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Ferdinand Lassalle (German: [laˈsal]; 11 April 1825 – 31 August 1864) was a Prussian-German jurist, philosopher, socialist and political activist best remembered as the initiator of the social democratic movement in Germany.[1] “Lassalle was the first man in Germany, the first in Europe, who succeeded in organising a party of socialist action”,[2] or, as Rosa Luxemburg put it: “Lassalle managed to wrestle from history in two years of flaming agitation what needed many decades to come about.”[3] As agitator he coined the terms night-watchman state and iron law of wages.[4]

Statewither away in a future classless society. Instead, Lassalle considered the state as an independent entity, an instrument of justice essential for the achievement of the socialist program.[41]

Iron law of wages

Lassalle considere

Lassalle considered Johann Gottlieb Fichte as "one of the mightiest thinkers of all peoples and ages", praising Fichte's Addresses to the German Nation in a May 1862 speech as "one of the mightiest monuments of fame which our people possesses, and which, in depth and power, far surpass everything of this sort which has been handed down to us from the literature of all time and peoples".[43]

Works