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Ground beef, minced beef or beef mince is beef that has been finely chopped with a knife or a meat grinder (American English) or mincing machine (British English). It is used in many recipes including hamburgers and spaghetti Bolognese.

It is not th

Ground beef, minced beef or beef mince is beef that has been finely chopped with a knife or a meat grinder (American English) or mincing machine (British English). It is used in many recipes including hamburgers and spaghetti Bolognese.

It is not the same as mincemeat, which is a mixture of chopped dried fruit, distilled spirits, spices and historically (but nowadays rare) minced/ground meat.

Ground beef

In many countries, food laws define specific categories of ground beef and what they can contain. For example, in the United States, beef fat may be added to hamburger but not to ground beef if the meat is ground and packaged at a USDA-inspected plant.[note 1] In the U.S., a maximum of 30% fat by weight is allowed in either hamburger or ground beef. The allowable amount in France is 5 to 20% (15% being used by most food chains). In Germany, regular ground beef may contain up to 15% fat while the special "Tatar" for steak tartare may contain less than 5% fat. Both hamburger and ground beef can have added seasoning, phosphate, extenders, or binders added; but no additional water is permitted. Ground beef is often marketed in a range of different fat contents to match the preferences of customers.

Ground beef is generally made from the less tender and less popular cuts of beef. Trimmings from tender cuts may also be used.[1]

In a study in the U.S. in 2008, eight brands of fast food hamburgers were evaluated for recognizable tissue types using morphological techniques that are commonly used in the evaluation of tissue's histological condition.[2] The study of the eight laboratory specimens found the content of the hamburgers included: