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Christine Marie Evert (born December 21, 1954), known as Chris Evert Lloyd from 1979 to 1987, is a former World No. 1 tennis player from the United States. She won 18 Grand Slam singles championships and three doubles titles. She was the year-ending World No. 1 singles player in 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1980, and 1981. Overall, Evert won 157 singles championships and 32 doubles titles. Evert reached 34 Grand Slam singles finals, more than any other player in the history of professional tennis.[3] She holds the record of most consecutive years (13) to win at least one Grand Slam title.[4] In singles, Evert reached the semifinals or better 52 of the 56 Grand Slams she played, including the semifinals or better of 34 consecutive Grand Slams entered from the 1971 US Open through the 1983 French Open.[5] Evert never lost in the first or second round of a Grand Slam singles tournament and lost in the third round only twice. In Grand Slam women's singles play, Evert won a record seven championships at the French Open
French Open
and a co-record six championships at the US Open (tied with Serena Williams). Evert's career winning percentage in singles matches of 89.97% (1309–146) is the highest in the history of Open Era
Open Era
tennis, for men or women. On clay courts, her career winning percentage in singles matches of 94.55% (382–22) remains a WTA record. Evert served as president of the Women's Tennis
Tennis
Association during eleven calendar years, 1975–76 and 1983–91. She was awarded the Philippe Chatrier award and inducted into the Hall of Fame. In later life Evert was a coach and is now an analyst for ESPN
ESPN
and has a line of tennis and active apparel.

Contents

1 Tennis
Tennis
career

1.1 Rivalries 1.2 Awards and recognitions

2 Personal life 3 Current work 4 Career statistics

4.1 Grand Slam singles tournament timeline 4.2 Records

5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External links

Tennis
Tennis
career[edit]

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See also: Chris Evert's Grand Slam history Evert began taking tennis lessons from her father Jimmy Evert when she was five years old. He was a professional tennis coach who had won the men's singles title at the Canadian Championships in 1947. By 1969 she had become the No. 1 ranked under-14 girl in the United States. Evert played her first senior tournament in that year also, reaching the semifinals in her hometown of Fort Lauderdale, Florida, losing to Mary-Ann Eisel in three sets. (For years, this was the record for the furthest a player had reached in her first senior-level tournament.[citation needed] That record was broken when another Floridian, Jennifer Capriati, reached the final of the tournament in Boca Raton, Florida, in 1990 at the age of 13.) In 1970, Evert won the national sixteen-and-under championship and was invited to play in an eight-player clay court tournament in Charlotte, North Carolina. The 15-year-old Evert defeated Françoise Dürr
Françoise Dürr
in the first round in straight sets before defeating Margaret Court
Margaret Court
7–6, 7–6 in a semifinal. Court was the World No. 1 player and had just won the Grand Slam in singles. These results led to Evert's selection for the U.S. Wightman Cup
Wightman Cup
team, the youngest player ever in the competition.[6] Evert made her Grand Slam tournament debut at age 16 at the 1971 US Open; she received an invitation after winning the national sixteen-and-under championship. After an easy straight-sets win over Edda Buding
Edda Buding
in the first round, she faced the American No. 4 Mary-Ann Eisel in the second round. Evert saved six match points - with Eisel at one stage serving at 6–4, 6–5 (40–0) in the second set - before going on to win 4–6, 7–6, 6–1. She made two further comebacks from a set down, against Dürr and Lesley Hunt, both seasoned professionals, before losing to Billie Jean King
Billie Jean King
in a semifinal in straight sets.[7] This defeat ended a 46-match winning streak built up through a variety of professional and junior tour events.[8] This winning streak included her first matches with and wins over King, Virginia Wade and Betty Stöve. In 1973 Evert was the runner-up at the French Open
French Open
and the Wimbledon Championships. A year later she won both those events during her then-record 55-consecutive-match winning streak, which included eight other tournament wins. She ended the year with a 100–7 match record, winning 16 tournaments including two Grand Slams, having been a finalist in her first Australian Open, and having for a fourth straight year reached the semifinals at the US Open. She was chosen as the year-end number one by the leading tennis experts and authorities of the day - except Bud Collins
Bud Collins
- over her closest rivals, King and Evonne Goolagong, each of whom had six titles including a Grand Slam (King the US Open and Goolagong the Australian Open). At the time, she was engaged to Jimmy Connors, who won the Wimbledon men's singles title that year as media attention surrounded the summer "Love Match" of tennis. They partnered in the mixed doubles event at the 1974 US Open, finishing as runners-up. Their engagement was short-lived as it was called off later that year. However, their on-again-off-again relationship continued over the next couple of years. For the next five years, Evert was the world's No. 1 player. In 1975 she won her second French Open
French Open
and the first of four straight US Open titles by defeating Cawley in a three-set final. Also in November of that year, the official WTA computer ranking system was instituted, with Evert being the first No. 1. In total Evert logged 260 weeks[a] at number one. Until February 2013 she held the record of the oldest woman to be ranked WTA number 1, achieving that distinction after reclaiming the spot for the final time during the week of November 24, 1985, at the age of 30 years and 11 months. This was ten years and three weeks after she had first achieved the number one spot. That record stood for 27 years and 3 months until Williams surpassed it in 2013. The following 1976 season holds a unique distinction for Evert, as this was the only time in her career where she won both Wimbledon and the US Open titles in the same year. She defeated Goolagong Cawley in a thrilling three-set final on the grass and then dismantled her on the clay at Forest Hills, losing just three games. However she lost to Goolagong Cawley in the final of the Virginia Slims Championships.[9] In all, Evert won 26 of 39 matches with Cawley. Her 1976 performance earned her Sports Illustrated's title of Sportsman of the Year, one of only four occasions (King, Arthur Ashe, and Williams) that the award has been given to a tennis player.[10] Evert's domination of the women's game and her calm, steely demeanor on court earned her the nickname of the "Ice Maiden" of tennis.[11] Throughout her career, Evert was ranked number one in the world at the end of seven different years by Tennis
Tennis
Magazine, by World Tennis Magazine and as well as a majority of other major tennis experts from 1974 through 1978, and in 1980 and 1981. In addition Evert had by far the overall best match record in each of those seven years. The years 1977 and 1978 saw Evert continue to dominate the women's game, winning two more US Opens, the final one played at Forest Hills on clay (1977) and the inaugural one on hard courts at Flushing Meadow (1978). She won 18 of 25 tournaments, with a 126–7 match record, failing only once to reach at least the semifinals during that span. Of particular note is that Evert skipped the French Open
French Open
during these years (as well as 1976) to play in King's World TeamTennis. The other noteworthy event was Evert's three-set loss to Wade in the semifinals of the 1977 Wimbledon. It was Wimbledon's centenary year, coinciding with Queen Elizabeth II's Silver Jubilee as monarch. A new rival to Evert's domination of tennis emerged on the scene in the second half of the 1970s in the form of Martina Navratilova. Though frequent doubles partners, and good friends off the court, their fierce on-court rivalry is one of the greatest in tennis history. Evert had the best of their earlier encounters, at one point holding a 30–18 edge. However, in the run-up to the 1982 season, Navratilova overhauled her game and fitness, and upgraded her racquet technology, which allowed her to build a 13-match winning streak that culminated at the 1984 US Open, on what came to be known as Super Saturday. They entered the final with 30 wins apiece. Navratilova overcame a first set deficit and a pro-Evert crowd[citation needed] to win 4–6, 6–4, 6–4. Eventually the rivalry saw a final match record of 43–37 in favor of Navratilova, who also led 14–8 in Grand Slam matches and 10–4 in Grand Slam finals. Though successful on all surfaces, it was on clay courts where Evert was most dominant. Beginning in August 1973 she won 125 consecutive matches on clay, losing only eight sets throughout; a run which continues to stand as the benchmark among both men and women players.[12] The streak was broken on May 12, 1979 in a semifinal of the Italian Open, when Evert lost to Tracy Austin
Tracy Austin
in a third-set tiebreak after Evert lost a game point to go up 5–2 in the final set. Evert said after the match, "Not having the record will take some pressure off me, but I am not glad to have lost it." Evert rebounded with another clay court streak that reached 64 matches (including titles at the 1979 and 1980 French Open) before ending with a semi-final loss to eventual winner Hana Mandlíková
Hana Mandlíková
at the 1981 French Open
French Open
(a record of 189 victories in 191 matches on clay from 1973 to 1981). Hilde Krahwinkel Sperling
Hilde Krahwinkel Sperling
had a similar run of clay court dominance from 1935 through 1939, winning the French Championships in three consecutive years (not playing there the other two years) and incurring only one loss on clay during that 5-year period. Evert's record of seven French Open
French Open
singles titles stood for 27 years until being broken in June 2013 by Rafael Nadal. She still holds the record for female players. She also shares the record for most clay court Grand Slam titles (10 with seven French Opens and all three US Opens played on clay in 1975–77) with Nadal (ten French Opens). Three of her victories came in three-set finals against Navratilova. In 1975 Evert defeated Navratilova to defend her title from the previous year 2–6, 6–2, 6–1. In 1985 Evert prevailed 6–3, 6–7, 7–5, a win that saw her capture the World No. 1 computer ranking for the fifth and final time. For Evert, beating Navratilova in any slam represented beating the best player, which provided her with two of her most satisfying "final time" wins: The 1986 French Open, where at the age of 31 years, she won her last Grand Slam title defeating Navratilova in three sets and the 1988 Australian Open
Australian Open
where she handily dispatched Navratilova in the semifinals in two sets to reach her 34th and last Grand Slam final at age 33. Evert won at least one Grand Slam singles title a year for 13 consecutive years, from 1974 through 1986.[13] During this period Evert did not participate in the Australian Opens held from 1975 to 1980 and in 1983, or the French Opens from 1976 to 1978. The reasons for Evert's non-participation in the Australian Open
Australian Open
during the years of her greatest dominance (she was ranked No.1 in the world five of the six years she was absent from the event between 1975 and 1980) was the relative decline in the status of this Grand Slam tournament during that period, so that the top American and European players tended to stay away. Evert's absence from the French Open
French Open
in 1976, 1977 and 1978 reflected the allure of World Team Tennis
Tennis
and the generally lesser significance that the top players attached to the traditional Slam events in the early years of the professional era. Between September 1971 (her Grand Slam debut at the US Open) and June 1983 (her twelfth visit to The Championships Wimbledon), Evert never failed to reach at least the semi-finals of the 34 Grand Slam singles events she entered. This string, however, was broken in the third round at Wimbledon in 1983 when the All England Club
All England Club
refused Evert's request to delay her match with Kathy Jordan to recover from food poisoning. This defeat also ended her attempt to be the holder of all four Grand Slam singles titles simultaneously, as Evert was then holder of the '82 Australian, U.S., and the '83 French titles. In 56 Grand Slam singles events entered from 1971 to 1989, Evert fell short of the semifinals a mere four times (1983 Wimbledon 3rd round; 1987 US Open quarterfinal; 1988 French Open
French Open
3rd round; 1989 US Open quarterfinal). In total, of the record 34 Grand Slam finals reached, Evert won 18 Grand Slam singles titles: seven at the French Open
French Open
(record for female), six at the US Open (an open era record, male or female, tied with Serena Williams), three at Wimbledon, and two at the Australian Open (both on grass). In addition, Evert won three Grand Slam doubles titles, at the French in 1974 with Olga Morozova, there in 1975 with Navratilova, and again with Navratilova at Wimbledon in 1976. Evert's overall record in Grand Slam events was 297–38 (.887): 72–6 at the French Open, 94–15 at Wimbledon, 101–13 at the US Open (the record for most singles match wins in history, male or female), and 30–4 at the Australian Open
Australian Open
(never failing to reach the final). Evert faced Navratilova in the final of 14 Grand Slam events, with Evert losing 10 of those encounters. (Navratilova defeated Evert at least once in the final of each of the four Grand Slam events, whereas three of Evert's four wins were at the French Open
French Open
and the fourth was at the Australian Open.) In their eight semifinal clashes, their record stands at four wins apiece. Evert defeated Navratilova in the semi-finals of the US Open (1975), Wimbledon (1976 and 1980), and the Australian Open
Australian Open
(1988) but lost to Navratilova in the semifinals of the US Open (1981), Wimbledon (1987 and 1988), and the French Open (1987). In those semi-final rounds, each player won twice on grass, once on hard, and once on clay. Evert played a reduced schedule in 1989 and retired from the professional tour after the US Open.[14][15] During her career, she amassed 18 Grand Slam singles titles (at the time, an open era record, male or female), won 154 singles titles (at the time, the record for male or female) and 32 doubles titles, she held the most. Her record in finals was 157–72 (.686). She reached the semifinals in 273 of the 303 tournaments she entered. Evert won the WTA Tour Championships four times and helped the United States
United States
win the Fed Cup
Fed Cup
eight times. Evert's last match was a 6–3, 6–2 win over Conchita Martínez
Conchita Martínez
in the final of the 1989 Fed Cup. Rivalries[edit] Main article: Evert–Navratilova rivalry During her career versus selected rivals, Evert was: 40–6 against Virginia Wade, 37–43 against Martina Navratilova, 26–13 against Evonne Goolagong
Evonne Goolagong
Cawley, 24–0 against Virginia Ruzici, 23–1 against Sue Barker, 22–0 against Betty Stöve, 22–1 against Rosemary Casals, 21–7 against Hana Mandlíková, 20–1 against Wendy Turnbull, 19–7 against Billie Jean King
Billie Jean King
(winning the last 11 matches with a loss of only two sets), 19–3 against Pam Shriver, 18–2 against Kerry Melville Reid, 17–2 against Manuela Maleeva-Fragniere, 17–2 against Helena Suková, 17–3 against Andrea Jaeger, 16–3 against Dianne Fromholtz Balestrat, 15–0 against Olga Morozova, 13–0 against Françoise Dürr, 9–4 against Margaret Court, 8–9 against Tracy Austin, 7–0 against Mary Joe Fernandez, 6–3 against Gabriela Sabatini, 6–5 against Nancy Richey Gunter (winning the last 6 matches), 6–8 against Steffi Graf
Steffi Graf
(losing the last eight matches) and 2–1 against Monica Seles. Awards and recognitions[edit] Evert was voted the Associated Press Female Athlete of the Year on four occasions and was the first female athlete to be Sports Illustrated magazine's sole recipient of "Sportswoman of the Year" award in 1976.[10][16] In April 1985 she was voted the "Greatest Woman Athlete of the Last 25 Years" by the Women's Sports Foundation. Evert served as President of the Women's Tennis
Tennis
Association during 1975–76, and from 1983 to 1991.[17] In 1995 she was the fourth player ever to be unanimously elected into the International Tennis Hall of Fame
International Tennis Hall of Fame
following a worldwide ballot of 185 sports journalists whilst 1999 saw Evert rated No. 50 among ESPN's Greatest North American athletes of the 20th century.[11][18] In 2005, TENNIS Magazine
TENNIS Magazine
named her fourth on its list of 40 Greatest Players of the TENNIS Era.[19] In 2012, Tennis
Tennis
Channel conducted a poll of players and experts to determine the 100 greatest players of all-time, in which Evert ranked ninth overall, and fourth highest among women (finishing behind Graf, Navratilova, and Court in that order.) In June 2013 Evert was awarded a special merit from the International Tennis
Tennis
Hall of Fame. They presented her their gold ring in recognition of her outstanding achievements both on and off the tennis court.[citation needed] Personal life[edit] Evert was born in 1954 in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, to Colette (née Thompson) and Jimmy Evert,[20] and raised in a devout Catholic family.[21] She is a 1973 graduate of St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale. Jimmy was a professional tennis coach, and tennis was a way of life in his family. Chris and her sister Jeanne became professional tennis players; their brother John played tennis on scholarship at the University of Alabama and later at Vanderbilt University, and brother Drew had a tennis scholarship to Auburn University. Youngest sister Clare played scholarship tennis at Southern Methodist University. Chris, John and sisters Jeanne and Clare all won titles at the prestigious Junior Orange Bowl in Florida. Before she won her first Grand Slam event, Evert signed a contract with Puritan Fashions to endorse a line of sportswear.[22] Company president Carl Rosen thought so highly of her that he named a yearling racehorse in her honor. The horse Chris Evert
Chris Evert
went on to win the 1974 U.S. Filly Triple Crown, be voted the Eclipse Award for Outstanding 3-Year-Old Filly, and was inducted into the National Museum of Racing and Hall of Fame. In the 1970s, Evert's romance with the top men's player Jimmy Connors captured the public's imagination, particularly after they both won the 1974 singles titles at Wimbledon. Evert and Connors also occasionally played mixed doubles together. In 1974, they were the runners-up at the U.S. Open. They became engaged when she was 19 and a wedding was planned for November 8, 1974. The romance did not last and the wedding was called off. In May 2013, Connors wrote in his autobiography that Evert was pregnant with their child and she unilaterally decided to terminate the pregnancy. Evert replied that she was "extremely disappointed that he [Connors] used the book to misrepresent a private matter".[23][24][25]

John Lloyd and Evert in Fort Lauderdale, circa 1978

In 1979 Evert married the British tennis player John Lloyd and changed her name to Chris Evert
Chris Evert
Lloyd. After her affair with British singer and actor Adam Faith, the couple separated,[26][27][28] but reconciled and chronicled their marriage in a biography Lloyd On Lloyd co-authored by Carol Thatcher.[29] The couple divorced in April 1987.[30] During the 1987 U.S. Open, her diamond line bracelet fell off onto the court.[31][32] She stated about this, "I dropped my tennis bracelet", and since then diamond line bracelets have been called tennis bracelets.[31][32] In 1988 Evert married two-time Olympic downhill skier Andy Mill. They have three sons: Alexander (b. 1991), Nicholas (b. 1994) and Colton (b. 1996). On November 13, 2006 Evert filed for divorce. The divorce was finalized on December 4, 2006 with Evert paying Mill a settlement of U.S. $7 million in cash and securities.[33] Evert left Mill to marry her third husband, Australian golfer Greg Norman, on June 28, 2008 in the Bahamas.[34] On October 2, 2009 they announced they were separating after only 15 months of marriage. Their divorce became final on December 8, 2009.[35][36] Current work[edit] Evert operates a tennis academy bearing her name in Boca Raton, Florida and helps coach the Saint Andrew's School's high school tennis team. She contributes to Tennis
Tennis
magazine, of which she is also publisher. In June 2011, she joined ESPN
ESPN
as a tennis commentator for Grand Slam tournaments. In 2015, she launched a line of tennis and active apparel in collaboration with Tail Activewear called Chrissie by Tail.[37] Career statistics[edit] Main article: Chris Evert
Chris Evert
career statistics Grand Slam singles tournament timeline[edit]

Key

W  F  SF QF #R RR Q# A NH

(W) Won; (F) finalist; (SF) semifinalist; (QF) quarterfinalist; (#R) rounds 4, 3, 2, 1; (RR) round-robin stage; (Q#) qualification round; (A) absent; (NH) not held.

Tournament 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 Career SR W-L

French Open A A F W W A A A W W SF SF W F W W SF 3R A 7 / 13 72–6

Wimbledon A SF F W SF W SF F F F W F 3R F F SF SF SF SF 3 / 18 94–15

US Open SF SF SF SF W W W W F W SF W F F SF SF QF SF QF 6 / 19 101–12

Australian Open A A A F A A A A A A A F W A W F NH A F A 2 / 6 29–4

SR 0 / 1 0 / 2 0 / 3 2 / 4 2 / 3 2 / 2 1 / 2 1 / 2 1 / 3 2 / 3 1 / 4 2 / 4 1 / 3 1 / 4 1 / 4 1 / 3 0 / 3 0 / 4 0 / 2 18 / 56 296–37

Year End Ranking

3 3 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 10 [A]

[A] Evert retired in September 1989 after playing in the US Open, at which time she was ranked world No.4.

Records[edit]

These records were attained in Open Era
Open Era
of tennis. Records in bold indicate peerless achievements. As Evert elected not to participate in a number of Grand Slam tournaments, the term "consecutive" is inexact. In 19 seasons of professional tennis, Evert competed in all four Grand Slam tournaments in the same year only six times.

Time span Selected Grand Slam tournament records Players matched

1973 French Open
French Open
— 1988 Australian Open 34 finals overall Stands alone

1971 US Open — 1983 French Open 34 consecutive semifinals in tournaments played*[a] Stands alone

1974 French Open
French Open
— 1986 French Open 13 consecutive years of winning 1+ title Stands alone

1974 French Open
French Open
— 1981 Wimbledon 3 different Grand Slam titles won without losing a set Steffi Graf Lindsay Davenport Serena Williams

1984 French Open
French Open
— 1984 Australian Open Reached all four finals in a calendar year Margaret Court Martina Navratilova Steffi Graf Monica Seles Martina Hingis Justine Henin

1971 US Open — 1989 US Open Reached 52 semi-finals (92.8%) and 54 quarterfinals (96.4%) out of 56 Grand Slams entered Stands alone

1971 US Open — 1989 US Open Only player to reach singles semi-final or better in each of first six Majors entered[b] Stands alone

1974 Australian Open
Australian Open
— 1985 US Open Only player to reach singles semi-finals of all four Majors in the same calendar year five times Stands alone

1973 French Open
French Open
— 1988 Australian Open Only player to reach five consecutive finals of each Major Stands alone

1976 Wimbledon — 1976 US Open 100% (13–0) match winning percentage in 1 season Margaret Court Billie Jean King Steffi Graf Monica Seles Serena Williams

Grand Slam tournaments Time Span Records at each Grand Slam tournament Players matched

French Open 1974–1986 7 titles overall Stands alone

French Open 1973–1986 9 finals overall Steffi Graf

French Open 1983–1986 four consecutive finals Martina Navratilova Steffi Graf

Wimbledon 1973, 1978–1980, 1982, 1984, 1985 7 runner-up finishes Stands alone

US Open 1975–1982 6 titles overall[38] Serena Williams

US Open 1975–1978 Four consecutive titles[38] Stands alone

US Open 1975–1979 31 consecutive match wins[39] Stands alone

US Open 1975–1979 46 consecutive sets won[39] Stands alone

US Open 1975–1977 Won US Open on clay Stands alone

US Open 1975–1978 Only female player to win titles on two different surfaces Stands alone

US Open 1975–1984 9 finals overall[39] Stands alone

US Open 1975–1980 6 consecutive finals[39] Stands alone

US Open 1971–1986 16 consecutive semi-finals[39] Stands alone

US Open 1971–1989 101 match wins[39] Stands alone

US Open 1976–1978 3 titles won without losing a set Serena Williams

US Open 1971–1989 89.38% (101–12) match winning percentage[39] Stands alone

Australian Open 1984, 1988 Won title on grass and reached final on hard Stands alone

Australian Open 1974–1988 14 year gap between first and last finals Stands alone

Time span Other selected records Players matched

1971–1988 122 titles outdoor (Open era) Stands alone

1971–1988 70 clay court titles (Open era) Stands alone

1974–1979 125 consecutive clay court match victories [c] Stands alone

1972–1988 17 consecutive years ranked inside the top 3 Stands alone

1972–1989 94.28% (316–20) clay court match percentage [b] Stands alone

1971–1984 First player to reach 1000 career match wins[b] Stands alone

1971–1989 First player to reach 150 career tournament wins [b] Stands alone

1971–1976 First female to reach one million dollars in career prize money Stands alone

See also[edit]

Tennis
Tennis
portal

WTA Tour records List of WTA number 1 ranked players List of female tennis players List of tennis rivalries Tennis
Tennis
records of the Open Era
Open Era
- Women's Singles Overall tennis records - Womens's Singles Luxembourgian American Performance timelines for all female tennis players who reached at least one Grand Slam final

Notes[edit]

^ Fourth all-time behind Steffi Graf
Steffi Graf
(377), Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
(332), and Serena Williams
Serena Williams
(309).

a Evert's consecutive Grand Slam semifinals record was attained in non-consecutive Grand Slam tournaments; she skipped 14 Grand Slam tournaments during her streak. Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
holds the all-time consecutive Grand Slam semifinals record at 19. b Evert reach the semi-finals or better in her first 6 Australian Opens, 12 French Opens, 11 Wimbledons, and 16 US Opens. All-time record for both male and female players. c This is the all-time record for consecutive match victories on a single surface for both male and female players.

References[edit]

^ " Chris Evert
Chris Evert
1980-1989". Florida Memory: State Library and Archives of Florida. Retrieved 12 July 2017.  ^ Sarni, Jim (March 22, 1987). "Evert Out To End Drought At Dallas". The Sun-Sentinel. Retrieved September 28, 2014.  ^ "Women with most tennis Grand Slam finals appearances". Retrieved June 6, 2012.  ^ " Chris Evert
Chris Evert
Fast Facts". CNN.  ^ " Chris Evert
Chris Evert
WTA Player Profile". Archived from the original on June 13, 2012. Retrieved June 6, 2012.  ^ Johnette Howard (2005). The Rivals. Yellow Jersey Press. ISBN 0-224-07505-5 ^ Steve Tignor (March 5, 2015). "1971: Chris Evert
Chris Evert
reaches U.S. Open semis at 16, becomes national sensation". Tennis.com.  ^ Matthews, Glenna (2000). American Women's History : A Student Companion. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 112–113. ISBN 978-0195113174.  ^ Joe Jares (April 26, 1976). "A net gain for concentration". Sports Illustrated. Vol. 44 no. 17. pp. 28–30, 33.  ^ a b Sarah Pileggi. "1976 Sportsman of the Year". Sports Illustrated. 45 (25). Retrieved January 13, 2016.  ^ a b Larry Schwartz. "Evert: grit, grace and glamour". ESPN. Retrieved June 5, 2007.  ^ "Chrissie The Great: Match Results and Records". Chrisevert.net. Archived from the original on July 22, 2011. Retrieved May 17, 2011.  ^ Ed McGrogan (December 15, 2010). "Do these tennis streaks compare to Favre?". ESPN.  ^ Peter Alfano (January 28, 1989). "Evert's retirement plan includes a cutback in her schedule". The New York Times.  ^ Robin Finn (September 6, 1989). "Evert bows out as Garrison prevails, 7-6, 6-2". The New York Times.  ^ " Chris Evert
Chris Evert
to Replace Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
at Gibson-Baldwin Grand Slam Jam". University of Texas Frank Erwin Center. April 14, 2004. Retrieved June 5, 2007.  ^ " International Tennis Hall of Fame
International Tennis Hall of Fame
profile". International Tennis Hall of Fame. Archived from the original on March 30, 2010. Retrieved June 5, 2007.  ^ Larry Schwartz (January 23, 1999). "No. 50: Chris Evert". ESPN. Retrieved June 5, 2007.  ^ Peter Bodo. "40 Greatest Players of the Tennis
Tennis
Era (1–4)". TENNIS Magazine. Archived from the original on August 14, 2009. Retrieved June 5, 2007.  ^ "Family tree of Chris Evert". Freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com. Retrieved May 17, 2011.  ^ " Tennis
Tennis
great Chris Evert
Chris Evert
finds new life on the court". The Washington Post.  ^ Judy Klemesrud (January 13, 1973). " Chris Evert
Chris Evert
Tennis
Tennis
Togs: Netting a Bundle at Age 18". The New York Times. p. 18.  ^ Jimmy, Connors (2013). The Outsider. New York City, NY: Bantam/HarperCollins. pp. 132–133. ISBN 9780593069271.  ^ Jimmy, Connors. "Today Show Interview". NBC News Today Show. Retrieved 6 September 2013.  ^ Chase, Chris (May 2, 2013). " Jimmy Connors
Jimmy Connors
implies Chris Evert
Chris Evert
was pregnant with his child". USA Today. Retrieved 6 September 2013.  ^ Hamilton, Fiona (March 10, 2003). "Adam Faith". The Times. London, UK.  ^ "ESPN.com: Evert: grit, grace and glamour". Espn.go.com. Retrieved 2014-06-30.  ^ Reed, Susan (1984-02-20). "The Evert Lloyds: Advantage, Adam Faith". People.com. Retrieved 2014-06-30.  ^ Lloyd on Lloyd. Chris Evert
Chris Evert
& John Lloyd with Carol Thatcher. Beaufort Books 1986. ISBN 978-0-8253-0374-6 ^ Dave Scheiber (May 11, 1978). "Turning pain into gain". Sports Illustrated. Vol. 66 no. 19. pp. 93–94.  ^ a b Carolyn Williams. "Why Are Tennis
Tennis
Bracelets Called Tennis Bracelets?". Livestrong.Com. Retrieved 2017-12-18.  ^ a b "Love, Diamonds". Coronet Diamonds. 2014-06-20. Retrieved 2017-12-18.  ^ Sun-Sentinel.com Archived December 6, 2006, at the Wayback Machine. Chris Evert
Chris Evert
divorce calls for tennis great to pay hubby $7 million, December 5, 2006. ^ Wihlborg, Ulrica (June 28, 2008). " Chris Evert
Chris Evert
and Greg Norman
Greg Norman
Wed in Bahamas". People. Retrieved May 17, 2011.  ^ Steve Friedman (August 17, 2011). "A Separate Peace". Elle.  ^ "Greg Norman, Chris Evert
Chris Evert
finalize divorce in secret". Reuters. January 12, 2010.  ^ " Chris Evert
Chris Evert
goes for another win, off the court". Retrieved September 9, 2016.  ^ a b "US Open Most Championship Titles Record Book" (PDF). US Open. Archived from the original (PDF) on September 13, 2011. Retrieved August 26, 2012.  ^ a b c d e f g "US Open Singles Record Book" (PDF). US Open. Archived from the original (PDF) on September 1, 2012. Retrieved August 26, 2012. 

Further reading[edit]

Amdur, Neil; Evert, Chris (1982). Chrissie, My Own Story. New York: Simon and Schuster. ISBN 0-671-44376-3.  Howard, Johnette (2006). The Rivals: Chris Evert
Chris Evert
vs. Martina Navratilova: Their Epic Duels and Extraordinary Friendship. New York: Broadway. ISBN 0-7679-1885-1.  Wind, Herbert Warren (October 13, 1986). "The Sporting Scene: Mainly about Chris Evert
Chris Evert
Lloyd". The New Yorker. 62 (34): 117–145. 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Chris Evert.

Chris Evert
Chris Evert
at the Women's Tennis
Tennis
Association Chris Evert
Chris Evert
at the Fed Cup
Fed Cup
Chris Evert
Chris Evert
at the International Tennis
Tennis
Federation Chris Evert
Chris Evert
at the International Tennis
Tennis
Hall of Fame

Chris Evert
Chris Evert
(achievement predecessor & successor)

Sporting positions

Preceded by — Evonne Goolagong Martina Navratilova Martina Navratilova Martina Navratilova Tracy Austin Martina Navratilova Martina Navratilova Martina Navratilova World No. 1 November 3, 1975 - April 26, 1976 May 10, 1976 - July 9, 1978 January 14, 1979 - January 27, 1979 February 25, 1979 - April 15, 1979 June 25, 1979 - September 9, 1979 November 18, 1980 - May 2, 1982 May 17, 1982 - June 13, 1982 June 10, 1985 - October 13, 1985 October 28, 1985 - November 24, 1985 Succeeded by Evonne Goolagong Martina Navratilova Martina Navratilova Martina Navratilova Martina Navratilova Martina Navratilova Martina Navratilova Martina Navratilova Martina Navratilova

Awards and achievements

Preceded by — Martina Navratilova ITF World Champion 1978 1980-1981 Succeeded by Martina Navratilova Martina Navratilova

Preceded by Hanni Wenzel United Press International Athlete of the Year 1981 Succeeded by Marita Koch

Preceded by Jack Nicklaus BBC Overseas Sports Personality of the Year 1981 Succeeded by Jimmy Connors

Preceded by Evelyn Ashford Flo Hyman Memorial Award 1990 Succeeded by Diana Golden-Brosnihan

Preceded by Margaret Court Most Career Grand Slam Singles Titles (Open Era) July 4, 1981 – June 8, 1996 (shared w/ Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
from July 7, 1990 – June 8, 1996) Succeeded by Steffi Graf

Chris Evert
Chris Evert
in the Grand Slam Tournaments

v t e

Women's tennis players who won two or more Grand Slam singles titles in one calendar year

Four wins

1953: Maureen Connolly
Maureen Connolly
Brinker 1970: Margaret Court 1988: Steffi Graf

Three wins

1928: Helen Wills
Helen Wills
Moody (FO&WI&US) 1929: Helen Wills
Helen Wills
Moody (FO&WI&US) 1962: Margaret Court
Margaret Court
(AO&FO&US) 1965: Margaret Court
Margaret Court
(AO&WI&US) 1969: Margaret Court
Margaret Court
(AO&FO&US) 1972: Billie Jean King
Billie Jean King
(FO&WI&US) 1973: Margaret Court
Margaret Court
(AO&FO&US) 1983: Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
(AO&WI&US) 1984: Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
(FO&WI&US) 1989: Steffi Graf
Steffi Graf
(AO&WI&US) 1991: Monica Seles
Monica Seles
(AO&FO&US) 1992: Monica Seles
Monica Seles
(AO&FO&US) 1993: Steffi Graf
Steffi Graf
(FO&WI&US) 1995: Steffi Graf
Steffi Graf
(FO&WI&US) 1996: Steffi Graf
Steffi Graf
(FO&WI&US) 1997: Martina Hingis
Martina Hingis
(AO&WI&US) 2002: Serena Williams
Serena Williams
(FO&WI&US) 2015: Serena Williams
Serena Williams
(AO&FO&WI)

Two wins

1925: Suzanne Lenglen
Suzanne Lenglen
(FO&WI) 1927: Helen Wills
Helen Wills
Moody (WI&US) 1930: Helen Wills
Helen Wills
Moody (FO&WI) 1931: Cilly Aussem
Cilly Aussem
(FO&WI) 1932: Helen Wills
Helen Wills
Moody (FO&WI) 1939: Alice Marble
Alice Marble
(WI&US) 1946: Pauline Betz
Pauline Betz
Addie (WI&US) 1949: Margaret Osborne duPont
Margaret Osborne duPont
(FO&US) 1950: Louise Bough Clapp (AO&WI) 1952: Maureen Connolly
Maureen Connolly
Brinker (WI&US) 1954: Maureen Connolly
Maureen Connolly
Brinker (FO&WI) 1956: Shirley Fry Irvin
Shirley Fry Irvin
(WI&US) 1957: Althea Gibson
Althea Gibson
(WI&US) 1958: Althea Gibson
Althea Gibson
(WI&US) 1959: Maria Bueno
Maria Bueno
(WI&US) 1960: Darlene Hard (FO&US) 1963: Margaret Court
Margaret Court
(AO&WI) 1964: Margaret Court
Margaret Court
(AO&FO) 1964: Maria Bueno
Maria Bueno
(WI&US) 1967: Billie Jean King
Billie Jean King
(WI&US) 1968: Billie Jean King
Billie Jean King
(AO&WI) 1971: Evonne Goolagong Cawley
Evonne Goolagong Cawley
(FO&WI) 1974: Chris Evert
Chris Evert
(FO&WI) 1975: Chris Evert
Chris Evert
(FO&US) 1976: Chris Evert
Chris Evert
(WI&US) 1980: Chris Evert
Chris Evert
(FO&US) 1982: Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
(FO&WI) 1982: Chris Evert
Chris Evert
(AO&US) 1985: Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
(AO&WI) 1986: Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
(WI&US) 1987: Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
(WI&US) 1994: Arantxa Sánchez Vicario
Arantxa Sánchez Vicario
(FO&US) 2000: Venus Williams
Venus Williams
(WI&US) 2001: Jennifer Capriati
Jennifer Capriati
(AO&FO) 2001: Venus Williams
Venus Williams
(WI&US) 2003: Serena Williams
Serena Williams
(AO&WI) 2003: Justine Henin
Justine Henin
(FO&US) 2006: Amélie Mauresmo
Amélie Mauresmo
(AO&WI) 2007: Justine Henin
Justine Henin
(FO&US) 2009: Serena Williams
Serena Williams
(AO&WI) 2010: Serena Williams
Serena Williams
(AO&WI) 2012: Serena Williams
Serena Williams
(WI&US) 2013: Serena Williams
Serena Williams
(FO&US) 2016: Angelique Kerber
Angelique Kerber
(AO&US)

AO=Australian Open, FO=French Open, WI=Wimbledon, US=US Open

v t e

Australian Open
Australian Open
women's singles champions

(1969) Margaret Court (1970) Margaret Court (1971) Margaret Court (1972) Virginia Wade (1973) Margaret Court (1974) Evonne Goolagong (1975) Evonne Goolagong (1976) Evonne Goolagong (1977 (Jan)) Kerry Reid (1977 (Dec)) Evonne Goolagong (1978) Chris O'Neil (1979) Barbara Jordan (1980) Hana Mandlíková (1981) Martina Navratilova (1982) Chris Evert (1983) Martina Navratilova (1984) Chris Evert (1985) Martina Navratilova (1987) Hana Mandlíková (1988) Steffi Graf (1989) Steffi Graf (1990) Steffi Graf (1991) Monica Seles (1992) Monica Seles (1993) Monica Seles (1994) Steffi Graf (1995) Mary Pierce (1996) Monica Seles (1997) Martina Hingis (1998) Martina Hingis (1999) Martina Hingis (2000) Lindsay Davenport (2001) Jennifer Capriati (2002) Jennifer Capriati (2003) Serena Williams (2004) Justine Henin (2005) Serena Williams (2006) Amélie Mauresmo (2007) Serena Williams (2008) Maria Sharapova (2009) Serena Williams (2010) Serena Williams (2011) Kim Clijsters (2012) Victoria Azarenka (2013) Victoria Azarenka (2014) Li Na (2015) Serena Williams (2016) Angelique Kerber (2017) Serena Williams (2018) Caroline Wozniacki

v t e

French Open
French Open
women's singles champions

(1968) Nancy Richey (1969) Margaret Court (1970) Margaret Court (1971) Evonne Goolagong (1972) Billie Jean King (1973) Margaret Court (1974) Chris Evert (1975) Chris Evert (1976) Sue Barker (1977) Mima Jaušovec (1978) Virginia Ruzici (1979) Chris Evert (1980) Chris Evert (1981) Hana Mandlíková (1982) Martina Navratilova (1983) Chris Evert (1984) Martina Navratilova (1985) Chris Evert (1986) Chris Evert (1987) Steffi Graf (1988) Steffi Graf (1989) Arantxa Sánchez (1990) Monica Seles (1991) Monica Seles (1992) Monica Seles (1993) Steffi Graf (1994) Arantxa Sánchez Vicario (1995) Steffi Graf (1996) Steffi Graf (1997) Iva Majoli (1998) Arantxa Sánchez Vicario (1999) Steffi Graf (2000) Mary Pierce (2001) Jennifer Capriati (2002) Serena Williams (2003) Justine Henin (2004) Anastasia Myskina (2005) Justine Henin (2006) Justine Henin (2007) Justine Henin (2008) Ana Ivanovic (2009) Svetlana Kuznetsova (2010) Francesca Schiavone (2011) Li Na (2012) Maria Sharapova (2013) Serena Williams (2014) Maria Sharapova (2015) Serena Williams (2016) Garbiñe Muguruza (2017) Jeļena Ostapenko

v t e

Wimbledon (Open era) ladies' singles champions

(1968) Billie Jean King (1969) Ann Haydon-Jones (1970) Margaret Court (1971) Evonne Goolagong (1972) Billie Jean King (1973) Billie Jean King (1974) Chris Evert (1975) Billie Jean King (1976) Chris Evert (1977) Virginia Wade (1978) Martina Navratilova (1979) Martina Navratilova (1980) Evonne Goolagong (1981) Chris Evert (1982) Martina Navratilova (1983) Martina Navratilova (1984) Martina Navratilova (1985) Martina Navratilova (1986) Martina Navratilova (1987) Martina Navratilova (1988) Steffi Graf (1989) Steffi Graf (1990) Martina Navratilova (1991) Steffi Graf (1992) Steffi Graf (1993) Steffi Graf (1994) Conchita Martínez (1995) Steffi Graf (1996) Steffi Graf (1997) Martina Hingis (1998) Jana Novotná (1999) Lindsay Davenport (2000) Venus Williams (2001) Venus Williams (2002) Serena Williams (2003) Serena Williams (2004) Maria Sharapova (2005) Venus Williams (2006) Amélie Mauresmo (2007) Venus Williams (2008) Venus Williams (2009) Serena Williams (2010) Serena Williams (2011) Petra Kvitová (2012) Serena Williams (2013) Marion Bartoli (2014) Petra Kvitová (2015) Serena Williams (2016) Serena Williams (2017) Garbiñe Muguruza

v t e

US Open women's singles champions

(1968) Virginia Wade (1969) Margaret Court (1970) Margaret Court (1971) Billie Jean King (1972) Billie Jean King (1973) Margaret Court (1974) Billie Jean King (1975) Chris Evert (1976) Chris Evert (1977) Chris Evert (1978) Chris Evert (1979) Tracy Austin (1980) Chris Evert (1981) Tracy Austin (1982) Chris Evert (1983) Martina Navratilova (1984) Martina Navratilova (1985) Hana Mandlíková (1986) Martina Navratilova (1987) Martina Navratilova (1988) Steffi Graf (1989) Steffi Graf (1990) Gabriela Sabatini (1991) Monica Seles (1992) Monica Seles (1993) Steffi Graf (1994) Arantxa Sánchez Vicario (1995) Steffi Graf (1996) Steffi Graf (1997) Martina Hingis (1998) Lindsay Davenport (1999) Serena Williams (2000) Venus Williams (2001) Venus Williams (2002) Serena Williams (2003) Justine Henin (2004) Svetlana Kuznetsova (2005) Kim Clijsters (2006) Maria Sharapova (2007) Justine Henin (2008) Serena Williams (2009) Kim Clijsters (2010) Kim Clijsters (2011) Samantha Stosur (2012) Serena Williams (2013) Serena Williams (2014) Serena Williams (2015) Flavia Pennetta (2016) Angelique Kerber (2017) Sloane Stephens

v t e

French Open
French Open
women's doubles champions

(1968) Françoise Dürr
Françoise Dürr
/ Ann Haydon-Jones (1969) Françoise Dürr
Françoise Dürr
/ Ann Haydon-Jones (1970) Gail Chanfreau / Françoise Dürr (1971) Gail Chanfreau / Françoise Dürr (1972) Billie Jean King
Billie Jean King
/ Betty Stöve (1973) Margaret Court
Margaret Court
/ Virginia Wade (1974) Chris Evert
Chris Evert
/ Olga Morozova (1975) Chris Evert
Chris Evert
/ Martina Navratilova (1976) Fiorella Bonicelli / Gail Chanfreau (1977) Regina Maršíková / Pam Teeguarden (1978) Mima Jaušovec / Virginia Ruzici (1979) Betty Stöve
Betty Stöve
/ Wendy Turnbull (1980) Kathy Jordan / Anne Smith (1981) Rosalyn Fairbank Nideffer / Tanya Harford (1982) Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
/ Anne Smith (1983) Rosalyn Fairbank Nideffer / Candy Reynolds (1984) Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
/ Pam Shriver (1985) Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
/ Pam Shriver (1986) Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
/ Andrea Temesvári (1987) Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
/ Pam Shriver (1988) Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
/ Pam Shriver (1989) Larisa Savchenko Neiland / Natalia Zvereva (1990) Jana Novotná
Jana Novotná
/ Helena Suková (1991) Gigi Fernández
Gigi Fernández
/ Jana Novotná (1992) Gigi Fernández
Gigi Fernández
/ Natalia Zvereva (1993) Gigi Fernández
Gigi Fernández
/ Natalia Zvereva (1994) Gigi Fernández
Gigi Fernández
/ Natalia Zvereva (1995) Gigi Fernández
Gigi Fernández
/ Natalia Zvereva (1996) Lindsay Davenport
Lindsay Davenport
/ Mary Joe Fernández (1997) Gigi Fernández
Gigi Fernández
/ Natalia Zvereva (1998) Martina Hingis
Martina Hingis
/ Jana Novotná (1999) Serena Williams
Serena Williams
/ Venus Williams (2000) Martina Hingis
Martina Hingis
/ Mary Pierce (2001) Virginia Ruano Pascual
Virginia Ruano Pascual
/ Paola Suárez (2002) Virginia Ruano Pascual
Virginia Ruano Pascual
/ Paola Suárez (2003) Kim Clijsters
Kim Clijsters
/ Ai Sugiyama (2004) Virginia Ruano Pascual
Virginia Ruano Pascual
/ Paola Suárez (2005) Virginia Ruano Pascual
Virginia Ruano Pascual
/ Paola Suárez (2006) Lisa Raymond
Lisa Raymond
/ Samantha Stosur (2007) Alicia Molik
Alicia Molik
/ Mara Santangelo (2008) Anabel Medina Garrigues
Anabel Medina Garrigues
/ Virginia Ruano Pascual (2009) Anabel Medina Garrigues
Anabel Medina Garrigues
/ Virginia Ruano Pascual (2010) Serena Williams
Serena Williams
/ Venus Williams (2011) Andrea Hlaváčková
Andrea Hlaváčková
/ Lucie Hradecká (2012) Sara Errani
Sara Errani
/ Roberta Vinci (2013) Ekaterina Makarova
Ekaterina Makarova
/ Elena Vesnina (2014) Hsieh Su-wei
Hsieh Su-wei
/ Peng Shuai (2015) Bethanie Mattek-Sands
Bethanie Mattek-Sands
/ Lucie Šafářová (2016) Caroline Garcia
Caroline Garcia
/ Kristina Mladenovic (2017) Bethanie Mattek-Sands
Bethanie Mattek-Sands
/ Lucie Šafářová

v t e

Wimbledon (Open Era) ladies' doubles champions

(1968) Rosemary Casals / Billie Jean King (1969) Margaret Court
Margaret Court
/ Judy Tegart Dalton (1970) Rosemary Casals / Billie Jean King (1971) Rosemary Casals / Billie Jean King (1972) Billie Jean King
Billie Jean King
/ Betty Stöve (1973) Rosemary Casals / Billie Jean King (1974) Evonne Goolagong Cawley
Evonne Goolagong Cawley
/ Peggy Michel (1975) Ann Kiyomura / Kazuko Sawamatsu (1976) Chris Evert
Chris Evert
/ Martina Navratilova (1977) Helen Gourlay Cawley / JoAnne Russell (1978) Kerry Melville Reid
Kerry Melville Reid
/ Wendy Turnbull (1979) Billie Jean King
Billie Jean King
/ Martina Navratilova (1980) Kathy Jordan / Anne Smith (1981) Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
/ Pam Shriver (1982) Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
/ Pam Shriver (1983) Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
/ Pam Shriver (1984) Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
/ Pam Shriver (1985) Kathy Jordan / Elizabeth Sayers Smylie (1986) Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
/ Pam Shriver (1987) Claudia Kohde-Kilsch
Claudia Kohde-Kilsch
/ Helena Suková (1988) Steffi Graf
Steffi Graf
/ Gabriela Sabatini (1989) Jana Novotná
Jana Novotná
/ Helena Suková (1990) Jana Novotná
Jana Novotná
/ Helena Suková (1991) Larisa Savchenko Neiland / Natalia Zvereva (1992) Gigi Fernández
Gigi Fernández
/ Natalia Zvereva (1993) Gigi Fernández
Gigi Fernández
/ Natalia Zvereva (1994) Gigi Fernández
Gigi Fernández
/ Natalia Zvereva (1995) Jana Novotná
Jana Novotná
/ Arantxa Sánchez Vicario (1996) Martina Hingis
Martina Hingis
/ Helena Suková (1997) Gigi Fernández
Gigi Fernández
/ Natasha Zvereva (1998) Martina Hingis
Martina Hingis
/ Jana Novotná (1999) Lindsay Davenport
Lindsay Davenport
/ Corina Morariu (2000) Serena Williams
Serena Williams
/ Venus Williams (2001) Lisa Raymond
Lisa Raymond
/ Rennae Stubbs (2002) Serena Williams
Serena Williams
/ Venus Williams (2003) Kim Clijsters
Kim Clijsters
/ Ai Sugiyama (2004) Cara Black
Cara Black
/ Rennae Stubbs (2005) Cara Black
Cara Black
/ Liezel Huber (2006) Yan Zi / Zheng Jie (2007) Cara Black
Cara Black
/ Liezel Huber (2008) Serena Williams
Serena Williams
/ Venus Williams (2009) Serena Williams
Serena Williams
/ Venus Williams (2010) Vania King
Vania King
/ Yaroslava Shvedova (2011) Květa Peschke
Květa Peschke
/ Katarina Srebotnik (2012) Serena Williams
Serena Williams
/ Venus Williams (2013) Hsieh Su-wei
Hsieh Su-wei
/ Peng Shuai (2014) Sara Errani
Sara Errani
/ Roberta Vinci (2015) Martina Hingis
Martina Hingis
/ Sania Mirza (2016) Serena Williams
Serena Williams
/ Venus Williams (2017) Ekaterina Makarova
Ekaterina Makarova
/ Elena Vesnina

v t e

Grand Slam / non-calendar year / career Grand Slam-winning singles/doubles tennis players

Grand Slam

Men's singles

1938: Don Budge 1962: Rod Laver 1969: Rod Laver

Women's singles

1953: Maureen Connolly 1970: Margaret Court 1988: Steffi Graf

Men's doubles

1951: Ken McGregor/ Frank Sedgman

Women's doubles

1960: Maria Bueno 1984: Martina Navratilova/ Pam Shriver 1998: Martina Hingis

Mixed doubles

1963: Margaret Court/ Ken Fletcher 1965: Margaret Court 1967: Owen Davidson

Non-calendar year Grand Slam

Men's singles

2015–16: Novak Djokovic

Women's singles

1983–84: Martina Navratilova 1993–94: Steffi Graf 2002–03: Serena Williams 2014–15: Serena Williams

Men's doubles

2012–13: Bob Bryan/ Mike Bryan

Women's doubles

1949–50: Louise Brough 1986–87: Martina Navratilova/ Pam Shriver 1992–93: Gigi Fernández/ Natasha Zvereva 1996–97: Natasha Zvereva 2009–10: Serena Williams/ Venus Williams

Mixed doubles

1967–68 Billie Jean King

Career Grand Slam

Men's singles

1933-34-35: Fred Perry 1937-38: Don Budge 1960-61-62: Rod Laver 1961-63-64: Roy Emerson 1992-94-95-99: Andre Agassi 2003-04-09: Roger Federer 2005-08-09-10: Rafael Nadal 2008-11-16: Novak Djokovic

Women's singles

1951-52-53: Maureen Connolly 1949-50-51-54: Doris Hart 1951-56-57: Shirley Fry Irvin 1960-62-63: Margaret Court 1966-67-68-72: Billie Jean King 1974-75-82: Chris Evert 1978-81-82-83: Martina Navratilova 1987-88: Steffi Graf 1999-2002-03: Serena Williams 2004-06-08-12: Maria Sharapova

Men's doubles

1935-36-39: Adrian Quist 1948-50-51 Frank Sedgman 1951: Ken McGregor 1953–56: Lew Hoad/ Ken Rosewall 1957-58-59: Neale Fraser 1959-60-62: Roy Emerson 1965–67: John Newcombe/ Tony Roche 1962-64-67-77: Bob Hewitt 1982-84-86-89: John Fitzgerald 1983-87-89: Anders Järryd 1994-95-98: Jacco Eltingh/ Paul Haarhuis 1989-92–93-2000: Mark Woodforde 1992–93-95-2000: Todd Woodbridge 1998-2002-03-05: Jonas Björkman 2003-05-06: Bob Bryan/ Mike Bryan 2002-04-07-08: Daniel Nestor 1999-2006-12: Leander Paes

Women's doubles

1942-46-50: Louise Brough
Louise Brough
Clapp 1947-48-50-51: Doris Hart 1950-51-57: Shirley Fry Irvin 1956–1957: Althea Gibson 1958–60: Maria Bueno 1961–64: Lesley Turner Bowrey 1961-63-64: Margaret Court 1964-66-69-70: Judy Tegart Dalton 1980–81: Kathy Jordan/ Anne Smith 1975-76-77-80: / Martina Navratilova 1981-82-83-84: Pam Shriver 1989-90-93: Helena Suková 1988–90-91-92: Gigi Fernández 1989-90-91-93: / Natasha Zvereva 1989-90-94: Jana Novotná 1996-97-98: Martina Hingis 1999-2000-01: Serena Williams/ Venus Williams 2000-01-06: Lisa Raymond 2012-13-14: Sara Errani/ Roberta Vinci

Mixed doubles

1925-26-27-28 Jean Borotra 1949–51: Doris Hart/ Frank Sedgman 1961-1963: Margaret Court 1962-1963: Ken Fletcher 1965-66-67: Owen Davidson 1967–68: Billie Jean King 1969–75: Marty Riessen 1961-70-77-79: Bob Hewitt 1992–93-95: Mark Woodforde 1990-93-94-95: Todd Woodbridge 1974-85-2003: Martina Navratilova 2001-02-05: Daniela Hantuchová 1997-99-2005-06: Mahesh Bhupathi 2002-04-08-10: Cara Black 1999-2003-08-16: Leander Paes 2006-15-16: Martina Hingis

Chris Evert
Chris Evert
Achievements

v t e

Women's Tennis
Tennis
Association (WTA) world No. 1 singles players

Chris Evert
Chris Evert
(1975/1985 – 260 w) Evonne Goolagong
Evonne Goolagong
(1976 – 2 w) Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
(1978/1987 – 331 w) Tracy Austin
Tracy Austin
(1980 – 22 w) Steffi Graf
Steffi Graf
(1987/1997 – 377 w) // Monica Seles
Monica Seles
(1991/1996 – 178 w) Arantxa Sánchez Vicario
Arantxa Sánchez Vicario
(1995 – 12 w) Martina Hingis
Martina Hingis
(1997/2001 – 209 w) Lindsay Davenport
Lindsay Davenport
(1998/2006 – 98 w) Jennifer Capriati
Jennifer Capriati
(2001/2002 – 17 w) Venus Williams
Venus Williams
(2002 – 11 w) Serena Williams
Serena Williams
(2002/2017 – 319 w) Kim Clijsters
Kim Clijsters
(2003/2011 – 20 w) Justine Henin
Justine Henin
(2003/2008 – 117 w) Amélie Mauresmo
Amélie Mauresmo
(2004/2006 – 39 w) Maria Sharapova
Maria Sharapova
(2005/2012 – 21 w) Ana Ivanovic
Ana Ivanovic
(2008 – 12 w) Jelena Janković
Jelena Janković
(2008/2009 – 18 w) Dinara Safina
Dinara Safina
(2009 – 26 w) Caroline Wozniacki
Caroline Wozniacki
(2010/2018 – 71 w) Victoria Azarenka
Victoria Azarenka
(2012/2013 – 51 w) Angelique Kerber
Angelique Kerber
(2016/2017 – 34 w) Karolína Plíšková
Karolína Plíšková
(2017 – 8 w) Garbiñe Muguruza
Garbiñe Muguruza
(2017 – 4 w) Simona Halep
Simona Halep
(2017/2018 – 22 w)

WTA rankings incepted on November 3, 1975 (year first held/year last held – number of weeks (w)) current No. 1 in bold, as of week of April 2, 2018[update]

v t e

WTA Year-end championships winners singles

(1972) Chris Evert (1973) Chris Evert (1974) Evonne Goolagong (1975) Chris Evert (1976) Evonne Goolagong (1977) Chris Evert (1978) Martina Navratilova (1979) Martina Navratilova (1980) Tracy Austin (1981) Martina Navratilova (1982) Sylvia Hanika (1983) Martina Navratilova (1984) Martina Navratilova (1985) Martina Navratilova (1986-1) Martina Navratilova (1986-2) Martina Navratilova (1987) Steffi Graf (1988) Gabriela Sabatini (1989) Steffi Graf (1990) Monica Seles (1991) Monica Seles (1992) Monica Seles (1993) Steffi Graf (1994) Gabriela Sabatini (1995) Steffi Graf (1996) Steffi Graf (1997) Jana Novotná (1998) Martina Hingis (1999) Lindsay Davenport (2000) Martina Hingis (2001) Serena Williams (2002) Kim Clijsters (2003) Kim Clijsters (2004) Maria Sharapova (2005) Amélie Mauresmo (2006) Justine Henin (2007) Justine Henin (2008) Venus Williams (2009) Serena Williams (2010) Kim Clijsters (2011) Petra Kvitová (2012) Serena Williams (2013) Serena Williams (2014) Serena Williams (2015) Agnieszka Radwańska (2016) Dominika Cibulková (2017) Caroline Wozniacki

v t e

Sports Illustrated
Sports Illustrated
Sportsperson of the Year

1954: Roger Bannister 1955: Johnny Podres 1956: Bobby Morrow 1957: Stan Musial 1958: Rafer Johnson 1959: Ingemar Johansson 1960: Arnold Palmer 1961: Jerry Lucas 1962: Terry Baker 1963: Pete Rozelle 1964: Ken Venturi 1965: Sandy Koufax 1966: Jim Ryun 1967: Carl Yastrzemski 1968: Bill Russell 1969: Tom Seaver 1970: Bobby Orr 1971: Lee Trevino 1972: Billie Jean King
Billie Jean King
& John Wooden 1973: Jackie Stewart 1974: Muhammad Ali 1975: Pete Rose 1976: Chris Evert 1977: Steve Cauthen 1978: Jack Nicklaus 1979: Terry Bradshaw
Terry Bradshaw
& Willie Stargell 1980: U.S. Olympic Hockey Team 1981: Sugar Ray Leonard 1982: Wayne Gretzky 1983: Mary Decker 1984: Edwin Moses
Edwin Moses
& Mary Lou Retton 1985: Kareem Abdul-Jabbar 1986: Joe Paterno 1987: Bob Bourne, Judi Brown King, Kipchoge Keino, Dale Murphy, Chip Rives, Patty Sheehan, Rory Sparrow, & Reggie Williams 1988: Orel Hershiser 1989: Greg LeMond 1990: Joe Montana 1991: Michael Jordan 1992: Arthur Ashe 1993: Don Shula 1994: Bonnie Blair
Bonnie Blair
& Johann Olav Koss 1995: Cal Ripken Jr. 1996: Tiger Woods 1997: Dean Smith 1998: Mark McGwire
Mark McGwire
& Sammy Sosa 1999: U.S. Women's Soccer Team 2000: Tiger Woods 2001: Curt Schilling
Curt Schilling
& Randy Johnson 2002: Lance Armstrong 2003: David Robinson & Tim Duncan 2004: Boston Red Sox 2005: Tom Brady 2006: Dwyane Wade 2007: Brett Favre 2008: Michael Phelps 2009: Derek Jeter 2010: Drew Brees 2011: Mike Krzyzewski
Mike Krzyzewski
& Pat Summitt 2012: LeBron James 2013: Peyton Manning 2014: Madison Bumgarner 2015: Serena Williams 2016: LeBron James 2017: José Altuve
José Altuve
& J. J. Watt

v t e

Florida Women's Hall of Fame administered by the Florida Commission on the Status of Women

1980–1989

1982

Mary McLeod Bethune Helene S. Coleman Elaine Gordon Wilhelmina Celeste Goehring Harvey Paula Mae Milton Barbara Jo Palmer

1984

Roxcy O’Neal Bolton Barbara Landstreet Frye Lena B. Smithers Hughes Zora Neale Hurston Sybil Collins Mobley Helen Muir Gladys Pumariega Soler Julia DeForest Sturtevant Tuttle

1986

Annie Ackerman Rosemary Barkett Gwendolyn Sawyer Cherry Dorothy Dodd Marjory Stoneman Douglas Elsie Jones Hare Elizabeth McCullough Johnson Frances Bartlett Kinne Arva Moore Parks McCabe Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings Florence Barbara Seibert Marilyn K. Smith Eartha M. M. White

1990–1999

1992

Jacqueline Cochran Carrie P. Meek Ruth Bryan Owen

1993

Betty Skelton Frankman Erde Paulina Pedroso Janet Reno

1994

Nikki Beare Betty Mae Jumper Gladys Nichols Milton

1995

Evelyn Stocking Crosslin JoAnn Hardin Morgan Sarah Brooks Pryor

1996

Marjorie Harris Carr Betty Castor Ivy Julia Cromartie Stranahan

1997

Alicia Baro Carita Doggett Corse M. Athalie Range

1998

Helen Gordon Davis Mattie Belle Davis Christine Fulwylie-Bankston

1999

Althea Gibson Sister Jeanne O’Laughlin Dessie Smith Prescott

2000–2009

2000

Chris Evert Paula Fickes Hawkins Marianne Mathewson-Chapman

2001

Jessie Ball duPont Lenore Carrero Nesbitt Lynda Keever

2002

Victoria Joyce Ely Toni Jennings Frances Langford
Frances Langford
Stuart

2003

Sarah Ann Blocker Gloria Estefan Mary R. Grizzle

2004/2005

Shirley D. Coletti Judith Kersey Marion Hammer

2005/2006

Caridad Asensio Tillie Fowler Lucy W. Morgan

2006/2007

Maryly VanLeer Peck Peggy A. Quince

2007/2008

Barbara J. Pariente Pallavi Patel Ileana Ros-Lehtinen

2008/2009

Louise H. Cortelis Gwen Margolis Betty Schlesinger Sembler

2009/2010

Eugenie Clark Claudine Dianne Ryce Dara Grace Torres

2010–2019

2010/2011

Mary Brennan Karl Anna I. Rodriguez

2011/2012

Ruth H. Alexander Elizabeth "Budd" Bell Vicki Bryant Burke

2012/2013

Clara C. Frye Aleene Pridgen Kidd MacKenzie Lillie Pierce Voss

2013/2014

Susan Benton Louise Jones Gopher Dottie Berger MacKinnon

2014/2015

Mary Lee Farrior Evelyn Cahn Keiser Charlotte Edwards Maguire

2016

Carol Jenkins Barnett Helen Aguirre Ferré Elmira Louise Leto

2017

Mary Lou Baker Kathleen Scott Robertson Katherine Fernandez Rundle

v t e

Associated Press Female Athlete of the Year

1931: Helene Madison 1932: Babe Didrikson Zaharias 1933: Helen Jacobs 1934: Virginia Van Wie 1935: Helen Wills 1936: Helen Stephens 1937: Katherine Rawls 1938: Patty Berg 1939: Alice Marble 1940: Alice Marble 1941: Betty Hicks 1942: Gloria Callen 1943: Patty Berg 1944: Ann Curtis 1945: Babe Didrikson Zaharias 1946: Babe Didrikson Zaharias 1947: Babe Didrikson Zaharias 1948: Fanny Blankers-Koen 1949: Marlene Hagge 1950: Babe Didrikson Zaharias 1951: Maureen Connolly 1952: Maureen Connolly 1953: Maureen Connolly 1954: Babe Didrikson Zaharias 1955: Patty Berg 1956: Pat McCormick 1957: Althea Gibson 1958: Althea Gibson 1959: Maria Bueno 1960: Wilma Rudolph 1961: Wilma Rudolph 1962: Dawn Fraser 1963: Mickey Wright 1964: Mickey Wright 1965: Kathy Whitworth 1966: Kathy Whitworth 1967: Billie Jean King 1968: Peggy Fleming 1969: Debbie Meyer 1970: Chi Cheng 1971: Evonne Goolagong 1972: Olga Korbut 1973: Billie Jean King 1974: Chris Evert 1975: Chris Evert 1976: Nadia Comăneci 1977: Chris Evert 1978: Nancy Lopez 1979: Tracy Austin 1980: Chris Evert 1981: Tracy Austin 1982: Mary Decker 1983: Martina Navratilova 1984: Mary Lou Retton 1985: Nancy Lopez 1986: Martina Navratilova 1987: Jackie Joyner-Kersee 1988: Florence Griffith Joyner 1989: Steffi Graf 1990: Beth Daniel 1991: Monica Seles 1992: Monica Seles 1993: Sheryl Swoopes 1994: Bonnie Blair 1995: Rebecca Lobo 1996: Amy Van Dyken 1997: Martina Hingis 1998: Pak Se-ri 1999: United States
United States
women's national soccer team 2000: Marion Jones 2001: Jennifer Capriati 2002: Serena Williams 2003: Annika Sörenstam 2004: Annika Sörenstam 2005: Annika Sörenstam 2006: Lorena Ochoa 2007: Lorena Ochoa 2008: Candace Parker 2009: Serena Williams 2010: Lindsey Vonn 2011: Abby Wambach 2012: Gabby Douglas 2013: Serena Williams 2014: Mo'ne Davis 2015: Serena Williams 2016: Simone Biles 2017: Katie Ledecky

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 1158143 LCCN: n79082283 ISNI: 0000 0001 0796 4169 GND: 131902962 SUDOC: 115163581 BNF: cb13930135p (data) NDL: 00447879 SN

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