohawk Panther Pegasus Prowler Raider Skyrocket Spirit Super Tiger Switchblade Tadpole Tiger Tigercat Tomcat Tracer Tracker Trader Triton Wildcat Widgeon

v t e

American Aviation
American Aviation
light aircraft

Aircraft

AA-1 AA-2 AA-5 AG-5 GA-7

Companies

American Aviation Grumman
Grumman
American Gulfstream American American General Tiger Aircraft True Flight

v t e

Automotive industry
Automotive industry
in the United States

Automotive industry Economy of the United States Transportation in the United States

American vehicle manufacturers (list)

AGCO

Challenger Tractor Massey Ferguson

AM General American Expedition Vehicles American Growler Amp Electric Vehicles Anteros Coachworks Arcimoto Armour Group, Inc. ATK motorcycles Aurica Motors Autocar Blue Bird Boulder Electric Vehicle Brammo Brunton Stalker Caterpillar FCA US

Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram

CNH Industrial

Case CE Case IH

Commuter Cars Cushman Cummins Cycle-Scoot DeLorean Chenowth Racing Products Eagle Bus Environmental Performance Vehicles Equus Elio Motors Faraday Future Fisker Inc. Ford

Lincoln SVT

General Dynamics
General Dynamics
Land Systems General Motors

Buick Cadillac Chevrolet GMC

Gillig Glaval Bus GreenTech Harley-Davidson HDT Global Hennessey HME John Deere Karma Automotive Legacy Nikola Local Motors Lockheed Martin Lingenfelter Lenco Industries Mack Trucks Millennium Luxury Coaches Morgan Olson Mosler Automotive MotoCzysz Motor Coach Industries Myers Motors Navistar International

IC Bus International

Nissan Commercial Vehicles Oshkosh

Pierce

Paccar

Kenworth Peterbilt

Panoz Phoenix Motorcars Polaris Industries

Global Electric Motorcars Indian Victory

Proterra REV Group

Champion Bus Collins ElDorado National E-One Fleetwood Goshen Coach Holiday Rambler Laymor Wheeled Coach

Saleen Shelby American SSC North America Starcraft Bus Superformance Tesla Textron Marine & Land Systems Trans Tech TranStar Racing Ultimaster VIA Motors Visionary Vehicles Wheego Electric Cars ZAP Zimmer Motorcars

Foreign vehicle manufacturers with US operations

AB Volvo USA BMW US Manufacturing Company BYD Auto
BYD Auto
America Changan USA Daimler North America

Daimler Trucks North America

Thomas Freightliner Western Star

FAW Group
FAW Group
USA Fiat USA FHI America Honda of America

Acura

Hyundai USA Isuzu America Kia Motors America Mazda
Mazda
America Mitsubishi Motors North America New Flyer Industries(1)

New Flyer NABI Motor Coach Industries

Nissan USA Peugeot
Peugeot
USA SAIC Motor
SAIC Motor
USA Suzuki
Suzuki
America Toyota Motor Sales, U.S.A.

Lexus Scion

Volkswagen Group of America Wanxiang America

Active factories

BMW US Manufacturing Company Fiat Chrysler
Chrysler
factories Ford factories General Motors
General Motors
factories Honda of America factories Hyundai Motor Manufacturing Alabama Kia Motors Manufacturing Georgia Mercedes-Benz U.S. International Nissan North America Subaru of Indiana Automotive, Inc. Tesla Factory Toyota Motor Engineering & Manufacturing North America Volkswagen Chattanooga Assembly Plant

Components companies

Allison BorgWarner Caterpillar Cummins Delphi Detroit Diesel Ingersoll Rand Eaton Firestone Goodyear Nexteer Remy International Timken Torrington Visteon

Insurance and finance companies

Allstate

Ecompass Insurance Esurance

Ally Financial Erie Insurance Group Farmers Insurance Group

21st Century Insurance Farmers Insurance

GM Financial GMAC Insurance Kemper Direct Progressive Safe Auto State Farm

Design studios

Calty Design Research Designworks

By state

Massachusetts

Former manufacturers(2)

Coda FMC

Defunct vehicle manufacturers

Allis-Chalmers American Austin American LaFrance American Motors

Hudson

Essex Terraplane

Nash Rambler

Armor Holdings Armored Motor Car Company Auburn Automobile Avanti Motor Corporation Avery BMC Carbon Motors Corporation Checker Motors Corporation Clydesdale Motor Truck Company Commonwealth Cord Case CNH Global Duesenberg Durant

Flint Locomobile Mason Rugby Star

Excalibur FCA US

Eagle Plymouth Street & Racing Technology (still used as a trim for dodge vehicles)

Fiberfab Fitch Four Drive Fisker Automotive Fisker Coachbuild Force Protection Ford

Continental Edsel Mercury

General Motors

Cartercar Elmore GM Diesel Geo Hummer LaSalle Marquette McLaughlin Oakland Oldsmobile Pontiac Saturn Scripps-Booth Sheridan Viking Yellow Coach

Green Vehicles Grumman Henney International Harvester Jeffery Kaiser-Frazer

Allstate Frazer Henry J Kaiser Willys

Marathon Motor Works Marmon

Roosevelt

Marvel Motors Matbro Mercer Monaco Coach Muntz Car Company North American Bus Industries Oliver Farm Equipment Packard Peerless Motor Company Pierce-Arrow Sebring Vanguard Sterling Trucks Studebaker

Erskine Rockne

Stutz Twentieth Century Motor Car Corporation United Defense VL White Wildfire

Defunct factories

Brampton Assembly (AMC) Diamond-Star Motors Fiat Chrysler
Chrysler
factories closed Ford factories closed General Motors
General Motors
factories closed NUMMI Packard
Packard
Automotive Plant Volkswagen Westmoreland Assembly

Related topics

AAA Chicago Auto Show Interstate Highway System National Highway Traffic Safety Administration New York International Auto Show North American International Auto Show SAE International

(1)Although New Flyer is Canadian, their Subsidiaries, NABI and Motor Coach Industries, are headquartered in the U.S.

(2)Former meaning the company is no longer in the automotive manufacturing business

.